Large Drummond Restoration

  1. KaneH Member

    Messages:
    163
    United Kingdom
    As some of you are away I picked up a fairly sizeable Drummond lathe a week or so ago. I had a spare hour last night to headed out to start the strip down, mainly to get some more weight off of it to make lifting off the trailer a little easier.

    Managed to remove the headstock and some miscellaneous items, oh and grabbed a couple of photos while I was there.

    I’ve got a 2 tonne engine crane coming over the weekend so all being well I’ll at least have it off the trailer and on the ground. Going to cobble together a dolly to move it around temporarily until I’ve the time to get material to make up a more permanent stand for it.

    From the photo you’ll see a second plaque above the original Drummond noting Thos W Ward Ltd, Sheffield. Supplied and reconditioned by Silvertown works. So it appears it may spent some time at the ship breakers. Anybody got any more info on the Ward Company or Silvertown Works?

    Updates to follow...

    Edit: is there such a thing as a lathe restoration guide? Example of how things come apart etc? Will probably save a lot of head scratching!
     
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    dobbslc, fizzy, slim_boy_fat and 3 others like this.
  2. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

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    8,967
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    a nice tidy lathe there

    it looks like you have a removable piece near the head of the machine and the bed dosnt look like its got much wear in it

    if they are oily caps on head id probably try to change them once going to oilers you can see how much oil you got in them suspect they are grease though

    so whens your dad getting involved in helping you out then ?

    from pic it he looked a little bemused at what you got
     
  3. MattF

    MattF Member

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    9,917
    Location:
    South Yorkshire, England
    They're oilers on the headstock. There'll likely be an oil cavity/reservoir with a wick feeding to the bearing in each upright of the headstock.
     
  4. KaneH Member

    Messages:
    163
    United Kingdom
    Not sure about the oilers will have to check. You’re right, I noticed that there is a small separate section of the rack towards the headstock that is removable and going by the joint on the bed this should come away too.

    Don’t think the old boy will be getting involved. He’s been duped into helping out with too many old cars to get caught out again :whistle:

    Being a joiner he’s more partial to woodwork but did say once it’s up and running he’ll be down to have a play. Think he used to enjoy lathe work back in his younger days at the school.

    Going to try another hour this evening to get the carriage dismantled if I can. Any tips?
     
  5. MattF

    MattF Member

    Messages:
    9,917
    Location:
    South Yorkshire, England
    Are there any screws through the saddle to the apron? Apron off usually requires removing the footstock end leadscrew bracket.
     
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  6. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

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    8,967
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  7. KaneH Member

    Messages:
    163
    United Kingdom
    Matt, it looked as though the lower part of the carriage unbolts beneath the feed rod (?). I didn’t see any large screws/bolts going through elsewhere though. More photos tonight I think will help!

    The bracket at the end of the lathe that holds the lead screw and feed rod is integral to the main body so the carriage can’t slide off the end of the bed I don’t think. Is this common? Others I’ve seen have the bracket bolted on to the main body.

    Yep Gaz, standard 7inch. Not quite as many accessories as your man on lathes.co.uk has mind you!
     
  8. spencer 427

    spencer 427 Member

    Messages:
    6,272
    uk colchester
    Location:
    uk colchester
    Nice looking lathe. One thing to look for when taking them apart is sometimes there are bolts...grub screws that are covered in crud or are recessed so you can't see em... and the key ways get rusty making shafts a pig to get out .
     
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  9. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    9,697
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Would assume the apron is in two parts. Top and bottom. Bottom drops off and allows the top to slide off the dovetails tailstock end.
    Any bolts hidden in the t slots?

    Scratch that. Was looking at the pics on lathes.co.uk. Yours is different.
     
