Urgent advice needed: Structural welds on residential steelwork

  1. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    9,971
    Location:
    Kent
    hire a genie lift one genie will do that
     
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  2. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    9,971
    Location:
    Kent
    Similar thing chunkier rsj 6m span.
    That's true what is done is done. No going back
     
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  3. gaz1

    gaz1 Member

    Messages:
    11,327
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    genie lift here as well

    also had them going up 3 floors fit the beams first floor lift the genie lift to next floor level fit next set of beams then lift again for the last floor

    2 people can carry a genie lift up the flight of stairs

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  4. That is shocking, absolutely no excuse for workmanship of such a poor standard. The thing is, it will cost far more to repair than to do it right in the first place
     
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  5. mtt.tr

    mtt.tr Member

    Messages:
    4,041
    Essex England
    As is always the way.
     
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  6. Mark 2

    Mark 2 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    488
    Location:
    London UK
    Anti- structural is what that is.
     
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  7. angellonewolf

    angellonewolf Member

    Messages:
    5,653
    Location:
    bristol england
    only saving grace is you spotted it keepmore of an eye on things now
     
  8. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

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    6,469
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    A digger would lift 500 kg no problem
     
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  9. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    2,503
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    saving grace is that if im looking at it correctly , its been jointed like it was post and beam , so the weld is actually doing very little of the supporting , the slots the beam has been set into will do that , really what there is of the welds are only stopping the beam from flopping about , a decent welder should sort that out without too much bother. Be glad you caught it now though.
     
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  10. dannyp Member

    it's easy enough to fix that, do enough of fixing ********* like that theer are some useless welders about.

    if theres nothing about that can catch fire its an easy fix, rock up with engine drive blow the pigeon muck away witah air arc and fill it back up, then get traumatised when you find out the first guy charged more
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 21, 2020
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  11. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    10,394
    Location:
    Essex
    I can’t see why the structural engineer has specified expansion bolts and designed the connection that way.

    Anyhow, that is the drawing and that is how it should be made.
     
  12. mtt.tr

    mtt.tr Member

    Messages:
    4,041
    Essex England
    It'll be using his known connections, a number of domestic based SE don't know much about steel connection
     
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  13. dobbslc

    dobbslc Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    5,737
    Location:
    Hertfordshire UK
    That was me!
    @Brad93 came round and sorted out some bad welds for me after the builders 'mate' did a bodge job on my extension. I spotted it soon enough and told them it wasn't staying like that!
    It was a plate welded to the bottom of the beam to support the ends of the joists at the back of the house.
    They hadn't cleaned the steel before welding and had welded over the paint! It wasn't as bad as yours though! They didn't have a fire extinguisher either!
    Brad cleaned it up and rewelded it all with some proper kit, it was an awkward job welding between the joists but he got it sorted in a morning.
    Cheers Brad:thumbup:
     
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  14. northwest

    northwest Member

    Messages:
    2,055
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    Story of my life that. I always get there (or they get to me) just as they have ran out of money and the <whatever> is an abortion so I end up sorting it out at no real profit to myself hoping that next time they come to me first, they never do though.
     
  15. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    They probably regard you as some kind of social service, really :rolleyes: :laughing:
     
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  16. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    2,503
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    Im so glad to hear that ,,,,



    I thought it was only me thats both daft and soft . Nice to know im not on my own , Im sure a few of us here are often in the same situation.
     
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  17. mtt.tr

    mtt.tr Member

    Messages:
    4,041
    Essex England

    I thought that me when reading it.
     
  18. bricol Member

    Messages:
    1,518
    N.Yorks, UK
    Hiding the support inside the beam - and using the hollo bolts as no access inside once fitted. But unless he's got notes about the welds elsewhere, he's relying on the fabricator to tidy things up so the beam slides nicely over it.

    To me, I'd be thinking hes put the posts up, then realised he should have slotted the beam onto them first - so cut the beam, drop it over and weld the cutouts back on to tidy it up - so the welding in the picce is cosmetic only - although you could argue he's weakened the beam by cutting the bottom out, and added some nice stress raisers at the ends of the cut - but I can't imagine it'll really affect it in holding a house up - unless you've got some large people doing star jumsp all day every day.
     
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  19. spirals413 New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    UK- West Midlands
    Spoke to the SE and a fully welded connection should be fine and they will recalculate. Could have still used the hollo bolts but I don't trust the welded connections from the shop now and would rather just get it all done properly.
    Then spoke to the builder yesterday and when he started comparing welding with silicone caulking :doh: and insisted that the weld is good (ignorance is bliss), I said I can't have this conversation, im not arguing about it and I'm getting a welder in, end of story. He's pushed back a little bit, got grumpy but he's ok with it now and we will sort out the cost. So he's being reasonable enough about it.

    Got a couple of welders coming round today to have a look at it. Half the guys I called said they wouldn't touch the job, but the other half have said its not a problem.

    Sick of cowboys, the last builder I had, messed up a big loft conversion and re-roof. He left the job with half a roof on. Ended up doing the whole thing myself, including re-framing more than half the roof, fixing his multiple and plentiful f*** ups. That's where I learnt how to burn lead, as I did all the leadwork myself. Anyway that's why I am watching this guy like a hawk. He probably doesn't like it but oh well!


    Reading some of your comments, I'm cracking up!

    @bricol just seen your comment- you are right on the money, the structure is weakened on the longitudinal axis by removing the bottom as it affects torsion as well as the moment forces and it will be laterally loaded in compression and tension. It needs to be welded back on properly. It is structural.

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  20. bricol Member

    Messages:
    1,518
    N.Yorks, UK
    Even better - the drawing called for 160x80x10 with 8mm flat welded top and bottom - and you look to have two bits of 80x80x?
     
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