Powder coat setup - very rough costing?

  1. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,506
    Location:
    devon, uk
    As I understand you need -

    Powder
    Gun
    Oven
    Compressor
    (Mask)


    Anyway thing else?

    My parts are small so a 900mm domestic oven would fit them in, but would I need to mod it for some sort of phased heating cycle? I didn't get the impression that was required.

    So the only other thing that im (possibly wrongly?) under the impression I need is the gun (and ancillary parts)

    Again, I only deal with low volume, small parts, so don't need some sort of continuous feed setup.


    I'm real early in my reading, so working out if I need to spend a few hundred or more like a thousand to setup?



    Thank you.
     
  2. armalites Member

    Messages:
    4,759
    Herefordshire
    Have a look at Devin Niemela on Youtube, he works on Evos and STI but he does quite a bit of powder coating.

    He is using a cheapish gun and an old oven. He manages to do 17" wheels in there and gets really good results. He also does quite a few small bits like brake calipers.
     
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  3. James1979 Member

    Messages:
    306
    Location:
    Orkney
    Watching this as I'm in the same boat. Going to see my neighbour later, as he makes creels (Pots) for fishing. He powder coats his own but its a reverse system ie he heats the steel then puts it in the cold powder? Gets really good results. Reckons he made it himself for £200. I'm going to see how it all works and if I can duplicate it. Will post what I find on here if you like?
     
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  4. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

    Messages:
    15,033
    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    That sounds more like a fludiser bath, where air is blown through the powder, usually using a hover in reverse
     
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  5. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    3,867
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    Checkout Martin from Retro Restore on YouTube, He's a hobby powdercoater

    How big an item do you want to powdercoat?

    I've had plenty of stuff powdercoated over the years for very little cost tbh. So unless you're going to use it often, Then it might not be worth it
     
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  6. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,506
    Location:
    devon, uk

    The issue is more that the closest powdercoater is rubbish. They do not answer their phone, so you have to drive over there. Somtimes someone is about, somtimes not. It's just so time consuming.

    It's not so much about cost, but that I'd rather not have to mess about.
     
  7. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    3,867
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    @julianf Totally understand, I'm quite lucky in that I have quite a few around me
     
  8. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Yes please :thumbup:
     
  9. fizzy Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    5,929
    uk
    I have never been a fan of powder coating as I have seen too many items where there has been a small chip and then rust gets underneath etc.
    BUT - if it was primed first with an epoxy primer surely that would cure the problem? Also there are 2 kinds of powder coat I think? Epoxy and polyester?
     
  10. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,506
    Location:
    devon, uk
    I don't think you can do it over paint, as it's applied using electrostatic attraction.

    I too hate powedercoat. I'd never powder anything of my own. But my customers have been convinced that it's the best thing ever so I can either try and talk them out of it, and come over like a salesman, or just give them what they want.
     
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  11. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    3,867
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    @julianf I'm pretty sure you can powdercoat over epoxy primer
     
  12. Little Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Australia
    You only need the compressor to sandblast the parts to give it a good etching surface. If you get a sandblast cabinet you will also need a shop vac and a cyclone dust remover mated to a bucket so you dont clog up your vacuum constantly.

    The cheap units usually have a grounding lead connected to the unit itself, when I replaced that with an actual 4mm ground cable and earthed it to an earthing rod the quality of the powder coating improved dramatically. You also want a unit that can vary the khz for multiple coat applications.

    I got my setup just to learn and was restoring a couple old chainsaws as practice.

    If you look at the below image of one of the yellow saw you can see the difference between the air filter cover and starter cover vs the other parts....thats the difference the grounding change made - the powdercoat was smoother (less grainy) and had a deeper colour

    mac6.jpg

    chainsaw3.JPG
    [​IMG]
     
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  13. James1979 Member

    Messages:
    306
    Location:
    Orkney
    Went over today and he was out with his creel boat. I'll try agin the morn
     
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  14. northwest

    northwest Member

    Messages:
    1,330
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    My cousin made quite a bit of money in the 90's scraping powder coating (coming off in sheets) from structural steelwork and repainting. This would not be the case today though as the powder has come on leaps and bounds. Having said that, I would paint structural steelwork or outdoor steelwork. Everything in my workshop is powder coated.

    Putting it on isn't the problem. The paint bubbling underneath when you put it in the oven is.
     
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