  10. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,696
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    The apron seems to be a one piece casting, but the photo doesn't really show enough detail.
    There is very likely a plate at the rear of the apron, under the shear which holds it down. That will need to be removed. Also it seems likely that both the feed screw and control rod may need to come off before the apron can be lifted off. But this is all just a guess :D
     
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  11. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    Took me a few evenings to get my apron off. Easy once you know how. :)
     
  12. KaneH Member

    Messages:
    163
    United Kingdom
    Had an hour or so out at it again this evening and made some progress. Removed some bits off the top of the carriage, the lead screw and removed the plate from underside which exposed the control rod gear where it meshes inside the carriage. After removing a few other bolts I thought great it should just lift up off of the bed...

    did it fark! :fighting::whistle:

    The only thing that’s stopping the whole thing lifting off now is the cog that runs along the rack which controls the travel of the carriage.

    My initial thought was to remove the small portion of rack towards the headstock end where the bed is removable and wind the carriage all the way down until the cog passed the end of the rack. No luck, I got the two screws out no bother but there’s two locating dowels/pins holding it in place which I can seem to release the rack from.

    Tried the same with the longer section of rack but no luck there either. Then thought about removing that full section of the bed that comes out. Again bolts out no bother but it was stuck solid, almost as though it shouldn’t come out! With the kids sleeping upstairs I didn’t want to start bashing so have left it for tonight.

    Any suggestions on how to proceed would be appreciated!

    And some photos...
     
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  13. fizzy Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,945
    uk
    Is it off the trailer now?
    Sorry if I am stating the obvious and trying to teach granny to suck eggs but please don't be tempted to move the engine crane when the lathe is hanging on it. Not even an inch! Pull the trailer out instead. Seen too many people trying that stunt!
     
  14. KaneH Member

    Messages:
    163
    United Kingdom
    No, still on the trailer. Saturday morning when the engine crane is coming. Plan is to wheel the trailer outside, lift off and move trailer away then drop onto a makeshift platform on castors. Need to be able to move it around in the garage until I’ve rearranged things. Doubt I’d have much chance wheeling the crane about with it in the air as I’ve a monoblock drive.
     
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  15. fizzy Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,945
    uk
    Good stuff.
    Remember as well that a normal 2 ton engine crane is only rated at that close in - with the jib extended down to 500 or even 250kg.
    Hopefully will be fine as you have stripped it down a lot.
    Looking forward to seeing the pictures as you go.
     
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  16. spencer 427

    spencer 427 Member

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    6,272
    uk colchester
    Location:
    uk colchester
    Strip the remaining parts off the cross slide. Take the other shaft out. Looks a stout machine . Also when taking pictures of parts for us to see you need to highlight the erea .what I do is use a small torch held just to the right of my phone. This will make better pictures.
     
  17. KaneH Member

    Messages:
    163
    United Kingdom
    Seems fairly robust and most of the fasteners have come out without too much bother :D

    No problem Spencer. Is what I suggested by removing the rack the standard process of lifting the carriage off or is there a way to remove the pinion?

    Noted on the lighting. iPhone produces some terrible quality pictures, even with the flash so will try get some additional lighting :thumbup:
     
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  18. spencer 427

    spencer 427 Member

    Messages:
    6,272
    uk colchester
    Location:
    uk colchester
    You shouldn't have to remove the rack. Take the other feed shaft out. Strip the cross slide down. Can you take a picture of the rear of the carriage. Need to see how it attaches to the lathe bed.
     
  19. spencer 427

    spencer 427 Member

    Messages:
    6,272
    uk colchester
    Location:
    uk colchester
    Need to see the underside of that Screenshot_20190308-070737_Chrome.jpg
     
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  20. KaneH Member

    Messages:
    163
    United Kingdom
    The feed shaft looks like it is a pressed pin that holds the end on whereas the lead screw was a threaded nut with grub screw. That’s the main reason I avoided removing it last night.

    Rear of the carriage is free. There was a metal bracket fixed up to the underside using three bolts. If you look at the third picture of my post from last night at 1035pm it shows the rectangular bracket sat atop the bedways

    Edit: second picture shows the pinion on the rack that’s stopping me from lifting off the whole assembly
     
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