Collage and Jobs

  1. Our workload, had decreased a bit, farmers are just holding onto their money. Doing small jobs themselves. On the day lockdown was announced , boss had 30 phone calls about jobs, on the day after, his phone never rang once! It is pretty much back to normality. It gave is the chance to give the workshop and yard a good sort out. It did not help , that we had started another engineer, only a few weeks before. We are lucky , because we look after the machines for a large pig company, with around a dozen farms. Do most of the work for several carrot and potato growers, also all the plant repairs for local scrapyard.
    We also subcontract , to do some hydraulic jobs, for local Distilleries.

    I always tell young lads to stick in at college, the paper side is important. If you get an apprenticeship with a big dealership, you will learn everything about the brand they sell or if you goto a smaller independent dealership , that does anything, you will get a broader experience of machines and equipment.
    A qualification from one of the big manufacturers, could be handy , if you decide to travel when you are older, would get you in with any dealer overseas. Also if you can operate a tractor and machinery , you will always find work in New Zealand , Australia or Canada.
    Future routes can include working directly for a manufacturer, or as foreman service manager.
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  2. armalites Member

    Messages:
    5,062
    Herefordshire
    I fully understand why someone wouldn't want to work shifts but if you focus on negatives then every job is rubbish. Shifts will imediately bring an uplift in pay and when you clock out you've handed over to somone else and you are done. Sure there will be times where it seems all your mates are in the pub when you are working but there will days when you can do stuff when they are at work.

    As a self employeed agricultural engineer you'd have to very naive to think that any farmer is going to leave a machine in a field at 1900 and wait for you to turn up at 0900 the following morning. During harvest season you'll be working every hour that its light and often beyond

    In a factory maintenance environment you'll have a kit of common spares ready on the shelf and it will be finite, with agricultural stuff it could be as simple as a broken bolt or loose hose right up to pulling an engine.
     
    plewlandsbob likes this.
  3. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    I agree with that completely, theirs positives and negatives too both,y concern isn't about doing shifts at the moment it's more that I dont want to do shifts for the rest of my life, can you do plant maintenance whilst still being paid well, and not do shifts?
     
  4. armalites Member

    Messages:
    5,062
    Herefordshire
    Some people's physiology can't deal with shifts, I do standby/overtime and an evening shift but at one of my customers there are guys who have been doing shifts for 30+ years and they like it. One of the guys there renovated a derelict house while working shifts and now lives in a house in a really expensive area.

    If you are someone who can go to bed at 0300 then get up at 0800 and function fine then shifts won't be a problem. It does get harder as you get older, when I was younger if I got called out in the night I sometimes didn't go back to bed as I would be barred for the day so I could do something at home.
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  5. mpats

    mpats Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,158
    Aberdeen
    I've only every worked shifts, once you've done it you may never look back. Plenty guys I work with into their 50's still doing shifts, wouldn't go to a monday to friday. But then we do work equal time so it's pretty good.
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  6. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    6,043
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    Some live to work

    Others work to live.

    You will be at work a long time, finding something you will enjoy, and gain satisfaction from will make the time pass quicker.
     
    James1979 and Jacktegla like this.
  7. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    1,902
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    If you enjoy what you do for a living..
    you will never work a day in your life.
     
    James1979 and Jacktegla like this.
  8. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    Just an update for everyone who gave me some useful advise, I have now veen accepted as an apprentice with mondelez . As a maintenance engineer.
     
    winchman, 8ob, slim_boy_fat and 8 others like this.
  9. daleyd

    daleyd Member

    Messages:
    6,840
    Location:
    Wrexham, North Wales
    In Chirk?
     
  10. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    Yes.
     
    daleyd likes this.
  11. axomoxia Member

    Messages:
    53
    Location:
    uk
    Just don't do what I normally do and refer to your Boys Brigade past as "my time with the paramilitaries".
     
  12. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    well done

    good luck with it
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  13. Robbie260 Member

    Messages:
    1,043
    Location:
    Scotland highland
    Well done good luck.
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  14. Migmac

    Migmac Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,353
    Location:
    Kintyre. Scotland
    Sons an apprentice plant mechcanic, money isn't great at the moment but will improve shortly for him. He helps a pal who is an agri engineer, they have been working from 1900 to 0400 getting tractors and machinery back into the fields and doing their day jobs. It's not shifts but it does have anti social hours at certain times of the year
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  15. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    To be honest the apprenticeship I've managed to get is great money. I almost fell of my chair when I heard it. But I think I've been very lucky as most apprenticeships I applied for were paying 2 thirds of what this one pays.
     
  16. minimutly Member

    Messages:
    1,248
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire Wales
    I'll tell you what I tell the apprentices at work - if no one's teaching you anything don't stand around fiddling with your phone, use it for finding out useful stuff.
    Sadly what I've seen of apprenticeships recently is that they are a shadow of what they used to be, and the craftsmen aren't trained, expected or wanted to give time to training youngsters - so use your time well.
     
  17. dobbslc

    dobbslc Member

    Messages:
    5,388
    Location:
    Hertfordshire UK
    Too true unfortunately.
    I'll spend time showing the younger lads any of the tricks and tips I know but ONLY if they show a willingness to learn something. Some are keen and some are useless :dontknow:
     
    atomant48, stuvy and Jacktegla like this.
  18. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Well done, Jack! :thumbup:
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  19. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,148
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Congrats on getting in, is it electrical or mechanically biased or a multi-skilled apprenticeship?
     
    addjunkie and Jacktegla like this.
  20. dobbslc

    dobbslc Member

    Messages:
    5,388
    Location:
    Hertfordshire UK
    I thought maintenance engineer meant "sitting in the basement boiler room drinking tea and talking bollox all day long" then changing the odd light bulb :laughing:
    Congratulations me old sausage it's not easy getting a decent apprenticeship these days!
    Never forget though that: Tartan paint, a long weight, *sky hooks* and 10 meters of fallopian tube don't exist.
    * you can actually buy sky hooks!* :thumbup:
     
    stuvy, Jacktegla and Keith 66 like this.
Advertisements