The Denbigh Drill

  1. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    A shot showing the dark blue in the recessed parts, and behind the spindle guard. There will be a chain running between these holes, and upon cleaning it I’ve discovered it’s a very nice copper riveted type.
     
    • E3F5D7A8-B09B-4685-B557-9266C22D6E14.jpeg
  2. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    More dark blue. I’m pretty pleased with how this looks now!
     
    • E4FA2024-2E1F-41B8-9E6A-6C69286AFA5C.jpeg
    spencer 427 and fizzy like this.
  3. Cuthy246

    Cuthy246 Member

    Messages:
    358
    Location:
    Scotland, Highlands
    When renovating our house we replaced all the doors, bought pre primed ones and after fitting each to its respective frame (and labelling for later identification) painted them in the garage. Two big screws in the top of the door and hung from the rafters, painted mine with brush but could easily hang a line of them up and spray them instead. Saves the hassle of getting paint on other things (like new carpet....)
     
    Dieselkid 63 and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
  4. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Member

    Messages:
    11,639
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    I normally stick 2 screws each end and suspend from trestles. Prefer painting them on the flat.
    Can turn em over with the screws then while still tacky
     
  5. Cuthy246

    Cuthy246 Member

    Messages:
    358
    Location:
    Scotland, Highlands
    A much better idea than the way I did mine, was always having to hold the bottom to stop them swinging while brushing. One to remember for next time :thumbup:
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  6. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Member

    Messages:
    11,639
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Once they are touch dry can hang em from the rafters with the same screws for a few days. :)
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  7. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    I have been wondering how the spindle assembly works the past few days so I decided to have a go at reassembly for fun. As it happens, it’s very simple.

    The problems I encountered dismantling it were caused by seized parts and heavy grease/rust deposits. With these gone, it slots together nicely. Firstly the collar with the rack on must be inserted to align with the teeth on the horizontal shaft. This can be locked in place with a hex screw on the cast outer. Then the spindle is inserted underneath, and the two lock rings are wound in to sandwich the collar between them and the thrust bearing below. Hook the chain up and you’re done.

    It’s necessary to build this part of the mechanism before the upper shaft goes in due to the skew gears above the spindle. If you do it too shaft first, you won’t be able to fit the large gear in and you’ll have to start again.
     
    • B3D234F3-B3FE-41FB-ACE4-036ECBB9AE34.jpeg
  8. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Some work on my drill.

    I’m onto the engineering unit of my course and we’re doing welding at the moment - great fun and very rewarding to get right. We’ve done oxy acetylene welding and mig so far. I’m going to take advantage of this and weld up a nice little box to go on the column of the drill to hold the switch.

    The holes drilled in the column are not centred, the top one is 4mm off. Similarly the cast iron switch has randomly placed holes.

    More to come...
     
    • AC40860F-4975-423B-A1D1-21DF4970032A.jpeg
    • A78822ED-BD2C-4035-928D-29A63E553F72.jpeg
  9. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    ^^ I thought you'd donned black gloves for the second pic there.....:scared:. :)
     
    Dieselkid 63 likes this.
  10. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    I got told off for coming inside with soot on my face! Swarfega works miracles as usual...
     
    slim_boy_fat and Seadog like this.
  11. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    The project is beginning to take shape. I welded the bracket together today since we’re doing the engineering module of the course.

    I like to take full advantage of any opportunities presented and I had both a lathe and mig welder at my disposal today, so I also turned down the rise/fall shaft and turned a new collar for it. Out of 11 students I’m the only one who knows how to operate the lathe, some don’t even know what it does... the course is automotive engineering... big respect to my tutor who just lets me get on with it though. I’ve been turning small jobs for people in my class working on their own projects (we have five or so things to make and I can add ‘flair’ by means of knurling or machined finishing if you’re nice to me :D )

    Ive got to grind out the last of my welds and radius the edges, then it’s time to put the bracket into paint. The collar needs finishing by drilling and tapping for a grub screw. Only the broken backgear handle up top needs doing now - I’ll probably have to get this fixed by a friend. Not a bad weeks work though.
     
    • 182AA01A-123F-4CC3-B02A-900579764E10.jpeg
    • 8156CC93-87E3-47C1-AEBC-179F00438146.jpeg
    • 0672A6ED-ACE8-448D-A2B9-909DF3AC00BD.jpeg
  12. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,434
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    so become the teacher then, some of us are lucky enough to be shown what they do and are shown how dangerous they can be so these machines need respect when in use

    also show them what happens if they are not respectful with lathes like that video grabbing someone to show the truth about no respect
     
  13. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    I have mate, just the basics like, turning it on, what the feeds do, how to face things off, centre drilling. Those who are interested see the merits of it.

