Bedford TK

  1. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    Trial fitting the front panel was quite tricky because it has returns on both sides where it wraps into the door shuts. You have to sort of spring it into place.

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    After a few goes and adjusting the flanges to get a nice close fit I removed the panel, cleaned up all the joining faces with a flap wheel and painted with this stuff:

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    t's a weld-through primer. I haven't used this before and I can't comment about its corrosion resistance but it seems to do exactly what it claims: it is very easy to weld through.

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    I clamped it all up with a number of mole-grips and started on the windscreen pillar corners because I reckon that these would be the most obvious if they don't align. The first thing I discovered was...

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    ...lead! - where the original panel joint had been filled. It really doesn't weld very well but after a bit of heating and wiping and welding...

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    Then just a matter of plug-welding and grinding the 200 odd holes. It took me quite a while to get the technique and it still isn't that pretty but it all gets hidden by the grinder.
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    And finally it looks like this
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    andy_v likes this.
  2. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

    Messages:
    17,819
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Then sit down with a brew and admire your work :cool:
     
  3. Angusdog

    Angusdog Well-meaning amateur

    Messages:
    724
    Location:
    Wellington, NZ
    I've been following this thread and it's great. Didn't realise you're a kiwi until I saw the old door with 'Kaiapoi' on it ;)

    Where did you get the copper weld-through spray? Looks handy.
     
  4. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    Not a 'real' Kiwi but I've been here over ten years. My mum was born in the Waikato.

    The weld-through primer came from these folks - www.rjp.co.nz (I think!).
     
    Gan gan 123 likes this.
  5. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    The next job I will tackle is to try and remove the distortion that I introduced in the front panel when I welded a patch in the middle. It was almost impossible to photograph so I have drawn in the patch, the high spots and the low spots.

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    I was all set to get stuck in and shrink that big low spot on the right but luckily the tool I ordered had not turned up which left me more time to think it through...

    The big low spot is metal I haven't touched; it is caused by distortion from welding so I'm guessing that if I work on the high spots at the corners of my patch the whole thing will improve. That's my theory anyway!

    Here is the tool I have bought, a shrinking disc for a 9: grinder

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    andy_v likes this.
  6. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    As I mentioned before, the replacement front panel has a multitude of faults. Under a thick layer of filler was old accident repair work and I have introduced warping when I welded a patch panel in. To try and improve this I bought one of these:


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    It is a shrinking disc, a flat piece of stainless that goes on a 9" grinder. I discovered it on YouTube and bought it here. The owner, Ray Schelin makes and markets these discs. I bought the disc and a backing plate that makes it more rigid. I did not bother with the DVD that goes with it. Ray was very quick and helpful answering my queries.


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    I hired a 9" grinder locally. I did try using my 5" grinder but it did not work at all well: the gyroscopic forces generated by the disc spinning at 10,000 rpm attached to a small grinder made it almost unmanageable. The bigger heavier 9" grinder spinning at 6,000 rpm was much easier to use.


    Its purpose is to remove high spots by shrinking metal and I can say that is works very well. Using the disc as flat as possible you apply the disc until the high spot gets hot, then quench it with a wet rag. It is much easier to do this job with two people. The effect is amazing; the high spots just disappear before your eyes!


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    The results really doesn't photograph well but after about 20 minutes work I had achieved a result that I was happy with. It will need skimming with filler and I'm sure with more time and skill you could get it even better but I keep reminding myself that this is just an old truck and making it look like a classic car would be ridiculous.
     
    andy_v and fatfranky like this.
  7. Angusdog

    Angusdog Well-meaning amateur

    Messages:
    724
    Location:
    Wellington, NZ
    And yet plenty of people do. It's a great project, nice to have something to practice techniques on without writing off a rare shell - the same reasoning behind me mucking around with Minis. They're plentiful enough that you can treat each one as a learning exercise.

    I'm impressed with the results from the metal shrinking disk and good to know it's worth factoring in a 9" grinder.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
  8. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    The great thing about doing an old British truck is that the bar is not set very high; they weren't very good new!

    The 9" grinder is pretty essential, not only because it give you something to hold on to but also you need some real horsepower (1900 watts or so) so that you can get heat into the panel quickly.
     
  9. norlander

    norlander Member

    Messages:
    3,390
    Location:
    Europe, mocycling paradise
    you bounder sir! we had Bedfords throughout my army service and they were great workhorses, we had the 4W drive versions.When I first joined it was the RL and and petrol engine and they went like stink when wound up.
    They were in service from the arctic in Norway to desert and the humidity of Malaya and we had them in Kenya too.
    Big Landrovers.
    Looking forward to seeing your project back on the road.
     
