I have just purchased a Boxford Lathe

  1. 123hotchef Member

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    Kent
    Yes I could indeed. That would regulate the flow but not stop the coolant running off the lathe onto the floor.
     
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  2. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Less volume, reduced throw? :dontknow:
     
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  3. 123hotchef Member

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    8,426
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    It is possible maybe less will go on the floor due to reduced flow
     
  4. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

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    If you extend your guard too far our over the hand wheel as you suggest, all the coolant will rund out of it down on to the floor, or your leg.
     
  5. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    Strip of clear plastic curtain. Like you get in warehouses on the bottom of the guard as a mud flap type tbingm
     
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  6. 123hotchef Member

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    8,426
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    That is what happens now mate
     
  7. 123hotchef Member

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    I reakon so just rivit it on job done
     
  8. zx9

    zx9 Member

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    "Better get a bucket" :)
    In the dim and distant past we had three lathes at school, a Boxford was the smallest, some of the kids were able to make one heck of a mess with the cutting oil others were able to regulate the flow and aim such that it was just sufficient to lubricate and cool the tool.
    As @slim_boy_fat recommended a tap to reduce the flow will help.
    As you are using carbide tips (IIRC) and it is not a production process munching large cuts so you probably don't exactly need flood cooling like in the CNC videos @Hood posts.
     
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  9. Pete.

    Pete. Member

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    If you fit a tap don't fit it near the nozzle, fit it at the incoming end. Better yet fit a tap and a relief valve (easy peasy to make as a lathe project) so that you don't push the pump pressure up by regulating the flow.
     
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  10. 123hotchef Member

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    How does one make a relief valve I take it there is a return that rather than restrict flow it dirvirts it back to the tank
     
  11. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

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    As its a centrifugal pump, they can and should actually start against a close valve or check valve.

    Rather an a relief valve, you could just install a 3 way valve back to the tank.

    A relief vavle is just a simple plug that sides open but held closed with a spring, usually adjustable.
     
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  12. 123hotchef Member

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    8,426
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    That's what I was thinking mate a 3 way valve with the 3rd way back to tank
     
  13. 123hotchef Member

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    It might be better to shorten the guard actually
     
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  14. Pete.

    Pete. Member

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    For a relief valve just drill a small hole at the bottom of a big hole, drop in a ball bearing and spring, screw on a cap that has a hole drilled in it. I made one for my hobber I'll get some photos tomorrow.
     
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  15. Hood

    Hood Forum Supporter

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    Would a relief valve be needed?
    My CNC Lathe and Chiron both have constant running pumps and solenoid valves to switch on the flow and dont have relief valves. I could see the need with a gear pump or similar.
     
  16. 123hotchef Member

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    8,426
    Location:
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    I don't know. But restricting the flow with a tap can't be good for the pump
     
  17. Hood

    Hood Forum Supporter

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    Don't see it being a problem, if there is no outlet for the fluid then the pump just won't be pumping it anywhere. It is just a vane impeller that is rotating in free space so there will not be any significant load on the motor whether it is pumping fluid or not.
    As said both my Computurn and Chiron had constant running pumps with solenoid valves to switch the coolant on/off so if there would be an issue with doing that I don't think the manufacturers would have done it.
     
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  18. Hood

    Hood Forum Supporter

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    Oh and both machines are over 30 years old and both have the original pumps.
     
  19. 123hotchef Member

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    Location:
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    Good point So there will.be no pressure build up anyway
     
  20. Pete.

    Pete. Member

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    8,593
    Location:
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    Probably not necessary then. My hobber has one because it has a gear pump. Years ago I had a machine with coolant That had a feed pipe with a tap just behind the nozzle. Turning the tap down to reduce the flow just meant less coolant came out but at much greater speed. That one certainly could have used a prv.
     
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