Photos of my "platform trolley welds" and an accident

  1. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

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    Yeah have been looking at more tonight as my current pairs feel like they might show holes any day now. Noticed a lot of gloves that have 'cut 4 or 5' have much lower 'abrasion score' and vice versa.

    I have chainsaw gloves, but they'd be a bit bulky for using with a grinder i'd think and only one of them as any real depth of Kevlar, even then I'm not sure how good they'll be against a grinding disc. My Emeralds have been good to me so far; first time not wearing them... ain't that always the way lol
     
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  2. stuvy

    stuvy Member

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  3. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

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    ive removed mine for access but sometimes i will for a longer blade in a smaller blade grinder 4.5"/5" discs

    as goes for not using a handle that was a large no no even from me that handle just gives you that extra bit of grip on the device

    also to say that handle is close to the disc to a degree but when its spinning and you remove your hand is when you can catch it on the blade spinning
     
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  4. skotl

    skotl Forum Supporter

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    That's a lot of protective equipment...
    ...but most of it (with the exception of the face shield) are designed to protect you when you're using tools that aren't a grinder.
    You know this now, but it's the hands that are closest to the grinder so that's where you should have concentrated (and eyes, of course). Your statement above reads a little like "I was using an angle grinder so I put three helmets on for extra protection!" :D (that's a joke, by the way...)

    I always wear welding gloves when grinding, primarily because of the sparks and shrapnel, plus a face shield. Possibly a facemask if I'm grinding something particularly grotty...

    ...and I've never taken the guards off - thankfully not been in a position where I've needed to. I also don't use the side handle - I find it easier to control with two hands on the body.
     
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  5. daedalusminos Member

    Messages:
    655
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    I don't think any practical glove will provide much protection against a grinding disc or flapwheel, worse is that you might gain a sense of greater safety than they offer and take more risks.

    They do help protect against sparks and cuts from adjacent metal work but little else. I typically wear nitrile or latex dipped cotton knit gloves around the workshop they offer a degree of protection but are not too bulky.

    I've got four angle grinders, one dedicated for polydiscs does not have a guard, the others do - though I rarely use the side handle.
     
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  6. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

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    Sounds silly in the context of this thread; but I'm typically well prepared with PPE, as many issues that you can encounter when fabricating as you'll know are cumulative. I've had a few moments where I've not bothered with hearing protection or my respirator then catch myself and try and stay in the habit of wearing the gear to maintain good habits. I know people who never bothered with hearing protection at work and recreation, one is now partially deaf and the other as tinnitus.

    Wore the overalls because I was due to doing some welding after cleaning up the material, and both grinding sparks and welding sparks damaged a pair of jeans the last time I didn't bother. Had the respirator on largely because I was removing some paint and I didn't want to breath any of that dust in; same with grinding the slag/fluxcore welds.

    Safety glasses under full face shield is a new habit I'm trying to adapt to, not helped by my face shield being pretty crap, this is the requirement for when I'm doing my practical work at the fabrication centre for my course, so it makes sense for me to get into the habit, and with grinding in multi-positions sometimes the sparks make it under my full face shield - and because it's crap, it also tends to fall off.

    I appreciate people clearing up my thoughts on the use of gloves with an angle grinder, I had doubts they were appropriate but will resume using them now.
     
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  7. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Hmmmm. Maybe, maybe not....:D

    upload_2019-7-14_12-53-4.jpeg
     
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  8. Dcal Member

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    1,322
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    I always wear eye protection and ear protection when I'm grinding.
    If you don't you will do damage to yourself, either in the short term (eyes) or in the long term (hearing loss)
    I wish I was more particular when I was younger and my hearing would be better now.

    I "sometimes" wear gloves and flame retardant overalls, but can honestly say I never rely on them for protection, it's more for comfort.
    My gloves of choice are tig gloves which probably don't give much protection but does keep the splinters at bay.
    I'm sure there is so much steel in me I'll probably never be able to have a MRI scan.
    This is "not" a recommendation it's just what I do.

    You need to improve your technique so that you are not relying on your PPE.
    If you are taking lumps out of your gloves you need to have a look at what you are doing and how you are doing it.

    Use the right grinder and disc for the job and make sure the guards and handles are fitted. The handle is removable so that it can be fitted for right hand or left hand operation.
    It's not an optional extra.

    Don't use even a small grinder single-handed, if the piece you need to grind is moving about clamp it in a vice or workmate, so you don't have to hold it. If you can't clamp it don't grind it.
    If both hands are on the tool you will have better control and you will know your hands are out of the danger area.
    Always grind so the sparks are being directed away from your body (especially your face) Be conscious of where the sparks are going and the damage they can do.
    When you get confident using the tool you can make your own judgment but for now I would stick to the above.

