Second attempt

  1. shorter_alexander Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Tunbridge wells
    Thanks so much, it was actually welded horizontally but the photo looks like it’s vertical. I’ll turn the gas up some more. What should it be running at?

    I bought a welder of eBay it’s a magnum I think it’s called, it seems really good, I’ve only done a tiny bit of welding before but have done millions of hours of soldering. I’ll get the gas turned up and give it another try! Thanks for the input it’s awesome!
     
  2. shorter_alexander Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Tunbridge wells
    I feel like I might be holding the arc a bit too close should it be about 10mm I’m probably about 5-6mm at the moment?
     
  3. Country Joe Argoshield Dark

    Messages:
    1,484
    Location:
    Somerset - United Kingdom

    I think the general rule that most peple use is 8-10 litres per minute, but there can be small losses along it's route, so the flow-rate at the torch end can sometimes read less (but also more accurately) than the regulator - so the pea-shooter flow meter bypasses any losses, and gives the reading from the torch - ovbiously after releasing the wire-feed tension, first!

    Regarding the arc - I find that if i have too short an arc-length, the shroud gets filled with crud, and needs cleaning out.
    I tend to use a reamer like this one:-
    Mig Nozzle Reamer.jpg

    I've not come accross those Magnum welders before, I see they make all sorts of welders - including transformer, and the inverter types, too.
    And all in that very distictive in bright yellow colour, too.
    ESAB won't like that colour choice very much - but I'm sure they're not too concerned, really!

    Obviously not having welded with one, either - I can't really comment on how "user-friendly" it is in use, but keep on changing the possible variables, and it'll suddenly fall into place.

    For a second attempt though, you have no worries so far - that fillet weld looks pretty good, as is - and it'll only get better as it gets easier/more routine.

    Keep on at it!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
  4. Country Joe Argoshield Dark

    Messages:
    1,484
    Location:
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    I'd have a slightly longer arc-gap on 3mm, than I'd have on 1mm, I would imagine.
    My current welder seems to favour a longer arc-length than the last one I used regularly, though.
    Look at it as yet another variable to experiment with, for now!

    That may be an inherent difference between transformers & inverters though.
    The inverter I use for MMA (stick) welding, will hold a very long arc, before it "goes out" - I tend to really whip it away to extinguish the arc!

    I realise that the very last line is virtually irrelevent to you, really - but hey, it's there, now!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
  5. shorter_alexander Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Tunbridge wells
    Thanks so much this is such great info. You were so right about the gas I bumped up the rate to 11-12lpm and the weld was so much cleaner and better looking. Think maybe it needs to be hotter though as it’s still not showing on the other side but weld definitely looks cleaner and better. I’ll turn the volts up a little tomorrow and see if i can get it to come through the back of the piece. Feel like I’m getting there, or at least getting a feel for it although my welds done look great at the moment. Thanks so much for your input it’s amazingly helpful.
     
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  6. tom2207 Member

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    1,604
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    uk northern ireland
    its on the improve ,, so your on the way ,,, the next forty years will see you quite good at it , after the next ten , you will be great , and an expert just as its time to retire ,,, lol
    As long as your enjoying it , that really is the secret , after that
    Patience and Practice.
     
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  7. shorter_alexander Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Tunbridge wells
    Hahaha, thanks Tom. I’m really enjoying it, I’ve been waiting to learn to weld for about 10years. I wish I hadn’t put it off for so long I might be able to do it if I hadn’t! I feel like it’s going to be very different learning on 1mm panels but I’ll keep at it. Best to get easier stuff down first I guess!
     
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  8. tom2207 Member

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    1,604
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    once you get the basics , the rest is just tweaking the machine and your own technique to suit , it really is about seat time ,, once it clicks into place you will find all sorts to weld , and make your self.
     
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  9. Country Joe Argoshield Dark

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    In post number 15, the steel you're using looks as if you've had to clean it up with a grinding disc?
    If doing thinnish materials, you might find a "flap-disc" is less aggressive in use, and is in less danger of thinning the steel (even more) as you grind the coating off.

    I'm assuming the coating being ground off is mill-scale, and not zintec coated, or even galvanised?
    That can produce a lot of extra mess while welding.

    Having said that, it doesn't look too "zincy", as that tends to leave a light coating of whitish residue behind.

    I've just seen your last (second to last, now - I type too slowly!) post, and it's looking a lot cleaner!
    It's got a bit of a grim melty-looking top edge to that piece - looks like one of my "too-slow" travel speed with a plasma-cutting torch events!

