How would you repair this railing?

  1. Aesgarth Member

    Messages:
    510
    Northumberland
    20200522_154423.jpg
    Apparently someone reversed into it. From the description I was given before looking at it I thought it could probably be straightened but now I'm leaning towards cutting out and replacing the bottom half of the large (30mm) bar and the whole of the smaller (20mm) bar...
     
  2. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    457
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    bit of heat .. a sledge hammer , and a block of wood .
     
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  3. Gareth0123

    Gareth0123 You'll need 16 pigs to do the job in one sitting!

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  4. waddycall

    waddycall Member

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    1,102
    United Kingdom
    Does it need to be done in situ?
     
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  5. 8ob

    8ob Forum Supporter

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    moscow on thames
    As Tom says or tease it back with a ratchet strap, perhaps remove the infill one thats broken its weld and knock that around on bench.

    What is it with cars and railings? Lost count of the number of times ours have been mown down :vsad:

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  6. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Saw the bent bits out, straighten in your workshop, weld back in.
     
  7. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    457
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    why ,, ten mins with the gas axe ,, block of wood on the bent bits , and two hits with the sledge , i wouldnt dream of replacing anything or taking it down , hardest part of the job is painting it again ,
    unless Im not seeing something you guys are. Ah ok , bottom welds broken ,, take a suitcase set with you ,,
     
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  8. gordon stephenson

    gordon stephenson Forum Supporter

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    I think that I would go for the cold approach, ratchet strap etc, even you have to attach the other end to your tow bar etc,
     
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  9. Pete.

    Pete. Member

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    9,024
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I'd wedge three gaps with timber to share the load and pull it back straight against them with a strap.
     
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  10. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    7,389
    Location:
    Essex
    I’d heat it, park the van close, use a come along and a sledge.
     
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  11. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,067
    Somerset
    Bit of dunnage and a big hammer... if it's fixed well...theres a broken weld, so you will have to get a welder out, so may as well just cut it out and put a new bit in or just cut it out, straighten and weld back in.
     
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  12. brightspark

    brightspark Member

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    28,884
    Location:
    yarm
    a block of wood and a big hammer weld it back on 1st though
     
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  13. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    You'll end up with a weird shaped repair then, it won't simply pull straight, there will be a kink. Heat in the crux of the bend is necessary to repair it in place leaving no evidence.
     
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  14. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    457
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    heat lets you pick where it bends , as opposed to bending where it likes.

    take a bit of tin to work as a draught excluder for when your heating it too , other wise the breeze wont help , if your doing it this weekend ,,
     
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  15. gordon stephenson

    gordon stephenson Forum Supporter

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    6,652
    Location:
    Skelton in Cleveland U.K.
    I should have explained a little more, Also using wooden packing to support on adjacent uprights, using the opposite and equal force to achieve a good result,Worth a try before chopping out and replacing.
     
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  16. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    I'm guessing that is 3/4" or 1' solid square bar. You could pound on that all day with a sledge, and all you'll do is shake the rest of the fence to bits before that bit bends back where it came from. Believe me, been there, done that.
     
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  17. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,067
    Somerset
    Staightened far worse than that with that method many times... Had worse back from the galvanisers :laughing:
    Chunky block on the bend, sharp hit, then fine tune with a smaller hammer using the sledge as a head to choose where its going to bend...any slight undulations that are left, just flatten off with a fibre disc. Only a bit of inch bar.

    Only if its fixed solid though, which it appears not to be.
    A little heat would make it easier for sure...one of them jobs.... takes longer to setup gas or welder than it does to actually do it.
     
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  18. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

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    5,952
    UK London
    Car jack or hydraulic jack and a stout rope.
     
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  19. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    “Only if it’s fixed solid though” Errrr...... it’s part of a flexible fence frame.

    Bearing in mind you have limited space behind it for counter effecting weight, and little support from the ends, whacking with a big hammer is just like hitting a spring. If you could hold a very hefty weight right behind it, like 50kg of solid, then you could possibly brute force it somewhere into shape.
     
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  20. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    I once sat in the engine room of a ship, listening to a horrendous hammering from topside, and was eventually asked to go and investigate. A rather hungover AB was attempting to straighten a ships ladder, made from 3/4” square bar rungs and 1/2” by 2” side rails.30 minutes pounding with a sledge produced nothing.

    I showed him how to chain it to the deck, hook a chain around the bend, and slowly haul on it with a 5 ton winch, an inch at a time. Steel is a spring, you can pound on it all day, but unless it is held solid it will laugh at you.
     
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