    It’s great fun. Always make a habit of turning the machine off when cleaning. So easily to accidentally hit the power when leaving over the ways.

    Not sure about others but if I’m having a conversation I whack the machine off. Then fire up for a demo run. And safety glasses for everyone :)
     
  14. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Painted and fitted. Now I’m going to apply a bead of filler between the column and the bracket, sand it flush and it should look as though it was always there once done!
     
    • D3F1570D-166D-471B-8FD4-BF127453E677.jpeg
    • EBE0AED6-FA2D-42FE-83F6-28946624596F.jpeg
  15. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,699
    Location:
    Moray
    Very nice job, just like on your lathe. Machines like this are part of our shared industrial heritage. They deserve to be looked after and used.

    That way, many years hence, future generations will be able to see just what our species was once capable of.

    Have you read "The Second Sleep" by Robert Harris? It's the way things are going...
     
  16. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    Lovely job on the bracket :thumbup:
     
    Dieselkid 63 likes this.
  17. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Hit something of a snag...

    I lowered the drill tonight to 180deg to slide in the chain and attached counterweight. I’ve been waiting for the paint to harden so I could strop the frame and not damage the finish. It all went in no hassle, but on checking it I’m missing about 4” of chain travel. I had to lose a link to get it free, but that’s only half an inch at best, so I’m wondering where all the other chain has gone?

    I want the maximum use of the drill, after all it has a power feed, so I’m thinking I might splice a bit of old bike chain between the old chain and the counterweight. You won’t be able to see it as it will be in the column and you need the old chain for the pulley up top to work properly. An annoying little development!
     
    • ED909B74-809D-4E3C-BA57-3AC478480106.jpeg
  18. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Project update:

    No more chain needed.

    An interesting little exploration session in the workshop this afternoon. I tilted and laid the drill flat again to see if I could rectify the problem. A short chain could have meant the chain had looped and snagged on itself, though this was not the case. Weight and chain out, I could look down the bore. I dangled wire and the bike chain down, and both got tangled and stuck.

    This was confusing as it was to my knowledge a clean bore. It is not - there is an offset roller in there, and then it became obvious - the chain must previously have gone on the wrong side and the pressure pushed it out of alignment, thus losing length. Stiffer wire was used and I routed the chain the right way, sucking the counterweight back in and finally attached it all up to the rack.

    I have to say I love the feel of a counterweight over a spring. The frame needs another coat of paint and then it will be time to start adding some more mechanical bits.

    The bracket has had a skim of filler around the join, looks the part even in primer.
     
    • 4A21301D-A419-4802-B7F2-BC90506A2DE6.jpeg
    • 6992ED35-78AC-4E11-B50A-BE25DC3F76A2.jpeg
    • C7BA29C8-582B-479F-ABA3-239BC71031C0.jpeg
  19. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    I did some garage tidying and discovered something I’d forgotten I’d bought - a big lamp from a lathe. I thought it would be a good addition to the drill.

    I didn’t want to modify the Auto Memota starter as it’s a really nice switch with grooves on the top. Fortunately I have another MEM switch - the one that came with the drill. This switch is quite damaged and someone decided to paint it yellow and then red at some stage in its life. Importantly though, this switch has a plain top and could mount the lamp much better :)

    The switch front has cleaned up ok. It’s knocked about and has a few nicks. I will paint it black eventually.
     
    • 1219032E-EA07-4418-85F3-46C3DF909969.jpeg
    • 1AAAB6F5-CF68-4EE7-8D17-909E0C91EA95.jpeg
    • 21A2C50D-BC6A-4363-ABB2-6196FE72B656.jpeg
  20. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,574
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Furthering my post in the ‘today I acquired’ thread, I’ve rebuilt the auto feed clutch. A nice and simple sliding dog clutch which is activated by a lever on the other side, which pops into place by a sprung steel ball. I had to paint the gearbox and I need to give it a topcoat too. This will be done on the machine as loose boxes seem to get a few nicks being fettled into position.

    The drill frame is on its side again. Again. Yes, chief idiot over here forgot that prior to connecting the counterweight chain to the rack, the automatic depth stop must first be installed around the quill sleeve. Nice one.

    Once I’ve got it upright I’m going to start painting and adding a few more bits to the machine. Watch this space...
     
    • 6872F619-7BFF-4E2D-9204-07754714B5D9.jpeg
    • F8467F77-0A66-496B-B358-C6F3E073A6E2.jpeg
Advertisements