    When setting the wire-feed on an un-known or even just a "tricky" welder, I tend to turn it up untill you can feel it "stabbing" at the work-piece, and then just back it off untill it seems right for whatever setting I'm on.

    I've not done it this way in a while though, as mine just seems to "get lucky" on all settings!
    It was a handy technique while using the SIP MigMate, anyway!

    All very wise words - especially that second point.
    Maybe they'll become "old ancient proverbs" for new welders, some day in the future!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
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  10. Country Joe Argoshield Dark

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    1,484
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    Sort of getting into that tweaking stage now, really.
    From this point, it gets easier at a quicker pace, than at the very start.

    And it's more addictive than you'd think - you'll end up looking for things to weld, before very long!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
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  11. shorter_alexander Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Tunbridge wells
    Thanks CJ. Yeah only thing i had to hand to cut it was The worst cutting disc ever! I actually ordered a nibbler today To make cutting a bit easier. I have a Makita grinder but what do you guys use to cut steel with? Grinding seems like such an effort every time and its so loud I can’t hear myself think!
     
  12. angellonewolf

    angellonewolf Member

    Messages:
    5,236
    Location:
    bristol england
    search ebay for gas pea shooter ive got one it tells you the gas out of where the torch is saves on putting to much gas through at the torch end i got a clark and i just leave the unit powered off turn on the gas and put it to a little over 10

    on some welders you might have to just flip the wire feed off

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Country Joe Argoshield Dark

    Messages:
    1,484
    Location:
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    Alex - that is a very expansive question!

    And it usually depends on the situation, location, and what I'm faced with (along with what I can find!) - as opposed to any personal choice!

    I ususally use a 1mm slitting disc, as opposed to a chunky grinding disc for cutting smallish pieces of steel up.

    I also use a pair of Makita JS3201 shears, which are very good - but fairly pricey as I remember.
    And also an old Hypertherm PowerMax 380 plasma cutter, now that I've finally set it up correctly - but that's mainly thanks to @roblane65 - and is yet another story!

    I even used a hack-saw yesterday - but it was a one-off, as it was too awkward to locate or set up anything else - and there'll be a fair old gap before i do that again, I suspect!

    There are quite a few sets of (manual) hand-shears here, too - gilbow type & some aviation type things, too.

    Plus a couple of those evolution Rage saws.

    Oh, and a bandsaw, too - which is very good, as wee - if a bit slow - but, to me, it's ace, anyway!

    Those nibblers have a tendency to leave loads of hot, tiny, sharp, crescent moon-shaped pieces all over & all around you - if it's the kind of thing I'm thinking of.
    I believe @chunkolini is not one of their biggest fans - for that very reason!
    But grinders are pretty filthy too, I suppose - I've been getting darker by the day - I'm "reasonably heavily pigmented" naturally, but bathing in sweat & grinding dust all day has left me looking like a car tyre - but a different shape, of course!

    Anyway, I'm gonna stop here - as I'll keep thinking of more cutting tools, the longer this goes on - and I'm sure I'll have missed a few already!

    And I really need to clean up!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
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  14. Country Joe Argoshield Dark

    Messages:
    1,484
    Location:
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    That's just the thing I was thinking of - I think I got mine from here - on this very site, about 14 years ago!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
  15. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    1,604
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    as above ,, Ive a couple of toe nail machines ,,, aka nibblers , but the bits they leave are a pita , they stick in my boot soles , so unless i have to use them I dont , 115mm grinder and a 1,, slitting disc tends to be the choice if i cant get to a guillotine , just dont push on the disc , let it cut on its own weight and they do well , and remember , not all 1mm cutting discs are created equal.
    Saws are nice and handy but a pain to move , I prefer anything to chop saws though , but thats just a personal preference , many here love them .
    I think i have 28 grinders at the moment , so beware , ,, tools get addictive and expensive in relation to what you think you could do with ,, my advise ,two 115mm grinders one with a 1mm cutting disc and one with a flap disc , very efficient way of working ,, by the way all of my grinders still have guards on them.
     
  16. shorter_alexander Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Tunbridge wells
    Thanks CJ. Such invaluable advice
     
  17. shorter_alexander Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Tunbridge wells
    Awesome thanks Tom. I have two grinders actually so I shall be taking your advice, I was already bored of swapping over flap discs to cutting discs!
     
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