My Wolf Dakota 90L 14cfm 3hp compressor and dryer setup

  1. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,572
    Location:
    halifax, England
    I've posted about mine in different threads since I've got it, so now I've just done some more mods to my air system I thought I'd cover it all in a single thread.

    so this is the compressor I bought

    http://www.ukhs.tv/Dakota-14-CFM-Air-Compressor

    [​IMG]

    and my first issue with it was that I was unable to fit it under my workbench, so it got lowered 40mm,the back was easy to do, just by drillling a couple of holes

    [​IMG]

    but the front required a small frame to be welded up to take 2 wheels at the side instead of one in the middle

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    people are also fitting drain valves for the reciever that are operated on electrical timers, but I already had an old clarke air filter with automatic drain valve

    https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/clarke-cat152-14-mini-air-filter/

    so the drain valve got removed and that was loctited into bush that was then screwed into the original drain plug position

    [​IMG]

    Ive also recently changed the regulator on it as it was far too restrictive.the replacement filter is a clarke one, which is far less restrictive, but there is a small air leak between the diaphragm and lower and upper halves of the regulator body, I can live with that as its more hassle to take it back

    https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/clarke-cat865-air-regulator-with-gauge/

    here it is shown with the desiccant dryer I made earlier and now fitted with a new filter and filter regulator due to the original ones being too restrictive.

    DSC00222.JPG

    and the dryer on its own

    DSC00229.JPG

    the desiccant air dryer, uses silica gel desiccant, which absorbs moisture from the air, and changes colour as it gets wet so you know when to dry it out. (you can see this in the above picture as the beads have changed to blue at the top (wet) from brown at the bottom (dry)

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/380853696993

    and a 10" water housing filter, the one in the link below has a working pressure of 150psi, but others have working pressures of as little as 60psi, which may be an issue

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112080808285

    a copper tube is stick into the lid using car body filler, and the other end has some slots cut in it and a cap put on the end. the cap has been domed as is makes it easier to screw the filter housing lid back on

    DSC00237.JPG

    I ended up with the set up of compressor > regulator > filter > dryer > filter/regulator.

    another alternative was compressor > dryer > filter/regulator

    I could have ditched the first regulator as the filter housing has a working pressure of 150psi, which is the pressure at which the compressor turns off I have the pressure set at 100psi as the compressor turns on again when the pressure drops to 105psi. The filter is there to remove any water droplets (and possibly oil) before the air gets to the desiccant crystals. the filter/regulator is to remove any debris from the desiccant crystals and the regulate the pressure into the air line.

    I ended up getting a shako filter and filter/regulator, as they were cheapish, you can get the full specifications of them and they have automatic drain valves on them.

    http://www.shako-online-sales.com/frl/filter-regulators/filter-regulator-NUFR02-NUFR03-NUFR04

    http://www.shako-online-sales.com/frl/filter-NUF-02-NUF-03-NUF-04

    if you buy from the manufacturer you can specify the options you want, but I got them from here

    http://www.solenoid-valve.world/

    but the filter/regulator comes with a 25mm diameter gauge which is pretty useless( they dont supply them with standard 40 or 50mm gauges).

    I was pretty impressed with the build quality of these and they seem to be better than the quivalent clarke products. the bowl and cover for the filters just twist into place and the bowl is sealed with an o ring on the outside. looks like they will be easy to remove if I need to take them off again in years to come

    DSC00233.JPG

    I ended up making a new pressure gauge adaptor for the filter regulator from an offcut of aluminim. you can also fit a pressure guage to the filter on its own if you want. I also mounted the gauge horizontally so I don't have to bend down to read it when I adjusting the regulator.

    DSC00231.JPG

    inside my garage I just use normal air hoses, but for my connection on the outside of my garage I have used 10mm pvc hose and 15mm copper pipe. to join those I used

    10mm 1/4bsp hose tail > 1/4bsp socket > 8mm to 15mm plumbing compression reducer

    DSC00224.JPG

    and the outside I used

    15mm compression elbow > 15mm to 8mm reducer > pcl coupling

    DSC00226.JPG

    the reason why I've recently upgraded parts of my set up was that one of my spray guys wasn't getting enough air. even though its a Low Volume Low Pressure (LVLP) with a regulator on the spray gun the maximum pressure I could get at spraygun was 10psi with all the original mini regulators wound down to give full pressure.

    I've ditched all the regulators on the spray guns and now just use a T piece with the gauge and pcl adaptor on it (also now xf fittings to flow more air). Ive now got plenty of air for my requirements, and its easy enough to alter the pressure on the filter/regulator by the desiccant dryer.

    DSC00244.JPG

    think that me sorted for the time being until I decide to change something again, and some bits of this might be of use to someone else
     
    delta9, Dcal, dai and 5 others like this.
  2. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    8,598
    Location:
    Towcester
    Good Project

    I realy like your project posts. Always very detailed and informative with plenty of information of where you got all your materials from so anyone else can the the same

    Top stuff and good post
     
    optima21 likes this.
  3. atomant48

    atomant48 Member

    Messages:
    686
    Salisbury UK
    Brilliant post. I have been watching your developments with interest. Swapped a coil type hose for a big bore rubber one yesterday and couldn't believe the difference on my cut off tool.
     
    optima21 likes this.
  4. The Z'eer Member

    Messages:
    829
    Location:
    Essex
    I'm interested to know the results of the modifications regarding the filters and dryer. I presume these modifications are spray painting?

