thicker plate to 4mm box vertical

  1. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    wondering what the proper way to do this would be...more than one run? needs to be vertical.


    I tried a test piece V-ing the flat bar and one going downwards either side then the top + bottom ...withstood the big hammer test so not bad (can see the weld breaking away a bit on the bracket)but how would you do it?

    it's a bracket for compression springs...

    IMG_20171122_175516.jpg
     
  2. Personally I wouldn't V the plate, make sure you've got a good tight fit up then vertical up using "Christmas tree" weave or a stringer root vertical up then a nice tight weave over the top
     
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  3. nickk Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,875
    Location:
    Hay-on-wye
    I only use downhill as a temporary weld on something non critical,otherwise I'll use it as a root run ,they've got limited strength.
     
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  4. dab4318 Member

    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    Hay-On-Wye
    I was always taught in college anything over 3mm should be vertical up.
     
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  5. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    Thanks...will give it a try going up the way today. I’ve tried before but seem to get it biting better going down the way...as long as let it bubble enough at the top....need practice I guess
     
  6. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    Tried going up...Not pretty but seems solid....

    To.tidy it up would it be best to try burn right back in to that weld with another weld over the top? Or just try make it look better going down?
    View attachment 124488
     
  7. Arclikeharrypotter Member

    Messages:
    1,034
    Location:
    Northampton
    Can't see your picture, but as long as you've fused into the root you can always grind your high spots, I'm assuming it's crowned, and then run a weave over the top.
     
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  8. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    Yupp...went very convex/bulging out!

    Maybe my imagination but seemed far hotter going up the way :)

    Finished thing isn't exactly pretty either but was a right mess before grinding and going back.over it.

    Cheers all


    IMG_20171123_105723.jpg
     
    • IMG_20171123_131632.jpg
  9. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    10,002
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK

    Heat rises! Hence v - up gets warmer towards the end of your run. With respect it don't look too great if that's a safety critical part
     
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  10. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    No probs...I posted to get opinions.....please tell me your thoughts...


    I've always welded these brackets vertical down before...still fine after years of use but this ramp is a bit bigger so thought I'd get some thoughts..
     
  11. Vertical down can look prettier until you get the hang of it but on that type of joint the fusion will be non existent
     
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  12. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    2nd pic is a down run on top of an initial upwards d run BTW

    I'll def be doing them up from now....but going down after an up to tidy it should be ok?
     
  13. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    10,002
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    Uneven top is an uneven bottom . I think we have all washed over a less than tidy v up weld in the past (those who haven't must only get nice stuff in places you can get to and or have all the time in the world ) . however what you wash over won't get any better fusion than it started off with .
    If its 4mm thick to 8 mm and you mig it v down correctly as a single and only pass I do believe it will be OK if done right . rather run a cel down it though personally
     
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  14. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    Thanks Kent...what's a cell tho? Last line of post.

    This is kinda what it looked like before going back over it with a down...except there was a blob of moulten metal needed ground off too.

    I'll never be the tidiest at welding...prob average about 20 mins welding a week over the year but its good to learn.. IMG_20171123_183938.jpg
     
  15. nickk Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,875
    Location:
    Hay-on-wye
    I would say your not weaving at all side to side, your only travelling upwards, you should travel upward a mil then back down that same mil, then side to side[pausing a second at the edge] 4x,then up a mil & so on, then you won't have that ridge down the centre, that weld is weak at the edges ,which is where a fracture can start.just look at the difference to the v.down ,very concave a tiny fillet.
    practice as long as it takes, then it'll be 2nd nature.
     
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  16. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    cheers nickk....tried weaving doing the 'christmas tree' thing but it didn't go too well...so tried a stringer (had to google that this morning! but that means minimal weaving?)...I take it a root run is like it sounds...burnig right in to both pieces of metal?
     
  17. image.jpeg
    The secret is to pause for a count of 2 to 3 seconds at each of the three points of the triangle and travel between each point as quick as you can without breaking the arc. Set your power so you ger a good, tight, dip transfer arc, probably around the same as you would use for welding 2mm to 3mm thick material in the flat
     
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  18. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    thanks backpurge..I was barely stopping in the middle when trying that earlier, also prob had the power too high as would've started blowing through the 4mm box if I'd stayed on it for 2 seconds every time without moving
     
  19. nickk Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,875
    Location:
    Hay-on-wye
    the root run is the first in a series of fillets[runs]
    ALL fillets must burn into both pieces of metal!:D
     
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  20. smashweld Member

    Messages:
    555
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    I like the idea of a 'functional' root run then another to tidy it up!

    tried the xmas tree technique today at different speeds...thoughts/suggestions?

    cheers

    IMG_20171124_183545.jpg
     
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