  10. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    It was meant in a rather lighthearted way; no offence intended. They are great old workhorses and we have done many a mile with that old girl. There are however parts of the design and build quality that leave one's eyes rolling skywards :-)
     
  11. norlander

    norlander Member

    Messages:
    3,390
    Location:
    Europe, mocycling paradise
    Thats British eccentricity:D.
     
  12. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    This month I have been mostly... sanding!


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    The front panel is as good as it needs to be and ready for primer. I also blasted the reinforcing beam that goes behind the panel.

    I will be interested how it turns out. Years ago I restored a Triumph Spitfire and although I thought I had been very thorough and careful when the topcoat went on it looked terrible. Every repair was plainly visible! We shall see...
     
    andy_v likes this.
  13. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    I am intending to paint the underside with the same topcoat as the rest of the cab: probably a 2-pack from International. What thoughts do folk have about in the wheel arches? Some sort of chip guard finish and if so which one? Many of roads in this part of the world are unsealed so the wheel arches take quite a battering.
     
  14. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    The new front panel needs its seams sealed so that moisture does not get between the layers so taking advice from this site I bought some of this:


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    As recommended, a chopped-off paint brush works well to apply this thick grey gunge.

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    The best technique seems to be to apply thickly with the brush, not worrying too much about how even it is but pushing well into the seam. Then using rubber gloves dip you fingers in GP thinners and smooth over the joint; it quickly makes a nice smooth finish.


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    The picture is not very good but shows the interior seam across the front of the floor pan. I think I went over that again with the thinners and got a better result after the picture was taken.
     
    andy_v likes this.
  15. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    The truck was originally dark blue and I don't see any reason to change that so being an engineer at heart I consulted BS5252 and found a nice shade called 18C53. I am intending to use a topcoat by International. It is a two-pack industrial polyurethane called Interthane 990. It is not an automotive paint but is recommended for offshore structures, chemical plants, pulp and paper mills and the power industry some I'm hoping it will be tough. It is meant to have a high gloss finish and has 'excellent long term durability and recoatability' so it should be just the ticket for an old truck.

    The online samples of the colour look nothing like the samples in the swatch book so it will be interesting to see what it actually looks like.
     
  16. diff01 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    mylesdw, I am following your thread with great interest. I've got a 1974 TK with a chev 292 six and 4 speed with split diff.

    My truck is very rough, but working (picked it up for next to nothing). It's a 7.5 tonne tipper and I use it frequently in my brickpaving/limestone wall business.

    Other than doing running repairs to keep it working, I haven't done anything about the body. One day...

    Really appreciating your thorough approach to your truck. It's a big job you've taken on. Well done so far.
     
  17. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    Thanks for that, a little feedback is always very welcome.

    I opened my new paint this weekend and it is nothing like the colour I wanted!! I was using a Resene BS5252 colour chart because I assumed it would be more accurate than the online representation of the colour. I was wrong. I am hoping that because what I want is a darker shade it can be re-tinted.
     
  18. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    Strangely enough, after it dried, my stirring stick was almost exactly the same colour as the chart; I did not realise how much it would darken on drying but I still don't like it much. I can only describe it as a boring blue, rather like that one that Audi use. After a chat with the very helpful guy from International I went back and by trial and error added 4Y of black tint to the mix. I can't remember what 'Y' stands for but it is the standard unit of measure for paint tinting machines and represents 1/48 of a fluid ounce. We added a shot, mixed the paint, added a bit more and so on. The result is much better and I have started spraying the cab with results that I can best call reasonable. I'll post pictures when I have some.
     
  19. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    677
    New Zealand
    When my trial paint had tried it was a lot closer to the colour chart but I still didn't like it! It was just too boring, rather like that colour that Audi uses so after a chat with the helpful guy from International I took it back to the supplier and we added an extra 4Y of black tint. I can't remember what 'Y' stands for but it is the unit of measure for paint tinting machines and represents 1/48 of a fluid ounce. The blue is now darker and greyer and much more to my liking.

    Like the primer it is quite easy to apply with little over spray. I find that mixing about half a litre at a time is enough so that I have to finish before I make too much of a mess. My spraying is a bit dodgy so I am concentrating on the bits that don't show much first, in the hope that I get a bit better as I go along.


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    [​IMG]Why do they sell thinners in a pot that is almost impossible to pour when it's full?



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    andy_v likes this.
  20. jpmillermatic

    jpmillermatic Member

    Messages:
    806
    USA-NY
    wow, most companies are usually pretty close to their color charts...unless the chart was very old, sun-faded, etc...

    You are making good progress!


    JP
     
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