    You should think of a grinder in the same way you would a chainsaw or circular saw.
    Would you take the guards off a wood saw?
    A grinder will not be as merciless, but can still make a mess and it a good way to think about it.
    There is a reason why single handed chainsaw are not available to the general public and to a lesser extent the same approach should apply to grinders.

    And finally don't go anywhere near 9 inch grinder until you are confident, they can really bite.
     
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  9. Wallace

    Wallace Member

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    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    :clapping: You have to make them first! :D

    Guard type and angle is worth mentioning. My old 'go to' B&D 4.5" grinder has a nice guard that can be rotated between stops to a suitable position without the use of a hex key, spanner or screwdriver and stays where set. The others either have to be left set in position or have the clamp screws just tight enough to move without tools depending on how balanced they are vibration wise.

    Some discs have added depth or offset that leave the disc proud of the guard as the grinder guard has been designed for a standard cutting or grinding disc, most noticeable on older tools and probably the worst for sitting outside the guard is the Poly Strip paint removal and wire brush types as the guard does not cover the extended disc. The twisted knot wire wheels can bite badly (I have the scars), not only spitting loose wire strands 360° at high speed past the guard but grabbing loose clothing, gloves and unsecured work. The cup brush is a particularly nasty little git and the second handle helps to tame them but for a novice they are best left alone until proficient with a grinder, in fact a brick wall between the grinder and cup brush is much safer. :eyepatch:
     
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  10. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

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    Cup brushes are evil nasty vicious little things, but very effective
     
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  11. bourbon Member

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    480
    Location:
    Lichfield UK
    Nah. they are gothic. Much better with Milanese, less fancy bits to catch
     
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  12. Wallace

    Wallace Member

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    I still think of Chunkolini doing the Highland Fling dance of death on a runaway grinder every time I look at one. :laughing:
     
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  13. Farside

    Farside Badly Welded Man

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    A way of taming that beast is a variable speed grinder, and leave it set at low to medium speed. It's just as effective as at high speed, because it's not bouncing all over the place and shedding wires into your t-shirt and belly.
     
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  14. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    Have a couple but never used em.
    Tend to use wire brushes in an old angle drill.
    Slower speed and better control.
     
  15. Moose McAlpine

    Moose McAlpine Member

    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Watford Hertfordshire
    While it's definitely true you don't wear gloves around some equipment*, i always do with grinders. I wear leather driver/rigger gloves (Wells Lamont from Amazon, 27 quid for 3 pair, very nice gloves.) for most of my garage work.

    I've slipped with grinders numerous times and clipped the edge of the glove, which has saved my hands, usually using flap discs, of course a cutting wheel will likely go right through but you tend to have both hands firmly on the grinder for cutting.

    I always use the "lawyer guard" and hate grinders without them, very dangerous things. They sure got no mercy!

    *You never operate a lathe, mill, drill press, etc with gloves on or long sleeves down to your wrists. You only ever see machinists running them with their sleeves rolled up and bare-handed as a glove or sleeve will easily get caught and drag them in. Lathes are more than capable of removing limbs.

    I hope you heal up and recover soon!
     
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  16. Moose McAlpine

    Moose McAlpine Member

    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Watford Hertfordshire
    I bought one of these the other day:

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/swiss-one-shape-premium-face-shield-clear/4690v?_requestid=430771

    Very good quality, good fit and adjustment and not too expensive. Well worth 20 quid.

    Could be worth a look if yours is giving you issues, i did have to click and collect though as it's not an item they stock in-store.
     
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  17. Paul.

    Paul. Moderator Staff Member

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  18. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

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    688
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Thank you. Have a dressing on for 3 days, then have to keep steri-strips on for a further 4 days after that. Seems I was lucky and didn't hit any tendons, cut looks deep enough regardless.

    I was surprised how little blood there was, although by the time I got to A&E the teatowel bandage I used was red all over. Apparently sharp cutting blades such as knives produce a lot more blood than an abrasive wound; which probably saved me from passing out on the floor. I've passed out through blood loss before, so got help straight away in case of that eventuality.

    Think I'll dig up a FFD and have one handy in my PPE bag.
     
  19. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    688
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Forget where I got mine from, but it's just a piece of elastic to hold the visor on your head and it falls off quite a bit, or slips. Will certainly invest in a better one.
     
  20. Muckmagnet

    Muckmagnet Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    53
    Location:
    East Riding. UK
    You were very lucky, I did similar last year with an angle grinder that suddenly decided the on/off switch was going to stick. Ended up taking my right hand glove off to try and get it to switch on, obviously got a bit overly rough with it but it did start but the handle ( left hand ) turned in it's thread and the grinder spun round somehow leaving my right index finger looking a bit gruesome . Off to local A&E, then to plastics at the big hospital, I was lucky, the tendon had been ground out to look like a section of guttering but not cut through, all opened up, cleaned out and stitched, hurt for months afterwards.
    Big grinders make my nuts go tight.:(
     
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