Collage and Jobs

  1. rtcosic

    rtcosic Member

    As @addjunkie and @Brad93 have said Instrument/Electrical Technicians are higher paid than Mechanical Technicians - unless highly specialized such as Rotating Equipment or Aeronautical Technicians. The places they work in tend to be cleaner and less arduous. Several of my Instrument/Electrical Technicians read for degrees, none of my Mechanical Technicians did. Two of my Instrument/Electrical Technicians are now working at CERN.

    I am concerned that one of your main drivers seems to be getting a position as close to your current home as possible. As @addjunkie said 'No one chooses a job for life now, so for the first decade or so, what you are really doing is acquiring transferable skills to sell to prospective employers.' I would add that the days of following Dad/Grandad/Uncle into the local job market are long gone - unless Dad is the local Squire of course. In the first decade or so you should open up your geographical horizons as well. Geographical flexibility is a valuable transferable skill.
     
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  2. winchman

    winchman Member

    Messages:
    3,587
    Location:
    Merseyside
    Have you spoken to The / Waterside? Would you be prepared to travel?
    Whilst I agree with rtcosic I won't travel, its just not for everyone my good friend has done it world wide for the last 33 years, but I know of people who just can't do it.
    The main thing is get an apprenticeship, I know of lads travelling a couple of hours on public transport to the training place then they try to get them work nearer to home.
    You should snatch VWMARKS hand off spend a week social distance and see what you can learn, it all shows you are keen to work and learn, get some photos of you whilst at work its all evidence to the interviewer that you are keen.
    So this should be your plan
    Contact Training / recruitment places and VWMARK today, you will get loads of knock backs but you have to be resilient , just keep trying.
    Keep a spread sheet of who you contact, the date, who you spoke to and follow up in a few weeks / months depending on feed back.
    I assume you speak Welsh?
    Sut mae eich Cymraeg
    Look at the Spirax link I sent you as you can talk about it at an interview, lots of places use steam, even if you never use it you will learn something from it.
    Use Covid to your advantage, read about engineering stuff, You tube is good, lots of companies have product tutorials.
    One thing you have listened to is the spelling, not seen any errors! :laughing:
     
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  3. MCKDAVID Member

    some sound advice above, but for me that single line sums it up. Adaptability / diversity is definitely the way forward these days, industry / technology / materials / methods are changing so fast that unfortunately it's very easy to get left behind. if you have a base of skills that can be adapted or added to easily, then you're in a far better position for the longer term. I believe there will be a a resurgance in value of the trades, simply by necessity. It's all well and good working in an office, but who'll fix things, when the lights go off, car breaks down, leaking water etc..

    my advice, working a fair bit with farmers and their kit, you definitely don't want to look at that industry for financial gain.. some are so tight they squeak when they walk.
     
    Farside, Brad93, minimutly and 2 others like this.
  4. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    I was looking at the agricultural as more of a stepping stone into something bigger like plant. Thanks
     
  5. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    I dont mind travelling to a point but dont really want to travel more than an hour. I agree the best thing for either job is an apprenticeship. Unfortunately I dont speak lots of Welsh just a little bit. I only spoke to vwmark about work exprwincs the other day so we will sort something out. I have been doing what you've said already, I have signed up to all the job sites so they email me when any apprenticeships come up, I have also been in touch with businesses that I know have taken apprentices on before, I have also asked the college to email me links if they have anyone in touch about apprenticeships. At the moment I am still waiting to hear back from kellogs and Cadburys, I applied before lockdown and have spoken to them during lockdown but they're not doing anything until they feel it's safe to carry on with interviews.

    At the moment my top aim is to get some work experience in each job role, so I can see what they do day to day,
     
    winchman likes this.
  6. Tinbasherdan

    Tinbasherdan Bodger in chief

    Messages:
    5,266
    Location:
    Bolton, England
    Quarries, plant hire firms, haulage firms, forestry. Get online and find as many of the above in travelling distance and actually visit and ask if you can speak to the manager, ask if they would be interested in taking on, if not, would they give you some work experience for a couple weeks. Shows more initiative than just waiting for a job alert online
     
  7. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    I have visited a few, but most people around here haven't been that happy about having random people just come in. So what I do now is I ring up and ask if they're ok with mr coming down to talk to them.
     
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  8. minimutly Member

    Messages:
    1,248
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire Wales
    Spelling would be a start - collEge - what is it these days with people insisting that "e" should be an "a"?

