Shaft and Hole Tolerance for interference fit.

  1. printcom Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    624
    Eccleshall
    Can anyone remember how to determine the necessary tolerance to get a nice tight interference fit on a 60mm shaft and hole in EN8. Usually I leave a few thou and using the oven and freezer the jobs a good un.

    This job is going to get some stick so it needs to be as tight as I can make it using a twenty tonne press.
     
  2. dan treg Member

    Messages:
    251
    Location:
    uk midlands
    can you not just look in a zeus book limits and fits ?
     
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  3. rory1

    rory1 Member

    Messages:
    1,136
    Location:
    Macclesfield
    someones gonna come along and say a thou an inch but really you should be looking in the engineers handbook and work out what you need
     
    daleyd likes this.
  4. printcom Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    624
    Eccleshall
    :doh: Your right I forgot they were catered for in the Zeus Book. Thanks chaps.
     
  5. roofman

    roofman Purveyor of fine English buckets and mops

    Messages:
    7,088
    Location:
    North West
    depends if you want a tight fit or a really tight fit...a really tight fit is 2 knocks with a cold chisel in 2 places before going on:D
     
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  6. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,822
    Location:
    halifax, England
    A discussion from earlier this month

    https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/press-fit-clearance.101015/

    you did have to mention "tight fit"....so Ive got this rattling around my head now, so I thought it would be rude not to share it. :D:D

     
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  7. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    9,031
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    pressfits.PNG
     
  8. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Part of it will depend on what you are pressing into, whether its a big solid chunk of steel, or a thin wall tube fabrication. One will flex and give, so you could run more interference, the other won't go anywhere, and you might need a 100 ton press to get your shaft in.
     
  9. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    6,872
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Limits and fits on the ISO hole basis, I will assume the standard 1980’s Technical College position. :D


    956B7C49-6363-4BDE-91F1-4FB41DE5A593.jpeg
     
  10. grim_d

    grim_d Unlikeable idiot.

    Messages:
    2,437
    Location:
    Scotland - Ayrshire
    EN8? Weld the sucker in after pressing. Won't come out then.

    Less angry option might be green loctite.
     
  11. printcom Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    624
    Eccleshall
    Hmmm, I also remember the blackboard rubber....
     
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  12. Tangledfeet

    Tangledfeet Not the 'hipster' Hood thinks I am...

    Messages:
    1,251
    Location:
    St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
    Me too! :thumbup:

    I actually bought That Green Book (you'll know the one) a year or two ago; pangs of nostalgia!
     
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  13. printcom Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    624
    Eccleshall
    Kids today don't know what they are missing - No blackboard rubbers, rulers, arm pinchs, flying chalks, pinched ears and canes. :laughing:
     
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  14. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    6,872
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    A cure for insomnia. :doh: :D
     
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  15. doubleboost

    doubleboost Member

    Messages:
    2,872
    Location:
    Newcastle upon Tyne England
    I did a built up crank for a steam engine
    1 inch pins gave them 3 thou heated the webs to dull red
    Co2 on the pins
    Slid together very nice
    Last one nipped up
    Twelve tons on the press at work to move it
    I still could not help my self and welded it
    crank.jpg crank 2.jpg
     
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  16. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Be interesting to see what the interference fit is on Japanese motorcycle engine cranks, as Allen Millyard regularly pulls them apart and reassembles for the wild motors he builds.

     
    doubleboost likes this.
  17. jerrytug

    jerrytug Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    649
    Location:
    Isle of Wight
    Amazing, I was literally just watching that film a minute ago!
    I was surprised he didn't use heat/cooling for the crank build like Doubleboost above.
     
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