Very first steps! Haven't even turned the thing on yet.

  1. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    I did have a bit of a fire, so it's a bit of a mess :whistle:
    Maybe I should have removed the rubber bits on my work bench?
    Can you tell much from this picture? IMG_3154.jpeg
     
  2. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    My mask darkness range (???) is 9 to 13.
    I see you can get some that are 5 to 13. Is this a bad idea for MIG?
     
  3. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,672
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    All that white stuff on the panel is zinc which has been burned by the welding. It's good that you are welding outside and there's not much of it but still take care not to breathe it if you can because some people are more susceptible than others so you never know how it will affect you. You'll know if you get affected because you'll suffer flu-like symptoms. It's called metal fume fever.
     
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  4. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    Oh dear.
    Should i have removed the paint on the other side too?
     
  5. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Always better/safer to work on clean metal.
     
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  6. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,672
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Well it would have prevented that fire from the blob of body sealer.

    Don't panic, it looks like there's only a very thin coating on there and as you're outside it's unlikely that you've breathed much if any at all. I've done whole shifts grinding welds on heavy galv stuff with no effect but you should know about it. Just something to watch out for.
     
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  7. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    Ok great.
    Will do. I didn't even think about the back (seems daft now)
    Thanks.
     
  8. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,672
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    TBH grinding that zinc coating can be as much of a hazard as welding it. I'd find some clean material.

    If there's any sheet metal work/fabrication companies nearby you might ask them for scraps from the guillotine. Explain that you need it for welding practice and even say that you'll bring it back when you've welded on it and throw it back in the scrap bin, that way they still get the value from the scrap man.

    What part of London are you in?
     
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  9. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    I'm in Streatham.
    I've ordered some scraps off eBay. I like the idea of taking it back. There is a place near me that might be perfect
     
  10. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    6,587
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Looks like a Golf MkIV wing, probably nearer 0.75mm than 1.5mm thick. Nice even beads for a first go with gasless wire on thin sheet, you will notice a difference if you go to solid wire and Argon/Co2 mix gas. :thumbup:
     
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  11. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    What about getting a mask that can be set to be lighter? Is that dangerous? Mine is 9 to 13?
     
  12. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    Thanks!
     
  13. LewisT Member

    Messages:
    117
    central scotland
    my mask is dual range i tried mig on the lower range and ended up with bright spots in my vision for a few mins after welding pretty sure its for low amp tig.
     
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  14. bourbon Member

    Messages:
    583
    Location:
    Lichfield UK
    Slightly Off topic. But does anyone else think that the surface of the wing looks a bit like Zimmerit? the stuff they used to put on German ww2 tanks...……………...or is it just me?
     
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  15. The helmet brightness is up to you. If you are fairly young, you can probably tolerate a brighter setting because your eyes will quickly recover from the light. As we get older, the recovery takes much longer so we would be blinded by a setting you would find OK. Even at the brightest setting, there is no arceye risk.
     
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  16. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    I think the problem is i'm no spring chicken anymore!
    I have to wear reading glasses, which isn't a problem. But i do find it harder to see in the dark. Maybe a mask that goes down to 5 would be better.
     
  17. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    I had to google this, but yes, you are right. Maybe I should do a whole car!
     
  18. PaulaT

    PaulaT Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    London UK
    That doesn't sound too scary. But maybe the lowest of the lower range should be avoided
     
  19. bourbon Member

    Messages:
    583
    Location:
    Lichfield UK
    You will certainly get your practice in then! LOL
     
  20. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,672
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Paula the shade doesn't protect your eyes from the harmful UV light so the worst that can happen is that you'll be temporarily affected by the brightness of you go too low on the shade. UV protection is always there and doesn't change with shade.

    I have a spaceview helmet which is dual range and goes down to shade 5. It has a nice clear screen and larger viewing panel and costs just over 100 quid. Miles better than the normal auto-dark screens.
     
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