What’s your favorite wire?

  1. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    12,052
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    Hi Henry, the one I posted above that has the bad porosity was done in overhead position, I am still however putting it down to wire or possibly gas rather than position as I did another at the same time with the EWM and Esab wire and it came out good, well my position of the torch wasn't the best on one run but otherwise ok, see pic, possibly a speckle or two in them. ScreenHunter_1627 Jun. 04 07.12.jpg .
     
  2. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,704
    Location:
    Essex
    I think looking at your bead profiles Hood you weld quite hot but there’s a lot of reinforcement so perhaps your keeping the aluminium in the cooling phase where hydrogen can escape for longer hence the lack of porosity.
     
  3. richmig New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    wales
    Because I am on a tight budget, and only have a smallish machine, Clarke 120 from memory, and weld mainly light stuff and cars etc., I use the cheapest 0.6mm wire on the big rolls. I have tried 0.8 but got better results with the 0.6. I have tried welding alloy with this machine but got poor results mainly because of what I was trying to repair, a cracked alloy sump, and probably the wrong gas, the very small bottle that only seemed to last 10 mins.

    I am very pleased with the Clarke machine which is great for car steel and light stuff. I will one day set up for alloy welding when money allows.
     
  4. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    12,052
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    I would certainly agree with that as I do like to weld Alu hot when compared to others that I know. Whether that is good or bad I don't know but I can say it is very rare that I have to repair my own Alu welds.
     
  5. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,704
    Location:
    Essex
    Well aluminium likes a bit of heat the only danger is the loss of yield strength in the haz which can be much larger with excessive heat input.
     
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  6. Richard.

    Richard. Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    18,351
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    In an ideal world leg should be pretty close to material gage
    If not you should travel faster really. 12B451B1-19E8-45B3-BAA1-17A46D37CEF8.jpeg Distances A and B should be fairly similar until you get down to gages like 2mm or smaller where the process simply doesn’t allow you to get a leg that small.
    The other side is very good and more even
     
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  7. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    12,052
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    Yes I screwed up on torch angle on the one side both were overhead welds BTW.
     
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  8. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    12,052
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    Would the HAZ be the lighter coloured part on the etches?
     
  9. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,704
    Location:
    Essex
    You can’t see the full extent of the HAZ on aluminium with a macro etch afaik. Aluminium isn’t like steels where you get defined phase changes in the HAZ.
    In steel you get the wrought structure in the weld, the coarse grain in the immediate HAZ, small band of martensite and then back to the refined grain structure of the parent steel.

    In aluminium because of the cooling rate you don’t see such definition.
     
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  10. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

    Messages:
    7,958
    Location:
    Rotherham
    hopefully, you wont get martensite
     
  11. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,704
    Location:
    Essex
    Well ideally no but it can happen and does if the cooling rate is too fast. A Very thin band of martensite.
     
  12. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

    Messages:
    7,958
    Location:
    Rotherham
    yes but only on susceptible steels, not mild steel
     
  13. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,704
    Location:
    Essex
    Oh yeah, mild steel will be fine, I’m thinking more in the realm of high strength and low alloy steels.
     
  14. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,704
    Location:
    Essex
    A cool info graphic from alcotec.
     
    • 4B0570D6-5717-4510-8916-3717985A4D0B.jpeg
    • 23FC5CA7-F8DB-45AC-8203-D94CD0BD1363.jpeg
  15. owas

    owas Member

    Messages:
    1,875
    Location:
    Birmingham
    i think theyve realised just how awful the super 6 wire was, theres half a roll left on my machine,im scrapping it.
     
    • 20180605_100401.jpg
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  16. Liquid Metal

    Liquid Metal Member

    Messages:
    467
    Location:
    Essex, UK
    One that used at a previous job, was an Esab wire. Silicon coated rather than copper, and ot ran superbly in spray transfer, hardly any popping, tips would last ages before being too worn, and gave a real smooth bead shape. Im sure it was number 12.50, or 12.51.
    As far as flux core goes, the only two ive tried wer both murex, 1.2mm. One was B55 basic wire, the other was RX56 which i think was a rutile cored wired. The Rx56 was brilliant positionally, lovely amd smooth, same settings in most positions if i remember rightly. The B55 not as nice positionally but not such a heavy slag layer.
     
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  17. Richard.

    Richard. Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    18,351
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    It will be 12.50 or 12.63.
     
  18. Liquid Metal

    Liquid Metal Member

    Messages:
    467
    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Must have been 12.50 then.
    Had no copper coating, just silicon coated i think
     
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  19. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,704
    Location:
    Essex
    Yes Aristorod 12.50. Was our premium wire. We now have Purus but that lends itself to mechanisation.
    The 12.50 is an awesome wire. On a pulse machine it runs beautifully.

    As you say it uses a proprietary surface lubricant rather than copper coating so you get less fume and a very stable arc.

    Also made to a tighter specification that 12.51 which is a run of the mill G3Si1 (SG2 under old standards)

    aristorod 12.63 is G4Si1 (SG3)
     
  20. zeppelin builder

    zeppelin builder Member

    Messages:
    1,501
    Location:
    peoples republic of scotland
    could be moisture or contaminants in the void . possibly Allys alloys wire
     
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