Moving a Colchester Bantam MK1

  1. xstian Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Norolk
    I'm going to pick up a Colchester Bantam on Sunday and was looking for a bit of advice on moving it.

    I have a engine hoist, trailer and a van. After looking at what others have done, I think Im going to lift the lathe and fit casters mounted to wood to the bottom of the stand. This looks like the easiest way of moving it to where I need to load it.

    I'm looking for advice on where to mount rope/chain to lift the lathe, I don't want to damage anything. Do you think it would be best to remove the stand/base or try and lift it in one.
     
  2. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    Location:
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    Dieselkid 63 likes this.
  3. MBB Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    788
    Location:
    northumberland
    There's a hole below the head stock across and under the ways for to put a bar for lifting .
    I used a 1/2" socket extension bar for lifting
     
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  4. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,256
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Hello,

    It depends if it’s a long or a short bed one. The long is 30kg heavier I seem to recall. I split mine but that was because I had to get it inside a hi-ace van! Even when lifting from the point (and with the carriage at the end, tailstock etc), it doesn’t lift even and swings about quite a bit.

    I was going to do a whole restoration anyway so it made sense to have it broken in three (bed, chip tray and stand). Note that it is rather tough to get the thing back together, you have to float the bed 10mm or so above the stand whilst you align all the bolts through the chip tray, there are also O rings below each hole which will certainly need replacing.

    If you do fit castors to wood, you’re raising the height of the lathe, and the Bantam is already a very top heavy machine. Since you have a crane (with cast metal wheels) I see no reason to do this. If you jump onto IG you’ll see Lapsleyframeworks managed to topple his and crush the seller whilst moving it - broke the guy’s leg, lathe ok. You don’t want this to happen!
     
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  5. xstian Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Norolk
    Thanks. I've got to move it about 12m over a concrete driveway. It's too far to assess before I collect so want to make sure I have what I need to move it. Any ideas what size bar I need to lift it with?
     
  6. WorkshopChris

    WorkshopChris Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,519
    Location:
    South East Essex
    A good selection of wooden blocks and bearers always come in handy, keeping slings off shafts and screws or even for sliding along to move.
    A few shackles and short slings, the purple 1-ton ones aren't a lot of money.
     
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  7. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,256
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    From memory 1/2” will suffice.
     
  8. MBB Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    788
    Location:
    northumberland
    You only need to lift the complete lathe a couple of inches to move it, I think the hole will take a bar max 3/4" I put the sing between the ways rather than the outside that ways, it cant slip off the lifting bar if its on the inside. . It would be better to take your van to the lathe than the lathe to the van. when lifting to the height to go into the van keep ahand on the lathe to stop it for swinging, I've seen a engine hoist tip over when the machine swung sideways.
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  9. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,256
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Yes they can flip especially once the machine goes, then you have no chance stopping it. This is why you need to sling things properly- I like to have less weight on the crane when I do things alone. A second person is rather valuable. I’ve felt mine nearly go once and I jacked the cylinder up like crazy to get some lift again and have it back on it’s wheels!

    The workshop we took it from had a loading bay but the bay was lower than the van and there was a metal lip for the rsd, this meant about four individual lifts, plus moving the crane through the building to the outside. We also had 30 mins to do it in - it was a bit tense...
     
  10. fizzy Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,925
    uk
    What sort of trailer is it?
     
  11. xstian Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Norolk
    It's a 1.3t flat bed.

    The lathe is in a garage, so I might get lucky and be able reverse the trailer right in next to it.

    I just want to be prepared. I've got a few 1t straps. I'll bring a few different sizes of bar to lift it. It's not easy to move thing on a hoist unless the floor is very smooth. Sometimes I'm rested thing on the hoist legs while moving them.
     
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  12. WorkshopChris

    WorkshopChris Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,519
    Location:
    South East Essex
    Always keep a suspended load as low as possible it can be the difference between a corner hitting the deck and chipping some paint, or tipping over cracking a casting and toppling an engine crance.
     
  13. xstian Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Norolk
    Thanks for everyone's advice. I'll let you know how I get on, on Sunday.
     
    Dieselkid 63, MBB and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
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