Old Workshop - Lathe & Drill

  1. GSR Member

    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Kent
    Morning All,
    I picked up a lathe and a drill last night from a home workshop and wondered if anybody would be able to help identify them?
    The lathe was sold as a Myford ML7, however now that its home I cant see any Myford markings or name on it and I cant say that it particularly looks like other ML7s that Ive googled - it may just be missing the guards - I dont know, any advice and opinions would be most welcome.

    IMG_1684.JPEG

    The drill is of similar vintage I think, again I cannot see any manufacturer on it, so open to suggestions:
    IMG_1686.JPEG
     
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  2. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Forum Supporter

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  3. GSR Member

    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Kent
    Thanks - thats great. Now I can get search as to how it goes back together - the motor is unbolted but its not as obvious as I was expecting! There are only 2 mounting feet on the motor, both on the same side...
     
  4. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Forum Supporter

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    Well it's probably not the original motor. These machines also seem to lose their treadles over time.
     
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  5. zx9

    zx9 Member

    Messages:
    4,325
    Location:
    South East London
    It is indeed a Drummond M the manufacture of which was moved to Myford for the war effort, basically Drummond were ordered to only make their bigger lathes whilst parts and production of the 3 1/3 " lathes moved to Myford, the later ones have Myford cast into the change wheel covers.
    Almost nothing is interchangeable between the Drummond lathes and the Myford ML7, ML10, ML4 etc.

    You will need to construct a counter shaft to step down the motor speeds probably a reduction of 3x or so if you have a normal 230V motor, a picture of the specification plate on the motor would help to point you in the right direction.

    Edit: I forgot to say you have a 'tumble reverse' (lever to the left of head stock) and a thread dial indicator (to the right of apron acting on the lead screw. Both very useful additions that have been made to the lathe.
    Edit No2:
    There is something else interesting around the hand wheel on the tail stock. Can we have a few more pictures please?

    @MattF Some interesting bit on this one!
     
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  6. GSR Member

    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Kent
    Thanks for the info above. With the identification of it being a Drummond M type, I now have a clearer idea of how it should go back together - im not convinced this is how the previous owner had it mounted on the bench though, whatever way I turn or rotate it the belt on the countershaft ends up twisted, unless the mounting bracket is reversed.
    Here are a few more pictures, would be great to hear what I have got - Ive never had a lathe so am a complete newbie IMG_1691.JPEG IMG_1692.JPEG IMG_1693.JPEG IMG_1694.JPEG IMG_1695.JPEG IMG_1687.JPEG IMG_1688.JPEG
     
    • IMG_1696.JPEG
  7. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,972
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    I'd say that the motor needs turning so that the pulley is on the right. You then have a belt from that to the countershaft and a further belt from the countershaft to the spindle. This gives a range of six speeds.
     
  8. GSR Member

    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Kent
    And make the big pulley completely redundant?
     
  9. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,972
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    No. The motor drives the group of three pulleys which turn the shaft on which the large two pulleys are. These turn the lathe spindle, unless there's something glaringly obvious that I'm missing.
     
  10. zx9

    zx9 Member

    Messages:
    4,325
    Location:
    South East London
    Looks like the cone pulley on the counter shaft is the wrong way round, reverse it so the big cone on the counter shaft is opposite to the small pulley on the spindle then move the counter shaft over to the left such that the two cones are in line.
    As @Seadog says the small pulley on the motor drives the big pulley on the counter shaft (slowing the drive down) the speed of the spindle is then determined by the use of the cone pulleys and the back gear.
    Back gear is operated by a leaver on the back of the head stock (left) and a locking screw in the front of the bull gear ( bull gear lives under the arched cover just to the left of the spindle nose.

    The counter shaft tensions the belt between the two cone pulleys by an adjustable rod which attaches to the rear of lathe just as the cast foot starts to sweep up at the change wheel end of the lathe. The bracket for the adjuster is often also the arm that holds the cast iron change wheel cover on later lathes you may not have it on a short bed.
    I can't help with how the motor mount fits to the counter shaft as mine has a home made counter shaft / motor mount.
    Do a google images search for Drummond bench counter shaft, will get the idea from the pictures.

    There was a Yahoo Drummond group which moved on to IO groups they have loads of information, pictures and drawings which should keep you out of trouble for a while.
    I did find a serial number v year table at one point in the files section of the old group but don't ask me to find it in a hurry, as everything was moved over it will be there somewhere,
     
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  11. winchman

    winchman Member

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    3,771
    Location:
    Merseyside
    Ours still has its treadle!
     
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  12. zx9

    zx9 Member

    Messages:
    4,325
    Location:
    South East London
    That one never had one, it has an original bench counter shaft.
     
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  13. zx9

    zx9 Member

    Messages:
    4,325
    Location:
    South East London
    Looking at the pictures again, I see that the combined baring spreaders and oilers have been covered with crimped over copper pipe, need to have a look at that before you run the lathe up.
     
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  14. Agroshield Member

    Messages:
    1,367
    On the countershaft/motor mounting, do not discount the possibility that one might have been wall-mounted (i.e. the screws into the feet were horizontal). Especially with the motor, letting its own weight tension the belt was quite common. It also meant that a primitive clutch could be provided by lifting the motor.
     
  15. MattF

    MattF Member

    Messages:
    10,726
    Location:
    South Yorkshire, England
    They'll likely be slip fit covers to prevent swarf/dust getting in there.
     
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  16. GSR Member

    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Kent
    Having spent an hour or so looking and playing with it, I think you are very correct in saying the motor is free hanging under it’s own weight.

    It has been very temporarily lashed up tonight to check it works etc - will now get on with making a suitable bench for it and make the fittings/mounts suit.

    Anybody have any thoughts on bench material - wood or steel?

    Thanks
     
  17. GSR Member

    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Kent
    Yes - they pull off very easily
     
  18. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,900
    UK London
    I see that now in the later pictures. Looks like a good find. Nice bit of kit. Proper old school quality.
     
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  19. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Forum Supporter

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    6,900
    UK London
    If you bolt it down to wood you can easily put a bend in it. Of course over the years, that may already have happened. The whole purpose of a lathe is to hold a number of items in perfect alignment and once you get into it, it is amazing just how many different ways each part can become displaced from the axis.

    Depending on how fussy you are (and what you're planing on doing) the best bet is a good solid steel base which you build flat (!), rest the lathe on it and shim it before bolting down. You can add/remove shims to dial out any twist. My colchester is the next size up and it is incredible to discover that relatively massive chunk of cast iron will noticeably twist just by adjusting the feet.
     
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  20. MattF

    MattF Member

    Messages:
    10,726
    Location:
    South Yorkshire, England
    I like wood myself. Currently have my Drummond mounted on it's original stand, but I's seriously contemplating making a wooden stand for it instead. Due to an uneven floor & how the countershaft is mounted, I can feel vibration when I'm using it, & also see it affecting the finish slightly. It would be a lot easier to solidify it by making a good wooden bench, than by trying to faff with its current stand.
     
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