Colchester Bantam Mk1 1600

  1. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    oilyneil likes this.
  2. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Time for some bad news.

    Took the cross slide home with the compound slide weirdly jammed on and the compound slide not moving. Hmm. Took it apart and it was a right pain to get apart. Previous signs of a break on the round bit that holds the compound slide to the cross slide, brazed badly and machined off. Not pleased about that and it doesn't look strong at all. Secondly, the bronze nut that the compound slide goes through has been wedged in and is now off-centre. Here's a long to a guy selling a new one. Ouch.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Colcheste...ide-Screw-Nut-Metric-P-N-35701-0/122042413919

    No idea what it would cost to machine this (my screw is fine) but I'm annoyed. The compound slide does work now if I put it all back together, it's just tight as hell and the round bit with the dial markings on doesn't look like it will hold if it keeps getting tapped on and off. I suspect the damage may have been sustained in a chuck crash. It was impossible to see the brazing from the years of dried oil and sawdust, so it must have happened ages ago.

    Aside from this, everything else is going well. The cross slide has cleaned up really nicely and the tool post is looking good too. I will take some pictures this afternoon.

    Cheers for following
     
  3. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Spurred on by the absolutely ridiculous second hand price and the prospect of getting one machined, I went back to the workshop. There's the engineer's option which is try and fix it yourself, or the insurer's option of call it a write off and replace it. Hammer and file in hand, I settled for the first option. (Yes, I am in my socks, I went back out to take piccies)

    [​IMG]

    Using a lot of care, a drill bit shank the same diameter and a file to regain the profile, this is now fixed - it's a little stiff but stiffness wins when it's against $300 for an acme nut. Maybe I can try and machine a new one once I have the machine restored!

    I greased the nuts under the dial thing between the cross slide and compound slide, and it's now turning again! Very happy with that, it was fully seized up when I started on it this morning.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Photographic proof! I'm using ply sheets I've got to lay out the bits while I try and sort transport options. Someone has (poorly) welded the toolpost handle to the toolpost. Spent the other night grinding it down, I might yet grind it off handle and all, re-drill the hole, tap it and cut a new handle from steel rod, see if I can salvage a pool ball from somewhere for the end.

    Also tips for moving the lathe are now needed - we're going to do it in two bits, the machine itself, and then the cabinet another day. I will need any tips you have from how to lift it to how to position/secure it. I can't get a trailer but my mate has a Hi-Ace van which he can put it inside we hope.
     
    daleyd likes this.
  4. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    5,059
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    Moving lathes is fairly easy. Make sure you have some scafff tube or similar cut in to short lengths. Lift the end of the machine, I use a car engine hoist. Put tubes under ends. With a bit of musvle and a crow bar its quite suprising how easily a heavy machine moves.

    I also have two small trolleys each with 4 heavy duty castors. Lift end of machine, put trolley under. And hold in place with ratchet strap. Do the same at the other end...off you go assuming the surface isnt to rough.

    If its gravel as my place is, from one shed to another i used a telehandler. Have also used a tractor with loader too. A hiab is the best, the other day I saw a logging waggon squeezed down the side of a house, using the timber grab hiab to lift steel girders up to the roof, for an extension.
     
  5. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Its in a machine workshop currently, parquet floor with an rsd to back up to. Same setup at mine except I have concrete surrounds and inside too. Thanks for the advice, very helpful!
     
  6. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    I moved my bantam on my own by using castors.
    I had 2 pieces of 6x2" timber, laid flat, and bolted a 100mm diameter castor on each end. I lifted the lathe up using a crowbar and blocks of wood until it was about 8 " high and bolted the wood to the lathe.
    Just winched it up into the trailer and rolled off the other end. Pushed it to where it was going and removed the wood/castors.
     
    Dieselkid 63 likes this.
  7. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    More pics. First up, the break that had been fixed. I think they must have taken it apart, put the nut in backwards thus wedging it in, then been unable to remove the round piece and used excess force to free it. I was less brutal - I wedged wooden dowels under the nut, then gently tapped on the round piece with a wooden mallet until it freed. Yet more evidence that the university doesn't have a clue when it comes to maintenance. It's taken me a whole day to clean this up, it's been a right pain tbh compared to the tailstock which was a simple two hour job.

    [​IMG]

    Under the cross slide - clean, free from grease (which needless to say should never be on open parts) and awaiting oil

    [​IMG]

    And on top. All the holes were cleaned of sawdust and oil. Rust was scraped off, then kero and scrubbing pads were used.

    [​IMG]

    All back together - thank God.

    [​IMG]

    Finally, for others living in NZ I have bought three sets of these shelves now, they are only $20 with a capacity of 50kg per shelf. Although a little flimsy stand-alone, I screwed mine to the wall and they're firm as. Available from The Warehouse in the automotive section, they're called 'Samson'. Thought they'd be great for my lathe stuff as the drawer on the Bantam is a bit small.

    [​IMG]

    Cheers
     
    Turbo, slim_boy_fat and gav0994 like this.
  8. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,144
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    One thing to watch out for when moving lathes is that they are very top heavy!
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  9. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    I had the castors as mentioned in my post above about 6" wider than the lathe, was absolutely fine.
     
  10. Morris Member

    Messages:
    121
    Location:
    Northamptonshire.
    For the lead screw it may be worth having a look at acetal nuts. They are easy to make and have almost zero backlash if done correctly. There are plenty of articles on t'web e.g. http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Anti-Backlash-Nuts-Super-Cheap-and-Simple/
    My mill had an X axis lead screw so worn that in the middle it could skip a pitch (as purchased for restoration). I bought a new length of lead screw from Marchant Dice in 16mm (old was 20) and made new. It is now a joy to use.
     
    barking mat and daleyd like this.
  11. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    We should avoid this by removing the machine from the cabinet
     
  12. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,173
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    My lathe had the casters fixed through the four mounting feet and I had no problems moving it about safely.
     
  13. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    When I got my drill delivered I could barely move the crate so I bolted wheels to it and a handle and wheeled it into the workshop. I will price up building a skate for it.
     
  14. Barlidge

    Barlidge Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    834
    Location:
    Langford, Bedfordshire, UK
    IMG_0183.JPG
     
    Pete. and Dieselkid 63 like this.
  15. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    What were they rated at? 75kg?
     
  16. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,173
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I've got a 1 ton lathe on four shopping trolley casters, no problem.
     
  17. Barlidge

    Barlidge Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    834
    Location:
    Langford, Bedfordshire, UK
    .
    Not sure to be hones but they came off a fairly heavy duty dolley
     
  18. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Got fed up with the awful weld on the handle, so I hack sawed it off. It was hard work, grinding through that stuff isn't easy either! I drilled a hole in the spindle, then tapped it. I will buy some bar or a bolt, thread it in then add a ball to the end. I'll see what's lurking in the free shelves at uni
     
  19. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Antipodean Tinkerer

    Messages:
    4,104
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Well uni is going to be shut for ANZAC day on Tuesday and I don't have anything Monday, so I couldn't wait. Got a long, 8" stainless bolt, sawed the hex head off the top and threaded it to BSW 1/2. I'll cut the other thread off (hidden by my hand), not sure whether to fit a ball or just leave it as a bar and round the edge off, it's a nice handle anyway.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    IMO a ball feels wrong (!) it would feel nicer if, when you get your lathe running, to make a teardrop shape like some other toolposts.
     
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