First (real) project, needs some help

  1. RedmervanD

    RedmervanD Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Apeldoorn, the Netherlands
    Hi everyone,

    A while ago I bought my first new welding machine, an HBM 200CI Synergic welder. Goes from 30 - 200 AMP, can also do stick and TIG. Of course I started with MIG, so far we are getting along fine. Did some horseshoe porject, but now its time for a proper project.

    I'm going to build a welding cart for the machine, bottle and a crate or 2.
    Bought some angle iron, 30*30*3 mm, and some caster wheels.

    Currently I'm using a 0.8mm wire, but with this type of iron, I'm having a bit of a hard time. The penetration is not optimal I think. Even in high settings I've got the feeling I'm struggling. My welds do stick, but they are a bit high

    Question is would a 1.0 mm wire do better at the thickness of this metal?
    Or should I move slower?

    (forgot to take some pics to show...)
     
  2. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Hi & welcome to the forum :waving:

    You'll need to give more information about what settings you're using with the machine - 0.8 should be fine with the metal you're using.

    As an aside, do a forum search for a thread about carts members have built - there are lots of excellent ideas there to be incorporated in yours.

    EDIT: Found the thread for you https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/show-us-your-welding-cart-trolley.54651/ :thumbup:
     
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  3. RedmervanD

    RedmervanD Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Apeldoorn, the Netherlands
    Thanks for the tip, I had found it earlier already. Got some ideas from the carts shown by others :-)

    I'm planning on a cart with 1 shelf for the welder, and a bottom ofcourse which will hold some boxes and the bottle.
    As I said earlier, making it out of angle iron.

    I've got the shelf finished, and I have to say it is pretty square for a first time. I expected more difficulties with getting the angles square, and getting it nice and 'flat'
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Started these welds with these settings, and went max to 150, and a 0.8mm wire
    [​IMG]

    Any suggestions?
    Am I to fast or to slow?

    By the way, I'm struggling with cutting mitres for the bottom with an angle grinder, any suggestions for that perhaps?
     
  4. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    The forum tutorials [green buttons at top of home page ^^] are pretty good for getting you started, iirc as a rough guide 30Amp for every 1mm- see here https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/tutorial.htm

    For the mitres [in the absence of a mitre saw], practise with a 1mm cutting disc in the grinder and a steady hand would be my suggestion. It's something I find tricky sometimes due to compromised vision in one eye. GOOD light is essential......:)
     
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  5. Craig-SM

    Craig-SM Member

    Messages:
    881
    Location:
    Leeds
    I’m no expert and can only pass on bits of info passed onto to me. Chamfer the edges of the metal to be welded to get better penetration. Use mitre cuts create your 90 degree corners, less cutting and welding, will look neater too.
     
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  6. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,705
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    to me theres not enough fusion with the metal some of those welds appear blobby

    i also get the instinct your staying a little too long before you move on across the weld

    you can weld the way you have as long as you mitre them but a pointer an old wood saw has 45 and 90 degrees on it

    irwin saws have 90° & 45° ANGLES Integrated into handle for easy marking out
     
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  7. RedmervanD

    RedmervanD Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Apeldoorn, the Netherlands
    Firstly thanks for your replies and suggestions! Really appreciate it!:thumbup:

    I think I have to get some scraps together and get the setting right. But 30amps per mm will not work on this, been there done that... (without succes)

    But when reading and watching the tutorials, my welds don’t look that different. But I have the feeling that there is not enough penetration. The back of the metal is hardly ‘changed’.
    That’s why I tried going slower.

    About the actual fabricating;
    For the bottom ‘shelf’ I’m trying the mitre cuts again. Unfortunately my angle grinder stand is hard to adjust correctly and can’t cut the angle iron fully. So I have to do a bit by hand which messes up the cut when I finish it by hand or grinder. But bought a new bigger saw, so hopefully things improve.
    This saw has also a 45 and 90 degree angle to use as Gaz1 mentioned.
     
