Large Drummond Restoration

  1. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

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  2. KaneH Member

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    United Kingdom
    Must have missed that one Seadog! Thanks for the link :thumbup:

    Will take a look at removing the motor from the stand over the coming weeks to see what I’m facing.
     
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  3. Pete.

    Pete. Member

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    The star point is usually very accessible since they would have had access to each of the six ends to test the windings before the final binding and varnish. It might even be directly under that square black post plate. If the star point is bound into the winding make sure that you re-bind it after making your new connections or the windings will be liable to rub together from electrical vibration when it's in use.
     
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  4. KaneH Member

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    With a couple of projects out of the garage I’ve managed an hour or so on the lathe. Originally the plan was to get it up and running as soon as possible but with it now mostly stripped it seems like a good opportunity to go over it more thoroughly.

    Tailstock dismantled this evening and the cross slide was mostly done yesterday. Roughly cleaned up with spirits but still a lot to go. Can anyone recommend the best procedure for stripping grease, grime, paint and whatever else in preparation for paint? I’ve got a few clean and strip disks for the grinder there which will no doubt do the trick but not feasible in the evening due to noise.

    Finally it feels like some of the garage projects are moving forward after the house move earlier in the year :clapping: you never know the old Peugeot might get some long awaited attention soon :laughing:
     
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  5. spencer 427 Member

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    6,925
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    uk colchester
    There is not a all in one cleaning process with machinery restorations. I use a combination of different processes to get the desired result. If you look at a few of my threads its explained in there.
    My new Harrison lathe.
    Empire lathe.
    But basically all parts are stripped and cleaned in gunk cleaner. This will dissolve the grease oil.
    Old painted parts go in to a tub of hot caustic soda. This will remove any paint.
    Non painted parts go in to hot citric acid tub.
    This will remove any rust. I sometimes use a fine scotchbrite pad to help remove any stubborn bits of rust while it's in the acid.
    Once that's done I the do any repairs to the parts. Bruising off the threads. File work ect.
    Then it's a combination of wire tools and duck oil to get them how I want them. 20191120_141522.jpg 20191126_140313.jpg 20190902_121647.jpg 20191123_133938.jpg
     
  6. KaneH Member

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    197
    United Kingdom
    Great, thanks Spencer. I’ll have a read up. Some great results you’ve achieved on your restorations!

    One other question - what primer and paint products have you used on your empire?
     
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  7. spencer 427 Member

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    6,925
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    uk colchester
    Also forgot to mention.
    I dont put compound slides or cross slides in the citric. I always do these by hand. Chucks. Bolts. Washers. Nut and fittings go in citric. As much as citric is good if you make the mixture strong a leave parts in there to long it will eat in to cast parts.
     
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  8. spencer 427 Member

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    6,925
    Location:
    uk colchester
    Thanks kane.
    I use enamel primer and enamel top coat. All parts are hand painted. The enamel paints I use are easy to work with and give a good hard finish. Only thing with enamel paints is if you try and use rollers it will eat them. I am sure there are rollers for enamel based paints. If you want details of the paints let me know.
     
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  9. spencer 427 Member

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    6,925
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    It takes a lot of time to get the parts how I want them. Sometimes days just to do a batch of parts. But I enjoy doing it and having peace of mind knowing that everything is working as should and if I need to strip it down again it makes the job a lot easier. I am parts cleaning today so I might do a separate thread on the total cleaning process.
     
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  10. KaneH Member

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    If you get the time that would be an excellent resource for the forum I’m sure :thumbup:
     
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  11. KaneH Member

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    Not a particularly exciting update but finally got round to buying some caustic soda for stripping / cleaning parts and managed to get a large container for what I thought was decent money (£20) from Asda. Couldn’t find anything of a similar size for less than about twice that. Maybe covid is causing the hike.

    Lashed up a tray that I can suspend in the solution once I get a batch of parts ready so should be ready to give It a bash once I’ve cleared a few jobs around the house that I’ve been tasked with. Feckin DIY is taking over life in lockdown!
     
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  12. KaneH Member

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    197
    United Kingdom
    Lifted the motor and gear off the stand earlier to see about getting the wiring side of things sorted but am struggling with the pin that retains the fan on the end of the shaft. Tried punching it out but is very soft so presumably a tapered pin? Any suggestions on how to remove without mullering the pin?
     
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  13. KaneH Member

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    197
    United Kingdom
    Fan, cover and other gubbins off revealing the motor windings and the three tails currently connected to star configuration. It looks as though there may be the other wires hidden under the wrapping / varnish judging by the thickness of it. I presume the 3 additional wires needing extending up into the cover plate will be loose and not connected to each other / anything else? Any recommendations of reading material on the subject would be welcome :thumbup:
     
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  14. Agroshield Member

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    929
    The three wires in the connection box are each one end of the three motor coils. The other three coil ends ARE joined together and form the star point. The star point is what you are looking for. It will be three wires all coming together at one place. You have to locate this, separate the three wires, extend and sleeve them (inside the motor body heatproof wire - the fabric covered stuff - is best. An old domestic oven is a free source) and bring them out to the connection box.

    It is possible that the star point could be at the other end of the motor.

    If you put an Ohm meter on any two of the wires you have, it will tell you the resistance of two coils in series. All three possibilities should read the same. When you locate the star point, you will then have three pairs with continuity between them and the resistance will be half the previous reading.

    Recommended books:

    https://archive.org/details/16electricmotors. (you do need the dot in the URL)

    https://archive.org/details/24electricmotorsinthehomeworkshop
     
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  15. KaneH Member

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    197
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for the links. I’ll report back when I get into it. Fingers crossed the star point isn’t at the opposite end of the motor as it was a pig getting it stripped to this point!
     
  16. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

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    NE London - UK
    You'll probably end up removing more insulation that you expect to, especially as this looks to have been coated in a high voltage varnish. Glass fibre insulation, binding string and everything else you may need can be bought from Brocott - http://brocott.co.uk/electrical-insulation/
     
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