Frame rail straightening....this way?

  1. Myles1970

    Myles1970 Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Monaghan, Ireland
    Came across on my YT feed....I have a fair bit of crushed frame rails to tackle in the future, and it looks like an alternative to drilling them out straightening them off-chassis, and welding them back on.
    Am a bit sceptical about stretching (and hence weakening) them though

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    I lost interest in the video when he started hitting a planishing hammer with club hammer. :vsad:
     
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  3. daedalusminos Member

    Messages:
    1,076
    Location:
    Norwich
    Th frame rail he beat the hell out was virtually a uniform U section - so easy to just cut off and fabricate a new one
     
  4. Myles1970

    Myles1970 Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Monaghan, Ireland
    @Wallace :laughing: yes I noticed that too.... But it's on youtube so it must be right :D
     
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  5. gordon stephenson

    gordon stephenson Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    7,019
    Location:
    Skelton in Cleveland U.K.
    Always a big no no, Striking hammer faces together, One of the first things bought when I was an apprentice!!
     
  6. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    We were told not to at school, worst thing the teacher could have done! :laughing:

    My bad, they're bodywork hammers so being put to their correct use working on the body of a vehicle to get a workout! :laughing:
     
  7. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    31,750
    Location:
    yarm stockton on tees
    yep the faces are hard and can easily shell off and injure you:vsad:
     
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  8. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    2,520
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    think id have cut the bottom off and made a new one , all down to how well the spots stood the abuse , then how well the floor welds back in , wonder what the VBRA view on that method would be , Im guessing the damage wasnt recorded and the insurance company were not involved , probably an insurance write off .
     
  9. Will! Member

    Messages:
    98
    Location:
    Derby - England
    I'd always considered my battered frame rails a badge of honour.
     
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  10. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    2,520
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    ive still a scar on my left arm I got when I was about 12 putting a handle on an axe , the hammer I was knocking one of the two metal wedges in with , after the wooden one hit the axe head , which shouldnt have had a high temper at that point but did , splitting off a small shard and it sliced my arm on the way past , it bled for ages , never again have I let that happen. But out of curiosity Myth Busters did a thing on it to see what they could get to happen hitting hammers with hammers , from memory not a whole lot happened , Im sure its on you tube some where.
     
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  11. tigdlo Member

    Messages:
    88
    Location:
    UK
    cutting into a perfectly good floor to staighten out an easily fabricated part makes no sense. now he has a crappy floor and crappy frame rail...
     
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  12. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    2,520
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
     
  13. Will! Member

    Messages:
    98
    Location:
    Derby - England
    18 months later - How to replace sections of floor pan.

    Actually, I just went on his channel, he's cut the rails out now anyway and replaced them with RHS.
     
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  14. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    What vehicle is it? I saw Salem on the lower door.
     
  15. Will! Member

    Messages:
    98
    Location:
    Derby - England
    The title says 1999 Saleen which google suggests is a S281 or S351 (engine dependent)

    It's basically a late 90's Ford Mustang.

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    I was expecting a 4x4 with those frame rails! :clapping:
     
  17. Will! Member

    Messages:
    98
    Location:
    Derby - England
    My MX5 rails are worse, has a speed bump shaped indent behind each front wheel where it landed. Then what looks like crispy bacon surface profile as it juddered along the length of them. I thought about replacing them but they aren't rusty at all, which means they're at the bottom of the list.

    I'll make sure to cut the floor pan open and hit them with RHS and 2x4 instead.
     
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  18. Myles1970

    Myles1970 Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Monaghan, Ireland
    Apprenticeships? Didn't they disappear with professional standards? :whistle:
    ....tho what am I saying, I'm the one watching videos on YouTube looking for tips:laughing:...at least I have some engineering training from BT
     
  19. Will! Member

    Messages:
    98
    Location:
    Derby - England
    You'd be surprised what you can learn by watching Youtube fabricators, but then you have to wade through hours of gratuitous TIG weave, rainbow oxide film and stacked dimes to find someone who actually tells you something useful.
     
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  20. gordon stephenson

    gordon stephenson Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    7,019
    Location:
    Skelton in Cleveland U.K.
    I finished my five apprenticeship in 1965, As a fitter and turner, Great place to train at the Dorman Long steel works, Very dirty and noisy and very old fashioned equipment, But they didn't buy any spares, Every thing was made in-house, Blacksmiths shop had about ten steam hammers, All shafts of all sizes were forged in to shape then turned to size, All gear wheels were hobbed and flame hardened, Plain bearings both brass and white metal were cast and machined, Reall enjoyed, When the only safety was to hang a wooded "danger" board on the switch gear, with no fuses pulled,Some did get killed over the years, people thinking the job was finished, remove the board and switch on. It happened to a chap i worked with while he worked on a overhead trod wheels,
     
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