Diesel cab heater

  1. CompoSimmonite Member

    Messages:
    4,186
    Location:
    Werrington, Stoke-on-Trent
    Are you saying the 2kw is a physically smaller unit ? I had a full enclosure for my mobility scooter which such a heater was an option and wondered how it would fit.
     
  2. CompoSimmonite Member

    Messages:
    4,186
    Location:
    Werrington, Stoke-on-Trent
    In theory would it be possible to run a 12v heater off 24v by using a, say, 5amp 24v to 12v inverter plus a small 12v battery to provide the extra amps during the initial start up ?
     
  3. dcocks

    dcocks Member

    Messages:
    349
    Location:
    Leicestershire
    Just use a voltage dropper many narrowboats use them
    20-amp-24v-12v-voltage-dropper.html
     
  4. wookie Member

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    2,597
    Location:
    .
    Yes, normally they are called "droppers" or "convertors" rather than inverter, most droppers have 2 ratings, one is the continuous load and the other is the short term overload that they can supply. Quite often the overload value is 150% of the continuous rating.

    You can get 24volt diesel heaters, why not fit one of those and make things less complicated.

    What's the efficiency of that dropper ? if they don't list it then I wouldn't touch it with a barge pole.
     
    bigegg likes this.
  5. fizzy Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,571
    uk
    Yes that is correct - will dig the book out tomorrow it has dims for both.
     
    CompoSimmonite likes this.
  6. fizzy Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,571
    uk
    Nice cheap ducting. £30 for 10 metres. Far better and cheaper than the proper stuff.
    3" hard to find. Popular for hydroponics - wonder why they use it???? 20181213_174626.jpg 20181213_174610.jpg 20181213_174603.jpg
     
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  7. fizzy Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,571
    uk
    As promised the sizes. 20181213_182635.jpg
     
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  8. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,425
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire

    because it fits in the cavity between inner and outer house walls.

    for when you need a "stealth" vent for your diesel heater...
    :whistle:

    DAMHIKT
     
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  9. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,360
    Location:
    Moray
    @doubleboost are you having any issues with condensation? Just watched latest night cap and I can see the heater is making it warm in your shop. What happens when you turn it off and the temperature drops?

    I am wondering if you are having any heating/cooling dew point issues, with condensation forming?

    I think for a workshop good insulation and electric heat on constantly to maintain a low background temperature, ramping up when you are in there is the key.
     
  10. doubleboost

    doubleboost Member

    Messages:
    2,623
    Location:
    North Easr England
    No condensation at all very pleased with it the roof is well insulated but the door is not
     
  11. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,360
    Location:
    Moray
    Hello John,

    Glad to know you aren't getting any condensation issues. I used to get it a bit, in my old shop. The one I have now is a part of the house - lined and insulated - so although unheated, it doesn't ever go below 12 degrees C. Just a small oil filled heater is enough to bring the temperature up a few degrees to comfortable levels.

    When I first bought the house it had a standard up and over door. I got a roller one like yours, but it has insulation inside the segments, polystyrene I think.

    I was thinking you could box the heater up outside and feed the warm air in through some ducting and maybe make a baffle to cut the noise down.
     
    doubleboost likes this.
  12. indy4x

    indy4x Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,460
    Location:
    Pontypool, South Wales. UK
    doubleboost and bigegg like this.
  13. wookie Member

    Messages:
    2,597
    Location:
    .
    I wouldn't expect any condensation issues with these heaters especially if the heater is inside your workshop, then all it is doing is taking the air from your workshop, heating it up and blowing it back into your workshop. The beauty of these types of heaters is ALL they add is heat, any moisture created by burning the fuel is sent down the exhaust pipe.

    If your workshop is already damp then running one of these heaters will mean you have a warmer but still damp workshop, the best thing for a damp workshop is a dehumidifier.

    If the heater draws air from outside then potentially it could add moisture to your workshop if it was foggy/damp outside.
     
    garethp likes this.
  14. mrsbruce

    mrsbruce Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,156
    Location:
    Livingston, Scotland
    Is it safe to keep both air intakes inside the workshop. The instructions state that the heater should draw the heat block intake from outside.
     
    DAPPH likes this.
  15. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,360
    Location:
    Moray
    The thing is, all air contains a percentage of moisture. When heated air hits a cold surface (if surface is below the dew point) the moisture will condense.
     
  16. daedalusminos Member

    Messages:
    636
    Location:
    Norwich
    I'd say if the heater is working as designed then there's plenty of airflow through the burner, problems may arise under fault conditions e.g. if the exhaust or inlet become blocked or a fan fault occurs etc. Definitely safer to have the inlet drawing from outside.
     
  17. wookie Member

    Messages:
    2,597
    Location:
    .
    Yes you should draw air from outside, but I'd happily install one in my garage with it sucking in garage air. I'd definitely have a carbon monoxide alarm, and I'd test it regularly.

    Which inlet are you referring to ?

    There are 2 inlets, the large one on the opposite end to the hot ducting outlet is for the air you intend to heat, while the small diameter one underneath is for combustion air. The later is the one that is supposed to draw from outside. Having said that when installing them on boats as per the instructions both the air inlets usually draw from the same place, which is usually somewhere behind the scenes (as it were) so from a locker or the lazarette.
     
  18. daedalusminos Member

    Messages:
    636
    Location:
    Norwich
    I was referring to the combustion chamber inlet.
     
  19. daedalusminos Member

    Messages:
    636
    Location:
    Norwich
    Just finished making a mounting plate for my diesel heater from some left over 1.5mm galvanised sheet. The heater will be mounted on the timber garage wall so I wanted something that would give some heat protection, construction is folded and spot welded.
    IMG_20181223_151733.jpg IMG_20181223_151643.jpg
     
  20. mrsbruce

    mrsbruce Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,156
    Location:
    Livingston, Scotland
    I like that, I’ve been looking for a way to fix my heater in the hut. Would you mind if I stole your idea?:hug:
     
    WorkshopChris likes this.
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