Burke Bar

  1. selectedgrub

    selectedgrub Member

    Messages:
    1,067
    Location:
    New Zealand
    What is a burke bar? They look to be over engineered
     
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  2. Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    973
    Location:
    Earth


     
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  3. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    Well, right now it's for pulling trees out, especially if they're among the brambles.

    [​IMG]

    Burke Bar 1. Tree 0.

    [​IMG]

    it is "over engineered" yes. That's the point, after all, nothing too strong ever broke.

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    20mm! Eek. Good luck with that! Half inch was bad enough, it takes a TON of energy to get it up to temperature. A small section of that would make a decent axe or hatchet. You may find it has a taper to it but I am struggling to think what you'd make out of such a massive lump pf spring steel.

    I had to update my forge just for the half inch stuff (will update the relevant post).
     
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  5. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    10,243
    Location:
    Towcester
    It took long enough to cut a bit with the big grinder
     
  6. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    I'd happily swap you a chunk of 10mm leaf spring (see above) or some car coil spring for some of that unfeasibly thick leaf spring.

    Incidentally, I thought I'd break out the 9 inch grinder to make the cut but tbh, the 4.5 inch with a thin cutting disk did a great job. never mind the broken one, that was my stupid fault.
     
  7. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    You should definitely be making yourself a Burke Bar... Trust me, you'd love it.
     
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  8. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    10,243
    Location:
    Towcester
    You can have some, I’ve got way more than I’ll ever need

    I’ll check sizes properly in the morning
     
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  9. Memmeddu

    Memmeddu Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Location:
    Italia Sardegna
    Tell me what you did to break out the grinder maybe is easy to repair
     
  10. Memmeddu

    Memmeddu Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Location:
    Italia Sardegna
    I think that is possible reduce the volume of dead space into the forge using formiculite (I don't know if is the right term ,here in Italy call it this way) that is a good insulation material .
    Wrapping the piece with this material and leaving the part which will be bent exposed to the forge burner
    Before to take out to bend it under the press,if you have a OA rig you put an heating nozzle ,ignite the torch and point onto the piece
    Take It out and bend it , after that it needs to be tempered
     
  11. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    To "break out" in this case means to retrieve it from storage. It is a perfectly good example of a 9 inch grinder though given the choice, I would always prefer to use something else (anything else!). Those big grinders are an accident looking for somewhere to happen.
     
  12. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    Hmm. I doubt if vermiculite would be a particularly good idea. It is very light and the particle size is so small, they'd probably blow out of the forge before they did anything useful. A few big bricks in there does the job nicely thanks. If I do anything else, I might put an extra couple of inches of kaowool in the roof section. It really doesn't need to be as high as it is. Need to make up some more refractory "glue" first and "break out" the NBC suit.
     
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  13. Memmeddu

    Memmeddu Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Location:
    Italia Sardegna
    I know what you mean ,I have a Bosch GWS 18-230 if I can use something different ... I use something different.
    It's heavy and dangerous , but I found a compromise that is called Metabo WE19-180 Quick RT
    Safer than a 9" grinder
    Lighter than a 9" grinder
    Quicker than a 9" grinder

    I bought this grinder after got kickback with the Bosch (that now is taking dust on the shelf) , and I found it very comfortable to operate because the size and the weight (less than 3 kg , exactly 2,7kg)
    Otherwise I would like to have a plasma cutter or an Harris combination torch set to oxy-propane
    I also always always use the guard positioned this way to help the clutch to desingage if the disc jams
    But is easy and quick adjust guard so if I need it took few seconds to change position
    I love this grinder
     
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  14. Hood

    Hood Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,023
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    I use 9" grinders every day of my life as well as 4.5" ones and I would say the 4.5" ones are more likely to cause injuries than the 9" ones. Yes the bigger ones have more potential to do greater damage to the body but due to their size they require two handed operation and personally I think they are safer.
     
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  15. Memmeddu

    Memmeddu Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Location:
    Italia Sardegna
    I always use any kind of grinder with both hands and safety guard installed
    9" are simply heavy and personally after a while I go to be tired so the confidence to the tool becomes less .
    With this I'm not saying that I fell confident with any tool that can cause serious injury but essentially if I'm not tired I think that I'm in better condition to control a tool
    Also hand held drills are dangerous if you have not clue of what can happen if the bit jams
     
  16. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
  17. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    Another very similar problem "popped up" in an awkward space between my boundary "fence" and the neighbours.

    [​IMG]

    Sycamores don't hang about and in no time at all can become a serious issue.

    [​IMG]

    There was another one taking off right next to a concrete boundary post. Access was limited!

    [​IMG]

    Sycamore Forest 0: Burk Bar United 3.

    [​IMG]

    I cut this down to 56 inches but am beginning to wish I hadn't. I don't have enough weight to trouble either end of this device. It could easily accept a few more feet of leverage. Those Sycamore roots are as tough as old boots and they demand a huge amount of effort if you need to literally rip them out without digging or wiggling. It's great for stabbing into the ground and letting the angled end burrow its way under the target. I'm still thinking about making another dead straight version, next time even sharper!
     
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  18. Chillitt Member

    Messages:
    859
    Location:
    Cirencester
    Is that you putting your feet up for a few days? :D
     
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  19. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    Yes. Bit of pottering about in the garden....

    Oh and a bit of skip dipping in someone elses. I might start a thread on that, some rich pickings from a rich neighbour.
     
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  20. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,418
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    Like the bar, very handy.

    How about making a extension that fits in the end of the box like a two part trolley jack handle.
     
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