Workshop and life hints, tips, tricks, safety and best practice

  1. Robbie260 Member

    Messages:
    722
    Location:
    Scotland highland
    That reminds me steel wool is very good tinder material and will usually even light when wet.
     
    jerrytug likes this.
  2. Wany Member

    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    Gloucester, UK
    You can light fine steel wool with a 9V battery
     
  3. arther dailey Member

    Messages:
    3,740
    Location:
    Southampton England
    Probably !! there was a factory we did the shut down for , the maintainance were grease gun happy, you would take the end shield of to be greated by it being full of grease , and jammed in the windings , even after telling them to cut back one or more of there guys new better, next year all came in the same , spoke to my boss and agreed to fit double shielded bearings to all motors (sealed for life) and aspot of weld to block the grease channel, after that apart from the comment came back that maintaince had apparantly complained that although they changed nipples but were strugggling to get "enough" grease into the bearings ,next shut down motors were clean inside and no problems , in the mean time none had burnt out ,which I geuss was shooting ourselves in the foot some what...
    a further note, years later running a merc 307d doing transport, had a front wheel bearing getting loud, so stopped at merc agent andover, they took hub of and called me over, no grease in bearing, mech said well I geuss your xxxyear and about 100k on the clock, yes ? was my reply , well weve have had a spat of these seems someone on nightshift didnt load bearings with grease , but they all have lasted about same mileage. interesting eh, no grease in it what so ever apart from tiny makers amount. yes I had all hubs of that afternoon.the rest were fine
     
    jerrytug and Robbie260 like this.
  4. Feet 'n Inches

    Feet 'n Inches Out of the rat-race at last

    Messages:
    109
    Location:
    Devon, England
    Having watched others (and having done it myself :vsad: ) drilling a fair length of steel with a large sized bit on a pillar or radial drill only to have it rotate rapidly in a clockwise direction on breakthrough, I would say:

    1) Always clamp your workpiece securely to the drill table or vice, ensuring the vice is also suitably clamped,
    and/or
    2) Rest the length of steel against the side of the pillar of the drill thus reducing the risk of snatch and unwanted travel that could cause injury.
     
    jerrytug, barking mat, Wany and 2 others like this.
  5. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,623
    Location:
    Moray
    Don't hold any workpiece on a pillar drill with your hands. Regardless of size, material, size of hole, depth of hole etc etc. Just don't. You can buy a clamp or workholding device for almost everything. Or make one. You can't buy new hands or fingers. Or make them. Well at least not easily.
     
    jerrytug, Wany, James1979 and 4 others like this.
  6. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,939
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    Don't use an angle grinder near windows.
    (And definitely DAMHIKT :ashamed: )
     
    Robbie260, barking mat and Wany like this.
  7. Lewis_RX8

    Lewis_RX8 Member

    Messages:
    219
    Location:
    Scotland
    Have you had any rusty PVC outside window sills.

    Mine seem to have little bits of metal stuck in almost as if they where hot and landed on plastic and melted in.


    No clue how that happened,,, :whistle:
     
  8. Wany Member

    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    Gloucester, UK
    That would explain the marks on the window by the garage. I thought them odd, almost like lichen growing on the glass. I will not be letting my wife know that I now know what they are from...
     
    bigegg and Robbie260 like this.
  9. jsf55

    jsf55 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    466
    Location:
    Sunny Swansea
    We had one electrical engineer that was greasing the motors every block of 4 !! yep full to the brim when it went for service.
    Best failure i had was the hydraulic pump front seal failing, filling the sealed bell housing and forcing it part the front seal of the drive motor, actually had oil squirting out of the glands !! Electrical supervisor asked if i had been smoking something when i phone him :laughing::laughing::laughing:
     
    Robbie260 likes this.
  10. RichardM Member

    I have T-Cut mine before to solve this problem - must be red ants causing it ;)
     
    Wany and bigegg like this.
  11. Lewis_RX8

    Lewis_RX8 Member

    Messages:
    219
    Location:
    Scotland
    Tried that as well , Worked good.

    Until i did some more grinding that is
     
    Wany likes this.
  12. CornishPete Member

    Messages:
    456
    Location:
    Huddersfield
    Your workshops have a lot of rules! My garage is a common sense zone with just a few rules but they are so comprehensive they cover every conceivable situation;

    Rule 1) Anyone that enters it enters at their own risk but safe in the knowledge that everything in there is fully operational and functional, unless it isn't.

    Rule 2) Everything has the potential to cause you harm so if you're gonna be dumb you'd better be tough.

    If anyone can think of something I've missed please let me know.
     
  13. Lewis_RX8

    Lewis_RX8 Member

    Messages:
    219
    Location:
    Scotland
    One that is helpfull most of the time but hard to put in practise 100% is.

    Only put your hands where you can see them


    If you can see them would hope you are able to see anything that may cause danger or harm to them but sometimes isn't possible.
     
    Arc Tourist, jerrytug and Robbie260 like this.
  14. jerrytug

    jerrytug Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    653
    Location:
    Isle of Wight
    Or a customer's glassfibre yacht :p
     
    Wany and bigegg like this.
  15. rtcosic

    rtcosic Member

    Acid based wheel cleaner like Wonder Wheels is fine on glass. Good for ceramic wall tiles as well - (also DNAMHIKT)

    PVC and other potentially sensitive surfaces use a chelating product such as Iron.X. I shudder to think how much would be needed for an entire fibreglass yacht.

    Obviously these remove the metal but leave you with clean pits that won't rust.
     
    Robbie260, jerrytug and bigegg like this.
  16. Arc Tourist

    Arc Tourist Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,413
    Location:
    California & Wales
    Think I've posted this safety tip before. Back when I was a student in the 1960's, my Metal Shop teacher had a common sense approach to safety, and one of them was a simple device he made and installed to insure that students couldn't turn on the drill press without the chuck key being removed from the chuck.

    I'm not an artist, but here is a rough sketch of the device which should be self explanatory.
    . PICT0001 (Medium).JPG
     
    Robbie260, rtcosic, mpats and 6 others like this.
  17. rtcosic

    rtcosic Member

    Our workshop ceiling would have benefitted from one of those fitted to the lathes. No, it really wasn't me, but I saw it coming and ducked!
     
    Robbie260, Arc Tourist and dobbslc like this.
  18. Robbie260 Member

    Messages:
    722
    Location:
    Scotland highland
    Yep never leave a chuck key in a lathe. If you forgot college the instructor would come along pick it up and drop it in the coolant sump, or throw it at you.
     
Advertisements