lidl bench drill

  1. Kram

    Kram Member

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Sussex
  2. winchman

    winchman Member

    Messages:
    3,071
    Location:
    Merseyside
    You do get what you pay for but its better than no drill and cheap, I had a similar one and it was very useful until I found a Startrite for about £100.
    Personally if you have the room buy it and have two when you finally get a better one, one polisher one drill, or at £60 when you have finished with it you should sell it on for £30-40.
     
  3. willie.macleod

    willie.macleod Member

    Messages:
    43
    Location:
    Western Isles, Scotland
    I've just bought one but won't have it in my possession for a bit. I know the fundamental problems of these wee bench top drills, use Meddings pillar drills at work but to be honest what attracted me to this one was:

    1) Easy to change the speed without faffing around with the belts - being honest, how many of us adjust the speed regularly to suit the bit? Less excuse with electronic control to get the correct speed and save excessive drill bit wear and worse

    2) Workholding - this looks to have a better workholding facility than my current model, from the v groove for pipe to the hold down clamp, this looks sensible if perhaps a blatant Bosch copy.

    3) Power - this is over 700w compared the current Chinese thing I have in the container which although it has done what it says in the tin is only 350w.

    I might change it over to keyless chuck for convenience.
     
    jerrytug likes this.
  4. colnerov

    colnerov Member

    Messages:
    3,265
    Location:
    Nr Gatwick UK
    As used by Guy Martin?

    317142_06.jpg
     
  5. duncans Member

    Messages:
    75
    Location:
    leicester
    one good thing you get 3years guarantee with the drill which is sound
     
    Hopefuldave likes this.
  6. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,508
    Location:
    Moray
    I think I'm going to get one. My mill drill is set up for milling and I don't want to swap it about. I do have the need to drill a reasonably accurate* hole once in a while.

    *By my standards.
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  7. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    That does look remarkably like him. :)
     
  8. Kram

    Kram Member

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Sussex
    Their previous ones appeared to be belt drive ac motors and much more ridgid for the same price? This appears more like a preassembled universal motor mains drill on a flimsy drill stand? Its only 8kg total. Im going to skip this one.
    However I did buy the air sand blast kit for 9 quid. Doubt its much good but cheap enough not to care. I think one bottle of grit costs more on ebay and this has two (also useful as furnace hot face coating if I ever do another attempt)
     
    Hopefuldave, Dr.Al and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
  9. Kram

    Kram Member

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Sussex
  10. Rig Pig

    Rig Pig Member

    Messages:
    3,563
    Location:
    Narrwich! U.K.
    It looks horrible, plastic and flimsy. A cheap metal one has to be a better bet even a Chinese metal one has to be better than that!
     
  11. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,508
    Location:
    Moray
    So I saw one in the shop and agree, decided not to buy.
     
    winchman likes this.
  12. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,771
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    i bought one today.
    its not too bad, to be honest.
    its a "model makers" not an "engineer's" drill: should be perfectly ok for pcbs, plastic, timber and light alloy.
    wont be running many 16mm holes in 8mm plate, though.
     
    MattF, slim_boy_fat and Kram like this.
  13. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,016
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Did debate one for the van. Perfect for woodwork and occasionally have need
     
    bigegg likes this.
  14. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,771
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    i'm not sure how well it would survive professional use, or loaded in and out of a van.
     
  15. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,508
    Location:
    Moray
    Depends what you mean by professional use...
     
  16. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,016
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Indeed
    I need the odd true hole in boards when making floating shelves. Maybe set up for drilling hinge holes in cab doors.
    Nothing industrious.
    Looking at Bosch's offering.
     
    bigegg likes this.
  17. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,771
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    it would work extremely well for 35mm cabinet door hinge recesses.
    its one of the main uses i'm planning for mine.
    although the depth stop is a bit... *meh*
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  18. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,508
    Location:
    Moray
    Thing is, I've heard it said that this tool or that tool is no good for industrial or professional use. Often that means being totally abused by people with no clue how to either use or look after tools.

    Nothing will stand up to repeated abuse and poor handling for long.
     
    MattF, bigegg and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
  19. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,016
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Yup.

    I have a Titan thicknesser/planer.
    Perfect for sizing the odd bits o need and don't have room for anything bigger. Besides I can Chuck it in the van and bring it to site.
    Wouldn't expect to fire timbers through it day after day but it's not designed for it.

    Bought a more expensive one last year. It failed on its first use so returned it and bought another Titan
     
    bigegg likes this.
  20. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,771
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    i'll stand by my comment:
    suitable for modelmaking (or possibly lab) use.
    i don't believe it is suitable for an engineering environment.


    i dont think it will stand up to being loaded and unloaded from a van constantly.
    i think that, in a workshop or with *careful* site use, it would work perfectly well to drill eurohinge recesses.
    if you were planning to use it to drill out for mortises, maybe not.

    this is based on assembling it. my opinion may change when i use it!
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
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