Photos of my "platform trolley welds" and an accident

  1. Yamhon New Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    I recently posted in the "today I made thread", having gotten back to that project - adding removable cable tidy hooks to my platform trolley - I've decided to share a few photos I took today. As a bit of a cautionary tale to others I'll also share an accident I had today.

    Here you can see how the frame I constructed looks in relation to the platform trolley with the welder in position. Once finished, I'll be bolting on large hooks to the front of this frame to hang my power cable up out of the way for my welding machine and maybe my return lead. The hooks are to be removable so I can still fold the trolley flat when I need to transport it.
    20190713_161723.jpg

    Some close up pictures of the welds. I've only every ran a coupe of lines of flux core on a flat piece of metal before, so this is really my first attempt. I had a few problems keeping the "bead" where I wanted and occasionally had too much stick out, I'm sure I'll improve with more practice.
    20190713_161739.jpg

    20190713_161904.jpg

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    20190713_161808.jpg

    I was given the small disposable gas bottle; not sure if there is anything in it. I've hooked it up, but won't be using it, until I purchase a cylinder in addition as I didn't want to change out the wire just for a very small amount of gas.

    The settings I used are reflected in the photo below; I got guidance from this websites calculator and also the Miller welding calculator, and dialed back every so slightly from what was suggested as this wire from Machine Mart seems to "run hot".

    Now for the bad news.

    I decided to try out one of my new flap discs - having never used one before - on smoothing out the welds and removing a bit more paint, so I can then place some welds on the front of the frame before drilling out some holes and applying some primer.

    Despite the heat; having already damaged clothes with sparks the last time I didn't bother, I put on my FR overalls, hearing protection, googles and face shield... and perhaps because a press stud was broken on one of my sleeves - forcing me to roll it up some - I opted to not wear my cut resistant gloves, which I usually wear when grinding or handling materials.

    Having never used a flap disc before, and having seen many videos on YouTube of them being used without a guard, that is the option I went for; so I removed the grinding guard on my Clarke angle grinder, fitted the flap disc and got started on cleaning up the previous welds.

    Very soon into that process I cut myself from the flap disc in my left hand (I'm right handed) and realised; being used to using an angle grinder with the guard, my supporting left hand must have crept up the handle and allowed part of my hand to come into contact with the fast moving flap disc.

    I adjusted my grip and got back to work, soon after, it happened... my new flap disc tore into my hand causing a significant cut, I straight away put the tool down and got dropped off at A&E.

    Lessons learned: 1. Having been cut, I should have taken that as a warning and changed more of what I was doing, not just adjusted my hand position. 2. If I replaced then side handle after I removed it when working in a confined space, this probably wouldn't have happened. 3. If I worked with the guard on this probably wouldn't have happened.

    How do people feel about wearing gloves with handheld angle grinders? I normally do, but wasn't sure it was appropriate, as I've heard you shouldn't wear gloves with spinning equipment.
     
  2. Parm

    Parm Metal Tinkerer

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    The guard is there for a reason !!
     
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  3. earthman Member

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    541
    Good question about the use of gloves with handheld grinders, personally I do, well fitting ones whenever possible and I try not to change my grip once in use.
    Guards are a must for me although sometimes they prevent you actually getting in to some areas, I can see why some folk remove them but IF a cutting disk shatters, it's not worth it. Sorry to hear that even a flap disc caused such injury to you.
     
  4. Yamhon New Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Yup; only ever removed it before when using a poly disc, for some reason I had in my head that you was supposed to remove the guard when using flap discs. I think with no guard and not using the side handle there is a high probability of the same injury happening and in the exact same place, so I'll always use the guard in future and when the guard needs to be removed I'll use the side handle to keep my supporting hand away from the disc area.
     
  5. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    Never use a grinder without one that’s for idiots

    Secondly thin gloves are fine and will be ok for day to day use

    Your welds look too cold and no penetration. A hammer will say if there stein enough
     
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  6. Yamhon New Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    The silly thing is, despite the hot weather I was wearing goggles without breathing holes, respirator, hearing protection and a face shield and FR overalls and boots... and I still got caught out, guess you can never be too careful. Listen learned, I hope.

