The second most dangerous tool in the shop

  1. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,422
    UK London
    Everything is perfectly safe in my workshop, until I go in there of course. What is the most dangerous tool in your home workshop (present company excepted)?

    There should be an element of risk compensation or risk aversion in your considered reply. So anything that shoots flame is so obviously dangerous, it is usually treated with respect. I may need to reconsider my options here and I'll have another think next time I am out there.

    Current contender has to be the 9 inch angle grinder. I know it's a beast and it has a reluctant switch which doesn't help but even so, it always catches me by surprise at just how damned dangerous that thing is.

    The lathe needs to be considered as a candidate because it's so easy to become blasé. I caught myself (not literally!) wearing a long sleeve fleece while quickly turning some widget or other.

    I dropped my large garden croppers the other day. Landed handle down on the floor just as the bladed end came to rest in the upper trouser area, just before the second handle gave way to gravity. :o

    Like maintaining your security passwords, having copies of your keys and backing up your computer, it is worth considering workshop safety every once in a while. Because like those other everyday things, it's only when something goes wrong we really step back and think how easy it would have been to avoid disaster.
     
    Mattuk, Memmeddu, fizzy and 1 other person like this.
  2. Richard.

    Richard. Member

    Messages:
    18,275
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    The danger associated with a tool is solely down to the situation in which it’s been used. I could pick any piece of equipment I own and say it’s more dangerous than another but in theory it should all be perfectly safe to use if used properly. A flat bladed screwdriver can kill you easily if your using it to pry something and slip, running it through a vital organ or a main line.
    There is only one danger in a workshop because the tools don’t use themselves.
     
    mtt.tr, Bsmith, Barlidge and 5 others like this.
  3. ronan

    ronan Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    9,371
    dublin
    I am always wary of 9" grinders, hate them even though i have being using them for donkeys years.
     
    fizzy and eil like this.
  4. spencer 427

    spencer 427 Member

    Messages:
    6,462
    uk colchester
    Location:
    uk colchester
    The most dangerous tool in the workshop is the mrs when she ventures in there. The hawk eye don't miss nothing.....
     
    Memmeddu, Turbo, fizzy and 12 others like this.
  5. spencer 427

    spencer 427 Member

    Messages:
    6,462
    uk colchester
    Location:
    uk colchester
    I hate them 9 inch grinders. Will not use one
     
    arther dailey, owas and ronan like this.
  6. fixerupper

    fixerupper Member

    Messages:
    1,525
    Location:
    Crete Greece
    ...I don't hate them , I respect 'em they are very useful and very hard to kill ( the one I have I bought when I was 28 now I'm 65 ) unlike 4inch or five inch grinderettes..... they are disposable items....
     
    pressbrake1 and stuvy like this.
  7. Lazurus

    Lazurus Member

    Messages:
    639
    Location:
    Norfolk uk
    The cat! He has recently decided this is the best place in the world even when the machines are running, bless him as he has Feline dementia but he loves to sit behind you, so turn round and over you go...... I have found a quick quirt with the airline deters him, but he always silently returns and takes his position again, and over you go.......
     
    Turbo, stuvy and dobbslc like this.
  8. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,678
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    9" grinders have never bothered me. Mind you the biggest blade I'd use at work is 2.2metres diameter so it's hardly surprising.
     
    jenki, stuvy, Seadog and 3 others like this.
  9. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    10,243
    Location:
    Towcester
    Are you a villan from the Bond Movie where Bond is tied to a table with a big saw blade moving towards him ?
     
  10. Richard.

    Richard. Member

    Messages:
    18,275
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    When I went round to pick up the surface plate we carried it over the pond of mutated piranhas :laughing:
    Needless to say there was no price haggling
     
    Turbo, Hopefuldave, stuvy and 4 others like this.
  11. AndersK Member

    Messages:
    711
    Location:
    Sweden
    The most dangerous tool is the hands using other tools.

    Part from that my vote goes to the table saw.
    200 teeth will go thru your flesh before you even know it gone bad...
     
    hunter27, Memmeddu, Cyberprog and 2 others like this.
  12. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    10,243
    Location:
    Towcester
    This leads nicely into the consideration of Hazard and Risk.

    Most things have some sort of hazard associated with them, when that hazard is realized it may create harm

    Dealing with risk is how we prevent any hazard from being realized.

    Danger is our perception of both Hazard and Risk

    I perceive bungee jumping to be quite "dangerous" as I don't have the confidence to do it, but others take part, often without incident.

    One of the most simple tools that's causes the most injuries is the humble Stanley Knife
     
  13. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,678
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    An EDF guy told me it's a sackable offence to be found with a stanley knife in their tool kit. Most sites I go on insist that they must be the self-retracting type.
     
    julianthegypsy and Parm like this.
  14. awemawson Forum Supporter

    The most dangerous thing's in my workshop are visitors who can't stop fiddling with things. Not only are they a danger to themselves, but might be to me when I start using something that they have inadvertently left loose / unset etc etc :doh:

    :sheep::sheep::sheep:
     
    Memmeddu, Hopefuldave, stuvy and 5 others like this.
  15. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    10,243
    Location:
    Towcester
    It is an essential tool, widely used in food and drink industries where sacks are required to be cut open when adding to processes etc. Usually very strict controls, sign in and out etc as well as training and use of cut proof gloves
     
    stuvy likes this.
  16. Tangledfeet

    Tangledfeet Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,145
    Location:
    St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
    My bandsaw. (Wood, not metal)

    Tends to get used largely for cutting up logs and chunks from larger trees into spindle and bowl blanks; can't use push sticks for the latter. Nipped the end of a finger a few weeks ago and I came away thinking just how lucky I was...
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  17. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,083
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Table saw. Not my fingers in the blade that worries me its kickback.
    Had a big chunk of iroko launched a good hundred feet a few years ago
     
  18. Wightsparks

    Wightsparks Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,258
    Location:
    Wight
    Wire brush - the hand version. Most people wouldn't use a drill/grinder wire brush without glasses, but pick up a hand wire brush and the potential for high velocity flick of debris into the eye is often underrated.
     
    Gwil, Mattuk, Memmeddu and 3 others like this.
  19. Anguz

    Anguz Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    478
    bedfordshire
    Till I gave it away, my old wolf gutbuster drill... now it's the knotted wire cup brush I have for my 9" grinder
     
    Gwil, monky harris and pressbrake1 like this.
  20. Dcal Member

    Messages:
    1,468
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    Did you really expect her not to notice your latest lathe!
     
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