  8. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,705
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    ok then a bit of advice with grinder cutting turn it so the angle iron is facing away from you

    the flat is facing you and the top L away from you in a vice mark it out and cut from the top getting your angle as you head into the flat part

    not so sure after that cut the top at the angle required cut straight down on the flat plate then its grindig it
     
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  9. angellonewolf

    angellonewolf Member

    Messages:
    5,344
    Location:
    bristol england
    clean the metal and the return lead point ?
     
  10. Spot the welders dog

    Spot the welders dog Member

    Messages:
    512
    Location:
    smoggy town
    As above: Starting with cleaned metal is a good routine to adopt early on when you are starting out. My preference are for linishing discs because they clean without removing too much stock. A piece of emery paper wrapped around a block of wood is a better than nothing :)

    Mine is a dumb welder with push buttons so can't help you there - but it looks like you blew through in one spot so power could be ok'ish and its the technique that needs more practice.
    I do seem to recall that leaving a 'root gap' is often mentioned, although I think once you have burnt away some more hours with the welder things will start to fall into place.
     
  11. RedmervanD

    RedmervanD Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Apeldoorn, the Netherlands
    In the mean time I continued with my cart.
    Tonight I realised I got more and more familiair with the machine, and my welds actually start to look better, to my opinion at least...

    The results so far;
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The diagonal is probablya bit to long and should have gone more to the front (left on the last pic)
    And I haven't done any constructional calculations of any kind ;-)
    I assume the bottle on the back (right) is heavy enough to keep it with its wheels on the ground.

    Speaking of wheels, any suggestions on welding the galvanized wheels to the cart?
     
  12. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,705
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    try to avoid welding galvaised if you can we normally shove steel bar through or bolts or wheels
     
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  13. RedmervanD

    RedmervanD Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Apeldoorn, the Netherlands
    I know welding galvanised is bad for your health, but I have them laying around...
    Could try and make a plate where I bolt the wheels on, and weld that on. Gives me the possibility to exchange or renew them when necessary
     
  14. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    That's how I work, no drawings etc - it seems to work for me. :laughing:

    I have to weld outside [I've a wooden shed] and soon got tired of dragging the cart + 2 x bottles to the door. I had designed it to take both pure Argon and Argoshield Light Y size bottles. :rolleyes:

    I now have them chained to the wall and just use longer gas pipes for the supply. ;)
     
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  15. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    2,743
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    This is a good way of doing it I think. Makes it a lot easier to move the welder around and you don't really gain much by having the bottle mounted on the trolley as you are restricted by the length of the power cable anyway
     
  16. Mattycoops43 Member

    Messages:
    108
    Location:
    Newport, South Wales
    I weld galvanised all the time, because i mostly work on boat trailers, they are obviously gavanised at manufacture, but it's a bit rubbish to weld new bits on that are't galvanised, they rust instantly. I just make sure I grind enough of the galv off where I am welding, so that it is far enough away from the weld to not vaporise and give off gas. It's surprising how little you need to do. I usually find about 25-30mm clean metal is enough so I don't have any issue. I also weld in the doorway of my workshop to be safe.

    I'm always on the lookout for good clean galvanised scrap trailers, it's surprising how often they turn up! :D

    Matt
     
  17. RedmervanD

    RedmervanD Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Apeldoorn, the Netherlands
    So, got a bit further this week :-)
    Almost finished, only need some material for the bottoms.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  18. Dutch Welder Member

    Messages:
    266
    Location:
    Oss, The Netherlands
    Welds look ok, but those casters are going to fail relatively quickly I am afraid.
     
  19. RedmervanD

    RedmervanD Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Apeldoorn, the Netherlands
    Why would that be? Because they are only connected on 3/4 of the surface?
    They should be able to hold 75kg each, enough for a welder, a bottle and some tools
     
  20. Dutch Welder Member

    Messages:
    266
    Location:
    Oss, The Netherlands
    I could be mistaken about the size, but I thought they are 40mm wheels, and they mostly come with a 25 kilo weight limit per pair.
    That could be quite low for the rear ones, as they carry the full weight of the bottle.

    But with them being able to take 75 kilo's they will last.
     
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