Weld not penetrating metal?

  1. Lockholder New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    KS, USA
    trying to weld a gooseneck plate into a farm truck, but the weld isn’t penetrating the metals. It’s just puddling I’m the metal not actually welding them together. I have a good ground and clean contacts. I’ve adjusted the wire feed speed too and haven’t been able to penetrate yet. Do I need to increase the feed speed more?
     
  2. Windy Miller Semi-Professional Potterer!

    Messages:
    2,896
    Location:
    North Kent, UK
    We could do with some pictures and an idea of what power your MIG is, and what thickness the steel is that you're trying to weld.

    And welcome to the forum by the way!
     
  3. Lockholder New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    KS, USA
    I’ll get you pictures right now and thank you!
     
  4. Lockholder New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    KS, USA
    Here are some pictures
     
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    • B7B572A1-ABC2-4B62-9B95-76F6902789AD.jpeg
  5. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,291
    Somerset
    You need a bigger welder is about the long and short of it.

    How thick is the steel...?
     
    stuvy, Richard., optima21 and 3 others like this.
  6. Lockholder New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    KS, USA
    1/2", so pretty much i need a bigger welder? i was afraid of that answer haha.
    I appreciate the help and quick replies
     
    stuvy likes this.
  7. Dcal

    Dcal Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,134
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    Have you access to a stick welder?
     
    stuvy, eLuSiVeMiTe and 123hotchef like this.
  8. anto44

    anto44 Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    Location:
    ireland
    For doing jobs like that stick welding is normally more suitable than mig.
     
  9. steviec_lj

    steviec_lj Rust Welding Professional

    Messages:
    2,708
    Location:
    Barnetby, N.Lincs
    1/2” wants 250a minimum using the 30a per mm..

    Multipass stick might do it
     
    BarrieJ, stuvy and Dcal like this.
  10. Lockholder New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    KS, USA
    i do not. It's not a life or death situation so i'm not to concern about it. i have a friend who has a bigger welder. What welder would work best for bigger projects say steel 1/2" and up? anything 120v?
     
  11. angellonewolf

    angellonewolf Member

    Messages:
    5,352
    Location:
    bristol england
    excuse for buying a new tool :whistle::laughing:
     
  12. Lockholder New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    KS, USA
    Already looking for a stick welder capable of doing 1/2” lol
     
  13. Dcal

    Dcal Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,134
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    By and large stick welders are sized by the size of the rod you want to use, the bigger the rod the bigger the welder.
    If you stick to 3.2mm rods a 150 or 160 amp stick welder would easily do your job (just takes more runs) if you go to 4mm you will need go for 180 or 200 amp one.

    On120v there are a few options but getting a true 120v machine might not be that easy, dual voltage is more common.
    I have a Thermal Arc 160a dual voltage welder and while it will output 160a on 240v it will only give 125a on 120v
    I have only used the 240v setting.
     
    Lockholder likes this.
  14. Dcal

    Dcal Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,134
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    Sorry just seen you in the good old US of A
    120v won't be a problem for you, but if you have 220v available (for a cooker circuit I think) I would also look into that.
     
    Lockholder likes this.
  15. Bill Edwards Member

    Messages:
    4,938
    Location:
    Scarborough, North Yorkshire
    In short, you need a much bigger welder if you want to use a MIG - I'd say 250 amps.

    If using stick 130 amps would be quite enough using 3.2mm rods - although with stick you can actually go smaller still if you're prepared to put more weld passes in with a smaller rod. Small rods with a stick welder will penetrate thick steel whereas a small MIG simply won't.

    As to what's available on a 120v power supply I don't know, but that should be easy enough to find out now you know what power the welder needs to be.
     
  16. Lockholder New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    KS, USA
    i did find a stick welder that is dual voltage. not to expensive and yes i'm in the USA, not EU. Hope that isn't an issue haha. but i don't mind doing more passes i would rather do more passes and get it done correctly and have it be sound then cut corners. i wish i could drop a good amount of money to get one that'll get all the jobs done single passes but sometimes it's not possible.plus this is a hobby for farm and mechanic work not professional work so cheap will work!
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  17. eddie49 Member

    Definitely try to get access to a 240v outlet ( cooker, washer/drier, or aircon circuit ).
    Older properties have a 15 Amp breaker on the 120v circuits - that is only 1800 Watts maximum. Newer homes are on 20 Amps, especially for kitchen outlets, which is 2400 Watts. You're not supposed to plug in a single device load of more than 80% of the socket circuit rating.
    The "Titanium 225" stick welder from Harbor Freight Tools is a dual-voltage inverter machine, with a DC output. It runs 70A maximum on 120v input, but can do 225 Amps when on a 240v outlet. It costs $250. The HFT "Vulcan" is their premium range.
     
    Lockholder likes this.
  18. Dcal

    Dcal Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,134
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    Good job.
    What size welder did you source?

    Just saw @eddie49 post and I agree with all he has said.
    He knows the American market way better than I do.

    A proper 120v machine would probably have better duties but the current requirements from the mains will double so a 240 or 220v is the way to go if possible.
     
    Lockholder likes this.
  19. Lockholder New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    KS, USA
    @Dcal i agree with you both, i had someone send me a useful video on "cheap stick welders" and it was really helpful and i'm currently still looking around to see what will work best, i only have one 220v (washer) and i would need a very long extension cord haha,but if that would work i'm willing to do it. I'm looking to see which one i can find that won't break bank, $250 isn't' bad, kinda high but if it's the only one that's relaible then so be it. in the very it was an amazon one HFL ARC160 (i think it's discontinue).
     
  20. angellonewolf

    angellonewolf Member

    Messages:
    5,352
    Location:
    bristol england
    there are a a few on here that got the older stick welder butlet proof for little money
     
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