    As for what cours, or path to take - you only know that - generall engineering would be a good grounding for a start. But ideally it would be good for you to work for someone to get the practical grounding as well. You'd also learn what doesn't work as well as what does. Good luck, you can do it, but it takes hard work and dedication.
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  9. winchman

    winchman Member

    Messages:
    3,587
    Location:
    Merseyside
    It looks like you are making good progress, the welsh is helpful if working locally and will improve the more you use it, its a great skill to have.
    Just keep your chin up and keep looking you will find something, it might be delayed by Covid etc but it will happen in the end as you are keen and look to be doing all the right things.
    I know a few people who live in Wales and work in engineering Norman Spanners springs to mind I wonder how he is?
    If you are keen 90% of people would help you.
    Keep us posted and any questions just ask.
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  10. jimbo84 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,225
    Location:
    Up North
    :scared: :D :laughing:
     
  11. minimutly Member

    Messages:
    1,248
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire Wales
    My spellin is good, but my typin is carp....
     
  12. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,029
    Location:
    Essex
    have you got LinkedIn?
     
    James1979 likes this.
  13. winchman

    winchman Member

    Messages:
    3,587
    Location:
    Merseyside
    Good point make it look professional state you are looking for an apprenticeship
     
    Brad93 likes this.
  14. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    9,029
    Location:
    Essex
    Add me as a friend, and go through some of my contacts on there, bet you’ll get a few people that need a hand and allow you to get some work experience.
     
  15. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    No, indeed and totaljobs but I will do linked in later, just doing some work now. Good idea.
     
  16. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    6,043
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    While this is true, its far easier to recruit instrument and electrical folk, than a really good rotating equipment guy, as the real deal are few and far between.

    I did have one good mechy who got a degree, lasted 6 weeks in an office and went back on the tools. Last I heard he was out in the Sunny sandy places commissioning new stuff. But as said there are mechanical techs and mechanical techs, some who only swing blinds etc, others who can strip and over haul a dry gas seal. Then ahain good HV guys are hard to find too!
     
    Robbie260 likes this.
  17. Robbie260 Member

    Messages:
    1,043
    Location:
    Scotland highland
    Id second that, what can be classed as good rotating equipment techs are very very hard to find, same with high voltage.

    Id agree with you both on the point of having a degree, from a mechanical trades persons point it seems rather pointless unless you want to get stuck in an office. Id like to have one some days and have thought about doing mine but apart from to say i have a degree i dont see the benifit it will bring me. Oddly enough id probably do an electrical engineering degree now over a mechanical engineering one as i now dont think a degree would teach me anything about mechanics i dont already know. Also electrical engineering just keeps getting more combined with mechanical and is completely replacing all together in most cases if peoples visions for the future are to be belived.
     
  18. I am an Agricultural Engineer. I have been doing it ,for 30 odd years, apart from 8 years working for a Marine Engineering Firm, that had Cummins and Volvo Penta agencies.
    Ag Engineering, can be physically hard work,in all weathers. Lying under a tractor, or machine in the mud or snow, oil dripping down on you, is not much fun. Or crawled inside a Combine Harvester, full of dust on a hot day. Most farmers are grumpy when a machine breaks down. If a potato harvester or forage harvester breaks down, for example, you may have 8 or 9 tractors and trailers, forklifts and drivers all standing around , waiting for you to get the breakdown fixed. Sometimes this can be a proper fix, or just a bodge / Temporary fix , if you cannot get spares, to get them going again. Although am sure the same goes for a Factory, if the production line goes down. Everything always comes down to time and money.

    On the other hand Ag Engineering, covers a range of skills and give job variety, mechanical repairs to engines , transmissions for example, Hydraulics, pnuematics for braking systems, electrical /electronic systems, GPS auto steer, welding and fabrication, basic penetrating / paintspraying, tyre fitting.I

    My time is about 50 / 50 in the workshop or out in the van. I would much rather be taking an engine or a gearbox out for repair than chasing electrical faults, but unfortunately , that accounts for a lot of time nowadays.
    These skills are all transferable. I read an article in a truck magazine a few years ago, about a Swedish lorry manufacturer, that likes ex Agricultural Engineers as test drivers, because they can usually get something going again, somehow, with little resources available.

    Any questions, feel free to ask
     
  19. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    1,902
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    join the army ,,, fair wage , good apprenticeship food and accommodation taken care of , and a set of qualifications that will last you a life time .
    Fair swap for say six years , and by then you will have lots of options, and not be limited to fifteen mins down the road either . There are two other services too one plays with boats and the other has a few air craft , lots of choices.
     
    Jacktegla likes this.
  20. Jacktegla

    Jacktegla Member

    Messages:
    405
    Location:
    Denbighshire
    Thanks for that info, very helpful I was speaking to my neighbour about it he's a farmer and auctioneer so knows quite a few people who do agricultural engineering. He said in his opinion it was alright being in a field in your 20s and 30s but when you get to your 40s you want to switch a field for a nice workshop. I think what he was trying to say is that you need to push yourself to get into a better position. Which I think set of relates to what your saying.

    Also do you think during covid your work load has increased, decreased or stayed the same. Just wondering how it's been effectied by it. Thanks
     
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