Metalworking Career?

?

Are you professionally involved in metalworking

  1. Just a hobby or necessity for my Landrover ownership

    202 vote(s)
    38.9%
  2. Professional welder/fabricator (general)

    119 vote(s)
    22.9%
  3. Professional welder/fabricator (vehicle related)

    20 vote(s)
    3.9%
  4. Machine operator/ machinest

    14 vote(s)
    2.7%
  5. Maintenance engineer

    50 vote(s)
    9.6%
  6. Retired or no longer in the industry

    25 vote(s)
    4.8%
  7. Other

    89 vote(s)
    17.1%
  1. E T Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Netherlands
    I ticked the first box because Landrovers got me into welding a long time ago.
    After all those years I now hate working on cars, I'm to old to lay on my back on the cold floor.
    But I still love welding and working with metal as long as I can stand up straight at the welding table, drill press or bandsaw.
     
    Bluemotion and stuvy like this.
  2. northwest

    northwest Member

    Messages:
    2,080
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    You need to change your customers (and probably a bit of your mind set). I say this looking in from out. I don't know who you think it is looks down upon metalworkers, fabricators or machinists but in my experience it is people who are uneducated. Or are Bankers and suchlike.

    You know what I mean.
     
    Bluemotion likes this.
  3. RTFM

    RTFM Member

    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    UK, Shrewsbury
    Oh defiantly a learning hobbyist..... got the welder last month and currently building a welding table (mig)

    once I’m done with that the misses wants some geodesic frame for the fruiting plants to grow on and an arched walkway for trees to grow up. Intending to use rebar and stick for that.

    In the long term and IF I feel my welds are good enough I may do the odd job for people but I’m thinking more bespoke hanging baskets or some weird art/sculpture stuff ???? as against anything structural/vehicle/trailer
     
    Mark 2 and Yamhon like this.
  4. Matchless

    Matchless I started with nothing, still have most of it left

    Messages:
    1,636
    Location:
    Essex UK
    another other, started as a workshop boy at 17, Hillman / Chrysler / roots dealer, Bernard Wallace in Markhouse road Walthamstow, at 18 I had my own boy, left at 19 and started out as a mobile mechanic, then found premises, was a classic BMW specialist for the last 45+ years, Cooksferry Eng, preferred classics but repaired most BMW's once they were out of warranty, retired 2 1/2 years ago, we did accident repairs on classics, mechanical, imported spares and broke a few cars, made my own car lift to the second floor, two Bradbury four posters welded together, made my own ram for that, restored a Cessna 172 when I was rich, ended up not drawing a wage for the last few years, managed to sell the building, best day ever.....
     
    Bluemotion likes this.
  5. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,984
    Location:
    NE London - UK

    Where was that, and when? I can't say that I remember them.
     
  6. Matchless

    Matchless I started with nothing, still have most of it left

    Messages:
    1,636
    Location:
    Essex UK
    early 70's heading away from the high street on the right, up from the guitar shop, opposite side from the old Nazi BMW bike specialist, they had petrol pumps, how can I remember all that, don't even remember what day it is!
     
    Seadog likes this.
  7. Matchless

    Matchless I started with nothing, still have most of it left

    Messages:
    1,636
    Location:
    Essex UK
    And Bernard used to live in the Ridgway Chingford, backing onto Ridgway park, my father was chairman of the model engineering club for a while, the 3 1/2",5", and 71/4" railway is still in the park as far as I know,
     
    a111r and Seadog like this.
  8. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,984
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    Markhouse Motorcycles owned by Frank Cox. I never went near the place: A) because he was very anti anything not German B) his reputation as a an out and out Nazi (swastikas etc. in the back of the shop, also rumoured to have been one of Moseley's cronies).

    Very much like Dougie Clarke over Bounds Green way.

    I still can't remember the garage though. But then, it was 50 years ago :rolleyes:
     
  9. RWD3M

    RWD3M Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,166
    Location:
    Wiltshire, UK
    I can't believe I hadn't responded to this earlier.

    I selected 'other' because I'm primarily a hobbyist now but did work for an Automobile Refinishing company for 15 years or so mainly doing panel and chassis work.

    I got into welding at school where I was taught to gas weld at the age of about 11 or 12. Seadog knows the school, Warwick Junior High. I couldn't do sport for a year or so, so I got to go to the metalwork shop every PE lesson. Happy days!

    Richard.
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  10. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,984
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    I know Warwick very well, I lived in Barrett Road between 1951 and 1983.

    It's still there but the "Manual Instruction Centre" is now artist's workshop. It's now called Woodside Primary Academy :vsad:
     
    RWD3M likes this.
  11. docwelder

    docwelder New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    nyc & port charlotte fl
    i'm recently retired after 46 yrs in the welding game. the last thirty years i was a welder for the city of new york working for the department of corrections on rikers island. at doc i made a lot of prison style gates,bar sections welded steam lines and fabricated/repaired things for the laundry and kitchen. mostly stick welding but used a portable 110v wire feed machine that used nr 211 innershield to eliminate the bulky gas cylinder. before corrections i welded for a waterproofing company mostly off hanging wire rope scaffolds repairing rusted out beams and columns. this is a hero shot of your's truly building outside rec pens on the rock. P4100066.JPG P4100066.JPG
     
    daleyd, MBB, Cheesie and 5 others like this.
  12. Cheesie Member

    Messages:
    224
    Location:
    Lisburn
    I wouldn't call myself a professional welder/fabricator, I've been more out on site for the last 15 years, I did my codes in 6g for stick and tig a long time ago, to tell the truth I've laid some awful welds and some ones to be proud of in that time,

    Recently I've turned to thoughts of going it alone as I've had enough of working with people and for people, slowly gathering in my own equipment
     
    steve t likes this.
  13. Robbie260 Member

    Messages:
    1,194
    Location:
    Scotland highland
    I have voted maintenance engineer as although others on here have voted otherwise id say it best fits marine engineer, though i could also have selected the land rover category, can do machine operator/machinist to a reasonable standard, and general welding and fabrication all learned through my cadetship.

    To be honest i think what best describes us is the biggest jack of all trades anyone will ever find. I do mechanical, electrical, welding/fab work, machining, plumbing, joinery, tileing, domsetic appliances, hvac, fitting and a million other things all at work on a daily enough basis.
     
    Lewis_RX8 likes this.
  14. MBB Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,127
    Location:
    northumberland
    I was a toolmaker before I retired. I never worked in a toolroom that employed a welder or had a welding machine.
     
  15. Robert.

    Robert. Member

    Messages:
    174
    Location:
    South East
    Ex marine engineer and underwater spanner monkey ...now do the same skill set on land but now instead of big boats its big diggers etc . Coded welder , diesel Fitter ,.CSCS machine operator ... spend more time on the phone and doing paperwork these days , but keeps my codes up to date and my boots on my feet ...still show em young uns how to properly swing a sledge hammer at a pin !!!
     
    Robbie260, Lewis_RX8 and Seadog like this.
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