Cutting down and relocating my fab table

  1. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    898
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Sometime ago I took ownership of a very large ~9' long welding/fabrication table. Due to the size and weight of it, it lived outside. I had planned to learn to weld on this table, and go onto using it to fabricate things for myself, friends and family. Best laid plans and all that; I spent much of my time renovating it, removing loads of weld building up from the previous owners, treating the rust and painting it. By the time I got around to cleaning the surface of the table up my tarp failed and the wouldn't protect my table anymore.

    A combination of factors have meant that I've probably used the table more to rest things on and cut firewood on rather than learn to weld with it. Normally when I'm free the weather is awful or the dog and family are busy so I can't use the table where it was located, on the drive.

    To get more use out of it, I decided to cut it down and relocate the smaller table into the garage. This Saturday I was planning on cutting the table down to about 1/3 of its original size from the leftward end, in such a manner that I would then have a clean edge and two existing legs already in place.

    Removing the tarps and my wood and metal I had stored underneath today, I was reminded that the frame of the table lends itself to being cut in half, which would be around 4.5' square rather than down to 1/3 of its original size. As there is no longer a car in the garage at the moment, and this being only a temporary table until I build one from scratch, I felt I'd take advantage of the frame and more space and "just cut it in half".

    TLDR; my fab table is now square, half its original size and is relocated inside the garage.

    The starting off point. This photo was taken on a much warmer day, earlier in the year.
    Fab_Table_Painted.jpg

    Inpatient as ever, I made a start today, rather than waiting for Saturdays better weather. Got sick of waiting for the rain to stop long enough to flap disc the frame to weld on leg extensions in the middle... with a degree of difficulty, we used my platform trolley and got the full table inside the garage out of the rain.

    20191220_144349.jpg

    I was just about to begin welding some leg extensions on the center legs, which as designed don't touch the ground, when a friend suggested it might be easier to cut the table down first, so the welding can be done in a more comfortable position.

    20191220_152748.jpg

    So out came my Clarke Contractor and the new 115mm diamond cut off wheel from Lenox. I used a piece of old bed frame clamped to the table to help keep the cut as straight as possible.

    20191220_155723.jpg

    The 115mm cut of wheel seemed to be working fine; sadly my grinder wasn't... first smoke and then flames coming out of the casing meant a more suitable tool was needed. Luckily a friend borrowed me one of these. Go big or go home :-)

    20191220_163137.jpg

    It was still hard going, and it wasn't easy handling such a heavy tool all the way across the cut.

    20191220_185413.jpg

    Here is where things had to be left for one day, the table is cut in half and left on end ready for new leg extensions welding into place. The legs from the remainder of the table were cut down leaving the rest of the 5mm plate on the floor of the garage in the background.
     
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  2. Domdom Member

    Messages:
    57
    Location:
    UK, Warwickshire
    Nice project. Something on my list as well but I wasnt aware that steel could be cut with a diamond blade. Learn something every day.
     
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  3. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    898
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    I think these are designed for metal, the smaller for the 115mm grinder is at least; which was a Lenox brand from Machine Mart. Not sure what was on the larger machine, I just used what was on it already.
     
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  4. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    @Yamhon Did you cut it down the middle? In your position I think I would have divided it into a 5' and 4' table.
     
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  5. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    898
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Yes; I opted to cut it down just to the right of the vertical supports on the frame you can see in the middle of the table in the first pic above. Did it that way to keep modifications to a minimum as I only have a bit of disposable gas left, and have very little in the way of suitable material that I could make up a new frame out of. I have loads of 8mm flat bar and the like, but 8mm is a bit out of the league of my 151TE machine.

    The cut down table is a hair over 123cm down one side from the left most edge to where I cut. Can't recall what the other dimension is, as I didn't measure that today, but it looks close to square.

    Even cut in half the table is very very heavy, I'm not all that strong, so dangerously so for me to move alone. Luckily I had some help today. At least parts of the frame is a lot stronger than I previously thought, I had assumed it was made up of 3mm angle, but it looks to be at least 5mm angle with some thicker sections and the plate is 5mm thick.

