Got a Smartmig 162.

  1. Jlg

    Jlg Member

    Messages:
    2,289
    Location:
    Cumbria
    That looks good
     
  2. Richard.

    Richard. Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    18,350
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Thanks :)
     
    Jlg likes this.
  3. Instructor_Nige Member

    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    manchester
    This all started because you stated that if the OP is weaving then his settings are all wrong and not enough heat" rightly or wrongly I pointed out this this is not strictly true because weaving techniques are a valid and important technique in welding. regardless of whether you like to weave or not does not make it invalid. But to answer your question...

    Firstly the OP is welding what looks like 3mm plate, this is not really suitable for spray transfer, second he is using a small 160 amp machine, also not designed for spray transfer. Now I know you didn't actually mention spray transfer at first but your advice on settings did point that way and your subsequent posts have indicated that where ever possible spray transfer is the way to go.. This is not what I would advise and this is why (this is my opinion only) not saying you are wrong.. ok maybe just a little..

    Spray transfer is hotter and has deeper penetration and is faster than dip transfer welding (or short circuit welding if you prefer the American terminology) but like all techniques it has its applications and its disadvantages. You need a machine capable of spray transfer to start with, it produces a much larger heat affected area which means potentially more distortion especially on thinner materials and it is generally unsuitable for any position other than horizontal, (although it can produce very nice overhead welds in the right conditions).

    Dip transfer is cooler, has less penetration and is slower, however, it is multi directional, has a much smaller heat affected area, creates less distortion and is capable of welding very thin materials. But to get the very best out of dip transfer it requires a good technique to manipulate the weld pool, i.e weaving.. there are many different techniques for weaving from simple Cs to circles, triangles, push and pull.. and these techniques, all well documented in text books videos etc etc have their own pro's and con's. The technique I prefer, just in case you are interested, and the one i used in the example i posted is backwards Js

    So why would I weave, well because that is how to get the very best out of dip transfer. So weaving does not mean your settings are wrong it is just one of the welding techniques available and in the case of the OPs post the method i would advice to get the best out of his 160a machine on 3mm material.

    Nige
     
  4. bigfellayork

    bigfellayork Member

    Messages:
    223
    Location:
    York UK
    Well I haven’t a scooby about spray transfer ( apart from the grandson pissing on my carpet when his nappy is off).
    The welder it seems ain’t going to be up to task at 160a.
    Think I’ll just stick with the stick.
    I wrongly assumed it would be ok up to 4mm
     
    dobbslc likes this.
  5. bigfellayork

    bigfellayork Member

    Messages:
    223
    Location:
    York UK
    Thanks to all for hints and advice apologies from me if the debate has caused any hassle.
     
  6. Instructor_Nige Member

    Messages:
    25
    Location:
    manchester
    no hassle just healthy debate
    beats watch big brother on telly :)
     
  7. Richard.

    Richard. Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    18,350
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Yes it is. To spray doesn’t mean you need 300 amps. Spray transfer is achievable by voltage.
    The heat input can be reduced by welding hotter nige. It’s about travel speed. Heat input, distortion can go down using higher settings and picking up the pace
    Dip transfer has its place but 3mm in the flat isn’t one of them. See my pic above. The thinner gage bottom plate. That’s 3mm. If I messed about in dip that’s just asking for LOF problems. Dip transfer coupled up with weaving increases heat input and increases distortion not reducing it mate.
    Agree with this fully.
    Simply not true.
    The haz could be bigger the heat input certainly could be higher. Remember AXV/T=j. It really depends on how much ground you cover. If your weaving in dip transfer on 3mm steel your going at a snails pace. I’d be quicker with tig.
    No chance. Again heat input locally will see to that.
    If your in dip transfer on the right gage for dip transfer you simply don’t need to weave in the flat position. If your having to weave to get things to blend and wet out your not set up right. I’ve never had to do this. If my hand is forced to weave I’ll turn things up so that I can get the smooth transition I need and crack on to get the joint done. I can still be in dip transfer and apply a little more voltage to wet out. I’m not messing around in one place wiggling the wire around.
    Imo it’s not a great weld for that gage of steel. Looks lacking power. As a welding inspector I’d have it cut and etched and probably find it’s hardly bitten.
    See all above. It’s how to polish a turd. It can look good but it comes with a long list of negatives that I don’t think your aware of.
    160 amps on tap with a 0.8 good wire and mix gas he should be able to nicely join 3mm without weaving. If he’s forced to weave on a particular gage and can’t go up in power to do straight runs then the unit simply isn’t capable of properly welding that gage. I stand by that nige. I’ve been doing this long enough.
     
  8. north Member

    Messages:
    44
    Location:
    Sweden
    To weave or not to weave sounds like shakespiere :drunk: . Something must be wrong with your smartmig. It can not be the shielding gas. Have you set the maschine for welding with gas because it is a gas no gas welding mashine... At 160a it should do much better...Must be people here what have the same stuff and certanly can show you good welds... I have two Telwin Machines one old that goes to 120a and it performs better than your Pictures... :sheep::sheep: The second one is a synergig welder with scale for co2...3mm no problem. :welder: If smartmig was so crap no one will buy it.
     
  9. dobbslc

    dobbslc Member

    Messages:
    5,382
    Location:
    Hertfordshire UK
    I've got the easy mig 140 and it did a very decent job with a bit of 5mm plate when I tested it at the welding shop before I bought it. Not sure whats going on with yours, do you know someone that can weld that will test it for you?
    Maybe try a mix gas rather than straght co2. :thumbup:
     
  10. Richard.

    Richard. Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    18,350
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    You sure? I’ve recently just bought a 200 amp machine and it needs all of that 200 amps to properly bite into 5mm.
    I can’t imagine 140 amp would do much on that sort of gage.
     
  11. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    :clapping:
     
Advertisements