    I've already attached the guard back in place, it didn't come to me until I had everything put away, but next time I'm working I'll fit the side handle as well; had to remove it previously when working in a confined space, but that isn't the case right now.
     
  7. Yamhon New Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    I think the opposite might have been true tbh; I was blowing holes in even the angle which I guess is around 3mm thick; as such when I spotted a hole or my bead went away from where I wanted to I ran more weld on top, which probably built it up too much - I realized later that I didn't always brush between doing this as well, so that might have also caused an issue.

    I've not taken an hammer to it, as I didn't want to damage the trolley itself by beating on it, although I've pulled and pushed on it a good bit and there isn't any movement or flex in what I welded up, only in the trolley itself.

    I'm totally new to this though, so I could be wrong.
     
  8. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    If that’s the case for moving too slow
     
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  9. Wonderweaver New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    Manchester
    Sorry to hear about your accident---lesson learnt. Americans seem to use angle grinders without guards but for me it's a necessity and very few situations requires their removal. Wear gloves always when working with metal cos it's harder and sharper than you. Using grinders effectively saftely takes time ,they can kick back on you so keep 2 hands on the grinder. If you was working with me and I seen you do what you did I would of told you immediately and shown you how. Hope this helps --don't want to sound like I'm telling you off .Accidents are preventable or at least you can minimise the likelihood.
     
  10. Yamhon New Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Sounds like it to me; looking forward to next attempt.
     
  11. Yamhon New Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    It's important to learn the right ways and learn from ones mistakes. First time I've used the grinder without gloves, typically eh, although probably wouldn't have done much to help in this case. I find them help with sparks and general Jabberwocky being flung at my hands from discs though.
     
  12. Parm

    Parm Metal Tinkerer

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    Location:
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    It comes across that perhaps your not a very experienced user of tools?

    Go carefully and get some instruction tuition if you can
     
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  13. Bladevane

    Bladevane Member

    Messages:
    432
    Location:
    Harwell, Oxon
    I am amazed at the number of "professionals" who post educational videos without the appropriate and necessary PPE and it is unfortunate that most of these seem to be our American cousins. Whether it is a gung ho attitude or because H&S regulation is not so stringent out there I don't know. Either way it is irresponsible.
     
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  14. Wonderweaver New Member

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    17
    Location:
    Manchester
    Yeah lots of cowboys over there
     
  15. Yamhon New Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    That would be a fair comment; done the odd bit of DIY before, mostly electrics, but not for quite a few years. Have only used an angle grinder once before buying this one and that was many years ago. I've done loads of grinding with this, but I'm still new to it I'd say, first time ever using a flap disc of any description.

    I'm studying a fabrication course atm, but it as been all theory so far.
     
  16. Parm

    Parm Metal Tinkerer

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    Location:
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    See if you can get a local tradesman, maybe even a forum member local to you to go through the basics
     
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  17. pedrobedro

    pedrobedro Man at Matalan

    Messages:
    9,514
    Location:
    CX Derbyshire
    I always wear gloves as anything I do with metal either makes it hot so it burns me or sharp so it cuts me. It's common sense to use the guard on your grinder don't take any notice of what the American youtubers do . Adjust the guard to a convenient position but don't remove it.
     
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  18. Yamhon New Member

    Messages:
    119
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Wilco.
     
  19. anto Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Ireland
    I have removed the guard perhaps 2 or 3 times in 15 years of using one. Only ever to gain access to something. Hated using it like that. When I see the likes of OCC using them regularly without one I wonder how they still have all their fingers.
     
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  20. J1nx

    J1nx Member

    Messages:
    233
    Location:
    Somerset UK
    Always use the guard but gloves I’m never quite sure, a snagged glove could cause worse injuries than bare hand in some instances. I wear gloves a lot but rotating machines it’s always case by case. I brushed a flap disc against some cut5 gloves and was surprised that it went through very easy, the cut5 are excellent at resisting knife blades etc but seemingly not the discs so chose type carefully too.
     
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