    I've yet to switch on my Dakota, is there a ridiculous amount of moisture in the air?

    Was there the need to have a desiccant dryer, could not a quality filter cope with the issue alone?
     
  5. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    26,369
    Location:
    yarm
    I just use a filter separator on end of tank for general use if spraying I run an other water separator near the end of the hose and use a 3meter whip hose on spraygun
     
  6. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

    Messages:
    6,659
    Location:
    Don't ask questions
    That bracket for the wheels is really nice.:D

    Reminds me I really should empty the water out of my tank, haven't done it for months.:whistle:
     
    optima21 likes this.
  7. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    26,369
    Location:
    yarm
    :laughing:haven't done any of mine in a year I must remember to have a look :)it will fill faster if there's water in :laughing:one chucks a bit of oil in so its well lubricated :ashamed:
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  8. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

    Messages:
    6,659
    Location:
    Don't ask questions
    Need to go and turn it off too, the pressure switch leaks and I'm fed up of turning it off at the fuseboard when it comes on in the night.:ashamed:
     
    brightspark likes this.
  9. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    26,369
    Location:
    yarm
    I always leave both of mine on and forget every week they refill ready for use :laughing:
     
  10. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,572
    Location:
    halifax, England
    there is a filter just before the desiccant dryer, it takes out some of the moisture but not as much as the drier takes out. the filter position does make a difference though. if its close to the compressor the compressed air is warmer so will hold more water vapour. if the filter is a distance away from the compressor like Brightspark suggests, the air likely to be cooler so the water vapour in the air will condense and is easier for a filter to remove the water condensate from the air.
     
    brightspark likes this.
  11. The Z'eer Member

    Messages:
    829
    Location:
    Essex
    ...in which case could you not have a just one filter further down the line (where the air has condensed) and do away with filter and dryer ?
     
  12. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    26,369
    Location:
    yarm
    must admit the filter on tank rarely gets water in it only the one on the end of the line so one will do
     
  13. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,572
    Location:
    halifax, England
    no because its convenient for me to have the setup how I do. I would like a fully plumbed in system using copper pipes, but that layout isn't possible in my garage without alot of work to route the pipes. This is the best compromise for my use and seems to work for me. There is not perfect answer, you need to weigh up your options and decide what is best for you
     
  14. The Z'eer Member

    Messages:
    829
    Location:
    Essex
    I'm in a similar position, I don't have the option of plumbing in copper piping. Can you confirm that with your dryer and filters there the air is without moisture completely?
     
  15. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,572
    Location:
    halifax, England
    no I can't and unless you're going to spend silly amounts of money for industrial processes, there will always be small amount of moisture in the air all you can do is try and limit the amount you have.

    you have to be realistic about what your expectations are. just remember that there is moisture in the air around us so that can potentially be absorbed into the paint you are spraying.
     
    brightspark likes this.
  16. The Z'eer Member

    Messages:
    829
    Location:
    Essex
    Maybe just a little overly paranoid but after reading the info on here regarding compressed air, and blistering in the paint I became concerned. This is all new to me, but I'd like to limit the risks of a poor result occurring as far as is financially/practically possible.

    I do appreciate yourself and everyone else sharing the knowledge, really is helpful :)
     
  17. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,572
    Location:
    halifax, England
    today I've spent in excess of 3 hours grit blasting, and at the end of it the crystals in my dryer were looking like this. the top 1/3 of the crystal were wet, the middle 1/3 were light blue and the bottom 1/3 were still brown, so its time to dry them again.

    DSC00517.JPG


    originally I did this is in an over but it was painfully slow and took about 3 hours, the problem being that if overheat the silica crystals it destroys them.

    these days I dry 1/3 of the crystal at a time by putting them in a shallow dish and drying them in a microwave at full power. I do them a minute at a time, and stir them, and it takes less than 10 minutes to do each batch. so they start off like this
    DSC00518.JPG



    you know when they are ready to use again due to the change in colour and they stop steaming when you stir them up. here is the same batch of crystals next to some unused crystals (in the round bowl). these crystals have been reused about 10 times so far

    DSC00523.JPG
     
    • DSC00517.JPG
    • DSC00518.JPG
    dai, indy4x, Pilzy and 1 other person like this.
  18. Pilzy

    Pilzy Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    Warwickshire. England.
    Great thread full of top notch info and advice.

    Thanks for sharing.
     
    indy4x and optima21 like this.
  19. pc18

    pc18 Member

    Messages:
    107
    Cumbria
    Thanks for the info i also have this compressor ive had it since April 2015 and its been great for spraying, undersealing, running 3/8" snap on gun and other tools . I was still using the original regulator but the plastic knob broke where it goes onto the knurled fitting so i was making do with a sealey air filter/regulator i was given with an old compressor and then that adjuster also broke! So i decided to give the clarke regulator you have a go.
    These guys seemed to be the cheapest from a good search.
    https://www.buildingsuppliesdirect.com/clarke-cat161-air-filter-regulator-3120175
     
  20. indy4x

    indy4x Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,410
    Location:
    Pontypool, South Wales. UK
    Have also found this thread really useful :thumbup:

    Have now acquired most if not all the bits to do this to my setup and run plastic hard lines around the garage
     
    optima21 likes this.
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