Bedford TK

  1. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    Starting the doors

    I have started work on all the panels that need the same treatment as the cab: blasting and priming. I have bought some more plastic and clips so that I can seal my plastic tent better to try and stop the blasting sand getting everywhere. There are a number of panels to do and I think I can complete them in two batches.

    The original doors are very rusty; the mirror mounts had pushed right through the door skin so last time I was at the wreckers I bought a couple of better ones.

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    My understanding is that there are two styles of door. These later ones have two mirror mountings: top and bottom. The early doors had mirrors on a single arm and only one mounting.

    I dismantled and photographed the doors.

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    They came apart quite easily and of course I will have another set of parts from the original doors. It would be nice to get new rubbers but I have not seen any for sale. I scan eBay regularly for TK parts and although there are always plenty of bits for sale the actual range of components is quite limited. Windscreen rubbers are easily available but the rest are not.

    Once the blasting and priming is complete I will move on to any welding and rust repair that is needed. These were the best doors I could find but still some minor rusting on the inner skin. It will be interesting to see what they look like after blasting.

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    andy_v likes this.
  2. samc88 Member

    I know paddockspares sell door seal rubber (for series land rovers) on the roll so it can fit whatever size and shape door you want. I dont know if that would do or if it needs to be a hevier duty and larger rubber for the tk, perhaps theres other places that sell door seal rubber on the roll?

    Oh and nice project :) My granddad used to drive lorries for a living (mainly for british steel and a few haulage firms) and drove a couple of these
     
  3. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    Thanks Sam, I'll take a look at paddockspares. It is quite a soft foamy rubber and it simply glues into the channel right around the door. Some of the corners are quite tight so I'm not sure if off the roll rubber would work.
     
  4. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    The sandblaster was making very heavy weather of the cab doors so I have changed my approach and used these pads on my grinder quickly to remove large flat areas of paint.

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    These do a great job as long as you remember to move about so that heat does not build up in the panel. The first door is pretty much rust free.

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    [​IMG]



    The only repairs needed are on the inside front lower corner.

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    Once I had cut this out you can see a rust trap created by the inner panel that carries the door hinge captive nuts.

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    Although the inner brace it rusted away below the hinges it is all still very solid so I am not going to worry too much about repairing it. The card on the left is my repair template for the inner door. There are also some other tiny holes in this area which I am not sure how to deal to best so I have run a drill through them for now:
     
    andy_v and EAZEE like this.
  5. jpmillermatic

    jpmillermatic Member

    Messages:
    715
    USA-NY
    Looking good...Ill have to find one of those purple discs if I can....

    For the pin holes, I have used a flattened copper pipe held behind the hole and plug welded the holes full.

    JP
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 18, 2013
  6. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
  7. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    Patching the doors

    After blasting I found rust holes on both the inner and outer skins of the first door. Using a 1mm cutting disc I removed the damaged area. I left the edge of the door in place because it seemed sound and because it is formed around a radius which would have been difficult (for me) to repeat.

    Here is the hole I cut together with the piece that came out. Repairing the rusty inner parts of the door would have meant much more cutting and I'm not sure of the benefit. After a bit of head-scratching I blasted it clean and gave it a coat of the rust paint.

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    I used the damaged cut-out as a template for a new piece of 18 swg steel. The welding magnet does a great job of holding the the patch flush with the surface.

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    Out with the trusty MIG and a grinder fitted with a flap-wheel and a result that I'm very satisfied with. It will take very little filler to finish that ready for paint

    [​IMG]
     
    andy_v likes this.
  8. samc88 Member

    Heres a link

    http://www.paddockspares.com/br2367m-door-rubber-on-the-roll-per-metre.html

    As I say its for series land rovers so dont know if it will be the right size width ways for the TK (could be wrong, I've never really looked at lorry rubbers)

    What I will do tomorrow is take a photo or 2 with a ruler so you can get an idea of the dimensions of the rubber if that will help?
     
  9. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    That would be great, there's no great hurry, quite a while before I get to putting stuff back together. The picture above of the rusty inner door corner shows the tightest radius that the rubber would need to do
     
  10. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    Both doors had a small area on the lower corner of the inner to repair.

    This I patched in the same way as the outer but changed the MIG wire (and tip) from 0.8mm to 0.6mm. This makes a lot of difference because it allows the MIG to run at its lowest power and makes welding thin sheet a lot easier and neater.
     
    • P1010857.jpg
  11. samc88 Member

    Seal photos,

    Width
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Depth
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    Tightest radius I could get whilst still getting a smooth curve (no creases) in the rubber

    [​IMG]
     
    andy_v likes this.
  12. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    Thanks for that. Rather as I thought, the corner radii are way tighter than that. If I get the chance I'll grab some pictures of the rubber and cross section.
     
  13. darren.a.roberts Member

    Messages:
    113
    Cambridge
    Love the textbook patch - very good and you make it look so easy! Great resto btw - I keep looking forward to the updates and the finished beast!
     
  14. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    Thanks for the kind words Darren, a little encouragement goes a long way! The quality of my work is very variable; that was a good bit!


    One of the doors had further damage that needed repair:

    [​IMG]

    The door stay had been ripped out of the door bending and cracking the inner panel that strengthens the hinge. Without the door stay, the door will get damaged the first time the wind catches it so it needed repair. I cut out a section of the door jam with the grinder and hammered the damaged metal back into place.

    Then I welded up the cracks and put a bead right around the hole to thicken and strengthen it.

    [​IMG]

    Then I welded the cut section back.
    [​IMG]
     
    andy_v likes this.
  15. jpmillermatic

    jpmillermatic Member

    Messages:
    715
    USA-NY
    great stuff...glad you are bringing this old truck back to life!

    JP
     
  16. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    The damaged door also had some cracks through the inner skin. I was wondering whether to put in some patches to stiffen it up but in the end just welded the cracks up and it all seems pretty rigid.
     
    • P1010863.jpg
    • P1010864.jpg
  17. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    Front Quarter Panels

    The small front quarter panels where the headlights mount were in good condition on the original cab although they took quite a bit of drilling and cutting to get off. I'm pretty sure they are replacement panels.

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    After stripping and knocking out some minor dents there was one repair job to do.

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    The lug that bolts the panel to the grill bar was missing and the panel has been welded to the grill bar. It should look like this:

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    I used the good side to make a template (it's a mirror image!)

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    Then welded in place.
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    andy_v likes this.
  18. jpmillermatic

    jpmillermatic Member

    Messages:
    715
    USA-NY
    very methodical..nice work.

    JP
     
  19. samc88 Member

    Looking good :)
     
  20. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    660
    New Zealand
    The panel that forms the whole front of the cab below the windscreen is the worst part of my new cab. It is dented on one corner, repaired in the middle and rusted along the lower edge. For this reason I plan to replace it with the panel from the old cab which seemed to be better.

    Removing it was no mean task with nearly 200 spot welds to drill out!

    [​IMG]

    he panel is quite solid but after stripping I found that quite a bit of repair work lurked under filler. I still think that it is better than the alternative.

    Both the front lower corners have small rusty areas.

    [​IMG]
    Rust holes with outline for patch panel drawn.

    Cut out for patch and new metal welded in. If you have not discovered flap wheels (on a small grinder) for dressing welds they are simply brilliant: far better and quicker than a grind wheel.

    [​IMG]
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    andy_v likes this.
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