What is the best way to fix this

  1. Jlg

    Jlg Member

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    @brightspark do you know the best way to get rid of the rust inside of a petrol tank
     
  2. Paul.

    Paul. Moderator Staff Member

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    Northampton. UK
    Any decent tig hand will do that, no need to send it the length of the country, first thing to do is to decide if its actually aluminium, most are but some bike carbs are a zinc based die cast which cannot be welded using conventional means, thats when the solder type repairs such as lumiweld are useful, http://www.frost.co.uk/lumiweld-kits.html
    and another one here if you want to have a go yourself http://www.aluminiumrepair.co.uk/
     
  3. brightspark

    brightspark Member

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    yarm
    +++cillit bang and gravel and a good shake :)
     
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  4. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

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    5,035
    UK London
    Something I have done many a time: vinegar and nuts. Small enough they wont ding the metal, count them all in and count them back out. Seal all the ports and roll it around while shaking, not too violently iyswim, enough so you can feel them scouring the surface. I used those small square nuts you get with rack mounts....
     
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  5. Jlg

    Jlg Member

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    @Paul. how do you tell if it's aluminium
     
  6. Paul.

    Paul. Moderator Staff Member

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    Your welder will know, I strike an arc with the tig somewhere on the job, usually on the broken face, if it explodes in a black sooty mess then you have a problem, pretty sure honda parts are ally though
     
  7. Bsmith Member

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    2,028
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    No chance you could drill/thread both parts insert a piece of small bolt thread and screw them together with some locktite?
     
  8. Jlg

    Jlg Member

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    No I thought about it but it will be very hard as it's only 4 mm thick and about 15cm long
     
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  9. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

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    5,035
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    I was assuming the broken part is a small stub at 90 degrees to the shaft which goes though a hole (almost invisible) in picture 3. Without better pictures of what is actually broken and how it needs to reattach, it's kinda difficult to be precise.
     
  10. Jlg

    Jlg Member

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    2,094
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    image.jpeg
    @Screwdriver it is a small stub but what it pushes into on the other side of the hole isn't
     
  11. pedrobedro

    pedrobedro Man at Matalan

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    Could you fit a cheap ebay carb, plenty of them about for pit bikes and quads. Then fix it at your leisure.
     
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  12. Jlg

    Jlg Member

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    No I have tried there just to big
     
  13. dobbslc

    dobbslc Forum Supporter

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    What bike is itf from?
     
  14. Wallace

    Wallace Member

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    What Honda 50 is it, C100 or C50? Might have a C100 carb but I think that is a C50/65/70 carb.
     
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  15. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

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    5,035
    UK London
    I have fixed many smaller parts like this over the years and if it was me, I'd remanufacture a linkage connecting mechanism. Even a small steel bolt or machine screw will easily be strong enough, coupled with a tang on a washer etc or whatever design suits. My reasoning being if it has broken in the first place that demonstrates a weakness in the original design such that the repair needs to be better.

    Then again, I wouldn't dare try and TiG it myself. As has been said, even if the alloy is up for it, it needs to be comprehensively cleaned. Since it's been sitting in petrol for decades, needs ultrasonic/vapour blasting at least. It's such a small part, you need to give it the best possible chance.
     
  16. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

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    1,912
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    With those Ali brazing rods you can make a steel former and basically cast into what is there. When I fixed my water pump lug I formed a new lug using a steel former then heated it up and the braze formed a new piece. I think you can even cast a screw thread using a steel bolt for example.

    The reengineering idea is also good I think...basically make a new part that does the same thing.
     
  17. Jlg

    Jlg Member

    Messages:
    2,094
    Location:
    Cumbria
    While I took it too 4 shops today and the only one that would take it on wanted £45 a hour and sad it would take 3-4 hours to do it so I am going to trie the rods @Paul. and @Pigeon_Droppings2 said about
     
  18. Jlg

    Jlg Member

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    2,094
    Location:
    Cumbria
    A 1969 Honda c50
     
  19. Jlg

    Jlg Member

    Messages:
    2,094
    Location:
    Cumbria
    C50e
     
  20. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

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    1,912
    Location:
    london
    £45 an hour for 3 hours....I need to change my job I think! If you can make up a thin steel former I think will be more controllable... Or try to stick the broken bits together by tining the pieces and then heating

    I was impressed with the brazing...just watch one of the videos online. I seem to remember you have to break the existing oxide by scratching it. Good luck and hope it works out.

    Funny thing.. I was chatting to my mechanic and he was asking me if I could Tig Ali as there was good money to be made....now I see what he meant!!!
     
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