New DSG to me

  1. brnomauser Member

    Messages:
    74
    Location:
    Australia NSW
    So I’ve just moved house/job and this beauty is already resident in the old farm workshop... I’m not a full on noob with lathes but I’ve had no formal training and this seems quite a bit more complex than the worn out primitive lathe at my last work. I don’t think it’s been used for a good 10 years, possibly longer. It was purchased second hand about 50 years ago at a guess, but I have a few papers on it. Nothing genuinely useful though, I’m thinking of buying a manual from lathes.co.uk but it’ll be at least 4 weeks to get here. Any idea on a build date?

    I’m just looking for a few pointers I guess... all the oil points have been greased, I’m planning on converting a lever grease gun to an oil gun, can I just blast the oil through the grease?

    I’ll change the headstock oil and clean the filter, and oil all the fittings I can find, but is there anything else I should be checking/doing before firing it up? I’ll try and get some slide way oil although might have to use 68 hydraulic Oil or 80w90 to start with. What’s the best oil for the gearbox - is GL4 80w90 ok?

    I need to give it a serious bath, Im thinking maybe a mix of petrol/solvent degreaser in a pneumatic spray gun?

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  2. mtt.tr

    mtt.tr Member

    Messages:
    2,955
    Essex England
    brnomauser likes this.
  3. jordan1 Member

    Messages:
    2,054
    Location:
    Yorkshire England
    I would check that it is salvageable and in good sound order before putting too much time & money into it.:)
     
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  4. brnomauser Member

    Messages:
    74
    Location:
    Australia NSW
    Well I’ve given it a preliminary once over. Can’t get any bearing play from the headstock or looseness from the slides. I put in gear and rotated it by hand several times after checking the oil level. Then I started it up and all speeds and clutch are working and sounding very quiet and smooth - didn’t run it for long but I reckon with a clean and service she’ll be functional at the least
     
  5. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,598
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    First thing - clean the ways off, brake cleaner and fine wire wool, see whether they're knackered already - that's the one "part" you can't sort easily for less than buying a new, cheap, Chinese Cheese lathe...

    Don't use petrol with the degreaser, unless you have a traveling salesman, vice and innocent-minded daughter and can leave a hacksaw nearby. Diesel''s OK though.

    I've had some success pumping brake cleaner through greased oil fittings, followed by paraffin, then the rightish grade of oil - anyone filling oil fittings with grease should have the grease gun applied to 'em :(
     
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  6. Spark plug

    Spark plug Member

    Messages:
    3,602
    Location:
    Durham, England
    Not sure about the older machines like yours but with mine the end of the serial number indicates the build date:

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    For example mine was built August 1975
     
    pressbrake1 likes this.
  7. brnomauser Member

    Messages:
    74
    Location:
    Australia NSW
    yeah I was a bit ****** off. That’s after digging as much grease out as possible I guess? Some of the oil fittings look like they go into a housing though so not sure if I’d see brake cleaner running out... sounds like a good plan though will give it a go. I’ll get onto the slides first, i I think eyeballing them they looked ok. Sorry I’m really struggling with your petrol/salesman reference - I just can’t connect the pieces!

     
  8. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,598
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    A Very Old Dirty Joke - travelling salesman's car breaks down and he knocks on the door of a farmhouse, answered by a stunning but rather innocent young girl... and what happens when he calls again a year later.

    Last line of the LONG joke: Farmer says "I'm not going to cut it off, I'm going to burn the barn down..."

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
  9. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,415
    essex england
    She looks a fine old lady to me.
    On high end machinery everything is better designed out of better materials.
    DSG metallurgy and foundry was legendary.
    Do as your doing!
    Slideway oil has an additive to make it sticky for situations like vertical ways on mills etc.
    Never really been a fan of it on lathe beds for this reason. On dsg up to the early seventies the feed drop out has a very good fit and relies on gravity. Sticky way oil stops that happening, don’t ask me how I know!
    A lot of industrial oil dealers sell it cheap as they have unused stock and it’s really useful for soaking a abandoned machine.
     
