I have just purchased a Boxford Lathe

  1. RichardM Member

    Originally they didn't have a relief valve and I don't think you'll need one with the pump you have.
     
  2. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    9,473
    Location:
    Kent
    Thanks guys I shall fit a simple tap then and see what happens first. I do have 3 if those flexi spouts with taps on the base
    But I can't find them
     
  3. Laurie Tedcastle Member

    Messages:
    37
    Location:
    NW Northants (UK)
    @123hotchef
    pair of quick & dirty guards I fitted to my lathe to avoid coolant splashing. Left fixed to the headstock, right to the apron.
    When working closer to the headstock, the RH one slides inside the LH:
    blob.jpg

    The guards are easily removed when not needed. Bracket on the apron:
    blob.jpg

    Reverse side of the apron guard:
    blob.jpg


    Also have a and adjustable extension of the chuck guard:
    blob.jpg


    Laurie
     
    123hotchef, slim_boy_fat and Hood like this.
  4. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    5,992
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    Bit of thought has gone into that!
     
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  5. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    9,473
    Location:
    Kent
    Thanks @Laurie Tedcastle I like that idea especially the sliding extension too. So the guard has a piece on the rear that slots into the box section attached to the apron does it.
     
  6. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    9,473
    Location:
    Kent
    Sorry just saw the next pic looks like a piece of Ali rivited on. I might have to borrow that idea if I keep getting coolant running over the handle and onto the floor
     
  7. Laurie Tedcastle Member

    Messages:
    37
    Location:
    NW Northants (UK)
    They are domed head hex drive screws (not rivets) fixing the steel sheet to the peg which slots into the socket. Same for the headstock one, just didn't bother to photo it. The guards mostly stay in place, but are lifted off when tapping, changing chucks, etc.

    Design was the quickest/easiest I could come up with at the time. Would really have liked a big sliding guard like we had on the Herbert turret lathes, but it would have been mega amount of work. If your not familiar with the Herbert lathes have a look at the sliding guard on Hood's Computurn thread.

    I also had to extend the rear splash guard vertically to prevent cutting oil getting sprayed over the back of the lathe.

    Laurie
     
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  8. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    9,473
    Location:
    Kent
    How did u fit the box section that the guard slides into on to the apron
     
  9. Laurie Tedcastle Member

    Messages:
    37
    Location:
    NW Northants (UK)
    @123hotchef

    Look at the 2nd pic I posted. The square tube is plug welded (I think - it's been a long time now) to a piece of 3mm plate, which in turn slides between the telescopic leadscrew guard end plate and the apron using the original telescopic guard mounting screws. You may have drill & tap some holes in the apron wall if your lathe doesn't have a suitable mounting point. I did have to drill & tap for the headstock guard mounting. Each lathe is different, of course, so you just have to exercise the old grey cells to sort something that works for you. Some are reluctant to modify their equipment. If I think
    of an improvement, I'll do it.

    Laurie
     
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  10. Laurie Tedcastle Member

    Messages:
    37
    Location:
    NW Northants (UK)
    Pic from the rear of the extended splashback:
    blob.jpg

    and from the front, the extra space gets used for toolholder storage:
    blob.jpg

    Laurie
     
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  11. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    9,473
    Location:
    Kent
    Found them all 3 in a box in a safe place.

    I had orders another already doh
     
    • 20191110_145353.jpg
    Hood likes this.
  12. minimutly Member

    Messages:
    1,115
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire Wales
    That's a whole lot of tools!
     
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