    I'm open to ideas what to do with the other 4'x4' piece from the top. If I can't come up with anything to do with it, I had planned to cut it down into small sections for me to practice welding on, although I think 3mm is more of a suitable size for my MIG machine, at 5mm I may waste a lot of time on a low duty cycle.
     
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  6. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Send it to me [before the rest get in......:laughing:] :scared: :D
     
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  7. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    898
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    You'd be welcome to it... it's not in great shape, but steel is steel to a degree I suppose; wonder how much its worth at scrap price.

    Logistics might be a problem with you living in the Highlands mind!
     
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  8. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    898
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Looking forward to filling the holes in and polishing the top, came up nice last time before my tarp failed and got stuck to it lol.
     
  9. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    2,675
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    Reminds me of when I cut some 10mm plate with a 4.5" grinder!
     
  10. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Indeed they would. :(. Appreciate the offer though :hug:
     
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  11. Memmeddu

    Memmeddu Member

    Messages:
    1,501
    Location:
    Italia Sardegna
    Concrete cutting blade on the grinder , strange auxiliary handle thought
    Back to the bench you should make some legs for the other half and make them modular so if you need you can joint them together
     
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  12. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    9,602
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Screenshot_20191223-001148.png
     
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  13. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    898
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Both blades; the Lenox on my 115mm grinder and the big blade of whatever brand that was seemed to work really well.

    There does seem to be a skill to cutting with these, a skill I haven't quite mastered yet. There were times where the blade would cut easily and other times where it would lunge forward or dig deep or just struggle to cut. I kept trying to replicate what I was doing when it cut the easiest but it got harder as my arms got tired. It seemed to me that holding the machine with the bulk of its weight above the cut and the teeth of the blade chewing threw the face rather than pushing down threw the metal seemed to make the quickest work of the job.
     
  14. Memmeddu

    Memmeddu Member

    Messages:
    1,501
    Location:
    Italia Sardegna
    I think that diamond blades should not be used to cut through steel with a grinder.
    We use them a lot to cut concrete with an without rebars,and vibrations are crazy...
    I never used one on just steel but I know that steel is harder to cut than concrete .
    I will still use abrasive wheels for the grinders
     
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  15. Memmeddu

    Memmeddu Member

    Messages:
    1,501
    Location:
    Italia Sardegna
    Yes I know them , never used but I think that vibrations will be crazy same thing about noise
     
  16. Shedendman

    Shedendman Member

    Messages:
    3,683
    east sussex
    After looking at a few reviews on Utube last night,i'm giving them a miss
     
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  17. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    9,976
    Location:
    Towcester
    I found these too on the Internet.

    I go to very many factories particularly metal bashing places.

    Never ever come across these. I always ask about cutting discs as they are a big feature in the propagation of noise and vibration.

    We have a big campaign starting soon in metal fab. Will look out for these
     
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  18. Yamhon

    Yamhon Member

    Messages:
    898
    Location:
    Yorkshire, UK
    Vibrations were about comparable to a chainsaw ime. Very loud, but you should be wearing hearing protection with an angle grinder anyway imo. I don't think abrasive blades would be very practical with what I had to cut, I'd expect to have to change the blades too often, but generally I have no problem with abrasive cut off wheels, there what I normally use in the 115mm grinder.
     
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  19. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    9,976
    Location:
    Towcester
    Really are you serious?

    Chainsaws produce the most vibration going. An angle grinder irrespective of any type of disc will be no where close to to the vibration of a chainsaw.
     
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  20. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,559
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Diamond blades dislike cutting steel, as I've found over 30 years of concrete cutting with them. The blade periphery get so hot that the diamonds break down and lose their cutting edges. Then the blade starts to 'hammer' in the cut which is the cause of the heavy vibration. In extreme cases the segments start to melt and they even go out of round.

    I suspect that the 'metal cutting' discs are simply made with a softer bonding matrix so that they erode more quickly thus exposing fresh diamonds. Either way I think they're a poor substitute for a decent carbon blade.
     
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