    Ali likes this.
  10. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

    Messages:
    15,279
    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    I think it might have Pitch Pine in it. Rocol cutting oil does, it stains everything
     
    Keith 66 likes this.
  11. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,415
    essex england
    Gilbert-Lodge the dealer are still going, why don’t you contact them incase they have record of it.
    I don’t think it’s as old as you think , I reckon mid 1930’s.
    The septics were much more advanced with certain machine tools than us at that point. A late 1930’s monarch will have a Timken bearing headstock and camlock spindle!
    Our capstan/ turret lathes were highly advanced by the thirties though
     
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  12. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    8,506
    Location:
    Essex
    It is mad that they were using camlock and we were still selling lathes with threaded spindles.
    Although the American L type spindle nose are pretty common here on Harrison’s and Colchester’s of the 60s, must of been a real leap forward at the time compared to threaded.
     
  13. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,415
    essex england
    Monarch invented the camlock spindle.
    Dsg has their own version but went camlock in the sixties.
    Big bore lathes use din fitting which is very similar to Lang’s fitting
     
    Dieselkid 63 likes this.
  14. northwest

    northwest Member

    Messages:
    1,489
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    As @pressbrake said, looks fine to me. I don't think it would take much to have her looking really nice. I like all my stuff to be as well presented as possible and a couple of hours with a load of wire wool and some light oil and you wouldn't recognise it.
    I would be looking round for a four jaw though.
     
    Brad93 likes this.
  15. a111r Member

    Messages:
    463
    Location:
    London
  16. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,415
    essex england
    Elgamills are still very sought after, bed mills being far superior to knee mills
     
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  17. minimutly Member

    Messages:
    1,120
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire Wales
    Ah, did the farmer put the tool in the vice, in the barn?
    Normally when I've bought a house I end up clearing out somebody else's mess, some people find a Rolls Royce of lathes lurking in the shed. Cool eh?
     
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  18. brnomauser Member

    Messages:
    74
    Location:
    Australia NSW
    Thanks guys. Did a little more inspecting today - cleaned the slides pretty thoroughly with rags and brake cleaner just to get a look at them. Made sure there was no gunk or swarf in front of the gibbs then rolled them back to inspect the bed a bit. It’s for a few nicks and scratches but I can’t see major wear, I need to get a straight edge on it.
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    Had a long chat with Castrol and after discussing the specs in the booklet (redwood viscosity 450s at 100*F which is about ISO 120) they’re recommending Hyspin AWS 100. There is also a pencil note saying DTE BB - that’s an iso 220 industrial gear oil, not sure why someone’s come up with an oil so heavy...

    Here are the oil spots on the saddle and apron. How do I know how much to put in them? Do I just keep them full? The hole nearer the tail stock has a thin bit of wire poked down it with a wick attached.

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    ah I see - being the farther of a daughter, I can relate!

    i didn’t even consider them to still Be around, I’ll give them a call but doesn’t look like they do these sort of products any more... did find the original build sheet though - 1947!

    yeah I want to bring it back to a nice state so I can be proud of it in the workshop and enjoy using it. There is quite a lot of other hits with it - about 3 other chucks (a couple of 4 jaws, I can’t really seem to get on with 3 jaws so I’ll be changing ASAP), some steadies, Jacobs chuck, gears and a heap of cutting tools. No replaceable insert ones all braze on tips. Going to need to upgrade my grinder...

    yeah very cool. But not quite as grand as that - he still owns it all I’m just living/working here. I’m managing the farm and it’s all in my care - I’ll be using the lathe for work and for my own a stuff...
     
  19. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,415
    essex england
    Here’s a Holbrook I might own. It’s older than the ops dsg yet has full Timken precision spindle bearings and camlock spindle, leadscrew reverse etc etc but it looks ancient compared to the dsg
    0D838178-FB3A-42D5-8E7E-6DFC9FF61857.jpeg
     
  20. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,598
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    A better lathe than a DSG, IMHO - the top speed will be pretty low, though - A T15 or 17 by the look of it?. My C13 is older than me, needed some work due to neglect (QCGB full of rancid old suds killed the bearings... Which are, of course, made of Unobtainium and appropriately hideously expensive) but holds tenths pretty well, buttery smooth in operation, love it :)

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
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