Gate post in driveway question

  1. Martin870 Member

    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Lancashire England
    I'm after some advice on fitting heavy gates in a driveway.

    I understand that some gates would be fine fixing the hinge to the original brick post but for heavier gates that need a steel post or drives with poor built or crumbling brick post what's the best way to dig out someone's drive to concrete the post in?

    The way I think is right (correct me if I'm wrong) cut a square out the tarmac/concrete using a Stihl saw or grinder with s diamond disc, break the surface material with a sds and chisel bit then dig the hole with a post spade, drop the post in followed by concrete?

    Am i right?

    Thanks in advance
     
    brightspark likes this.
  2. CornishPete Member

    Messages:
    403
    Location:
    Huddersfield
    Pretty much. The bigger the gate, the bigger the post, the bigger the hole! All depends on the gate.
     
  3. Martin870 Member

    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Lancashire England
    Thanks mate, just wanted to clear it up
     
  4. stuvy Member

    Exactly that

    An sds big hole, then some gravel water and post mix and level the post abs your away
     
  5. Arc Tourist

    Arc Tourist Member

    Messages:
    832
    Location:
    California & Wales
    Before you dig, establish where the gas, water, and or other utility lines are.
     
    indy4x, johnik, Kent and 8 others like this.
  6. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    7,762
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    A deeper, narrower hole gives better support than a shallower wider one. That's from experience of pulling the ******* out. If you want it pretty, sink your post in and build the brick around it. Stand the hinges off on a couple of heavy flat bar brackets welded to the post and reaching out through the mortar joints.
     
  7. Wildefalcon Member

    Messages:
    151
    Location:
    Gloucestershire, England
    Think of the gate as a lever. The post has to be a better lever, or the gate will sag.
     
  8. Martin870 Member

    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Lancashire England
    As far as im aware it's 1 ft deep for every meter above the surface, so if I need a gate post 2 meters high I'd cut it to 2600mm and concrete 600mm in the ground

    As for utilities under ground I'm not likely to dig holes more than 3ft deep, I'm not likely to reach anything this shallow am I?
     
  9. Martin870 Member

    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Lancashire England
    Good idea, I suppose this would be for customers who want a big fancy heavy gate but want brick posts. This would be an expensive job for the customer because I'd have to employ a bricky for the a day or 2
     
    stuvy likes this.
  10. 8ob

    8ob Member

    Messages:
    3,380
    Location:
    moscow on thames
    If you are intending to hang big gates on any piers it’s worth the time/effort to dig across the drive and drop a steel in the ground which gets welded to the steels in the pier. This will stop the piers pulling into each other over time and screwing with the gate alignment whether just a steel post or if it’s bricked around.

    Bob
     
    hunter27, Brad93, Rig Pig and 5 others like this.
  11. CornishPete Member

    Messages:
    403
    Location:
    Huddersfield
    For a 2m gatepost you definitely need more than 600mm below ground unless the ground is exceptionally hard. As a rule of thumb a fencepost needs about a third of the visible length of the post below ground eg an 8' post would have 2' below ground and 6' above ground.
    A gatepost has a lot more weight put on it plus if it moves just a small amount it may not close! I'd put at least a third of the gatepost below ground i.e. 1m below ground 2m above, but it really does depend on just how heavy the gate is and how hard the ground is.
     
  12. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,446
    Location:
    london
    When you say concrete....do you mean postcrete?

    I would say buy a proper gate post...don't cheap out like "someone" I know who bought 100mm steel square section and then the blooming thing deflects... even with a 5mm-6mm wall thickness :doh:
     
    stuvy likes this.
  13. Migmac

    Migmac Member

    Messages:
    2,868
    Location:
    Kintyre. Scotland
    I have a 12ft field gate at the side of my house, tubular metal. Not the heaviest gate. I dug the gate post in, 9ft strainer, half out half in. No concrete involved, what came out the hole went back in. Well tamped in. Gate is still level 14 years on
     
    Justme and stuvy like this.
  14. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,446
    Location:
    london
    This is one I did with my mate....that gate is bloomin heavy....definitely stopped my fly tipping problem.

    I think that post was a 4 bagger (postcrete) but the alley ground was rock hard....you want the right spade to dig the hole too...should be a nice neat hole....not 1 foot wide at the bottom and 3 for wide at the top!

    https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/project-2-nissan-figaro.74791/page-3
     
  15. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    9,897
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    A post should be built off a club foot foundation with rebar backfilled with concreate going up tgrough the core of the post.
    Its far from uncommon for brick and solid stone posts to snap or move under what you might see as a light to medium gate if it was any real span
    Having had existing posts snap i can attest to getting a good disclaimer signed up front.

    If it looks suspect i fit new steel post and ignore the existing, walk away or have a frank conversation and get that disclaimer. Otherwise your down a gate and end up paying for a post - you broke!

    Remember if it falls and hurts someone it can lead to prosecution so don't treat this lightly
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  16. Anguz Member

    Messages:
    327
    bedfordshire
    Services in driveways can be a lot less than 3foot down
     
    hunter27, Brad93, indy4x and 3 others like this.
  17. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,030
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Indeed. All the mishaps ive had wih services theyve been shallow and in unexpected places.
     
    Brad93 and stuvy like this.
  18. RichardM Member

    Jockey wheel?
     
  19. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    9,897
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    Hardly any drives are level.
     
  20. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    9,897
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    Absolutely
     
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