Car body splatters....

  1. SIP-Free

    SIP-Free Member

    Messages:
    991
    Location:
    Dan Saff!
    Looks like you have a natural ability there mate, you obviously understand how the material acts, how to visualise the development and how to manipulate it.
     
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  2. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    It's one thing that I've always been good at is visualising how things go together. It's like having an exploded diagram in my head. I pick mechanical stuff up quickly. I'm the kind of person who struggles to figure out how to do stuff with paper and textbooks and it makes no sense, but let me look at it and play with it, or let me see you doing it and it seems to make perfect sense. That's why I'm definitely not the type of person to have a career behind a desk....lol.
     
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  3. Burdekin

    Burdekin Chief Bodger

    Messages:
    4,820
    Location:
    Aberdeen
    As Sip-free said.

    When making tricky repairs I'd recommend to make the repair over size to give you a but if wiggle room to adjust it. And depending on the repair, sometimes it's best to leave the original metal in place until you've made the repair. But you're doing great and certainly not afraid to give it a bash which is the best way to learn.
     
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  4. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Yeah, I think it's just force of habit as part of my day job is making patches and infills for skin repairs. Most of the time we have to cut away all the bad metal and traces of corrosion first before a repair is designed as they can cost thousands every time. There's nothing that drives the engineering department up the wall more than designing a repair then coming back and having to change it because you found another bad bit and all the measurements are off, so our holes and gaps are already there and we have to adjust the already oversize panels or patches to make them fit....which they never do. Unfortunately I don't get the opportunity to weld any parts or make up complex shaped parts, the metal shop and welders do that. We do make a lot of parts but they're usually relatively flat or only have slight compound radii. If we start going in to the territory of doing other folks jobs they get a bit upset so we have to stick to our own thing...sadly...
     
  5. james butler

    james butler Member

    Messages:
    1,251
    Location:
    birmingham england
    this wouldnt happen to be a repair on a saab would it?
     
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  6. ms08

    ms08 Member

    Messages:
    556
    Location:
    Kent
    I thought that but don't think it is - looks like the familiar driveshaft tunnel repair. :whistle:
     
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  7. daedalusminos Member

    Messages:
    716
    Location:
    Norwich
    Some really good fabrication work there. You can make an edge tipping tool from bar stock with a slit cut in to the depth of the flange.

    Don't forget to change that brake line in the wheel arch.
     
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  8. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Ha, you noticed the brake pipe?? Yeah, I got a bit carried away with the flap disc and took a chunk out of it. Lol. It's not a SAAB it's actually a Mk3 Astra Estate. It's the osf wheel arch with the wing removed. Its the hole where the steering arm comes through the inner wing. Absolutely full of rot. Getting there now though, did another patch repair today and it went really well. The C02 and solid wire is like night and day.
     
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  9. tinker jim Member

    Messages:
    207
    Location:
    birminham
    You'll never go back to flux cored wire for body repairs once you've tried gas argon co2 is even sweeter to use. some nice fab skills you using on this car keep the photos coming:thumbup:
     
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  10. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Some of my efforts today. 20180113_161800.jpg 20180113_161811.jpg 20180113_162911.jpg 20180113_175156.jpg 20180113_182416.jpg 20180113_183913.jpg looks slightly better than it was....
    I'l definitely not be going back to the flux cored wire. So much easier to weld and so much less mess...
     
  11. james butler

    james butler Member

    Messages:
    1,251
    Location:
    birmingham england
    good work so far :welder::thumbup:
    i knew it was vauxhall family somehow :laughing:
    keep up the good work, like wise i started off using gasless wire and didnt realise how much it sucked untill i was introduced to co2.
     
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  12. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    It may end up being part SAAB if I get round to an engine conversion, but that's a long way off just now. I'l be quite happy when it's not got any crusty bits and has a full new paint job.
    Definitely staying with the gas. I tried the flux cored to save a bit of money on bottles. To be honest, it's so much less hassle with gas that it's worth the extra money.
     
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  13. SIP-Free

    SIP-Free Member

    Messages:
    991
    Location:
    Dan Saff!
    You're not using the little bottles are you?
     
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  14. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Yeah, for the moment. I was going to try and get one of the bigger green ones which are better value but can't justify the monthly rental of a big one. I've got an empty full size bottle but I don't know of anywhere that'll fill it without charging for a monthly rental fee.
     
  15. wookie Member

    Messages:
    2,597
    Location:
    .
    I just use a pub size Co2 bottle, I currently rent one from a beer gas supplier, previously I got one from a fire protection company, compared to the rental for proper welding gas pub Co2 is cheap.
     
  16. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Hmm? That's a thought. I didn't know you could do that. What about a regulator??
     
  17. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,705
    Location:
    halifax, England
    you can get a new regulator for less than the price of 2 disposable bottles
     
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  18. wookie Member

    Messages:
    2,597
    Location:
    .
    Either the place you get the bottle from will sell you a Reg or any decent welding supply company will, all you need is a Reg that fits the bottle, I've always used a 2 stage Reg as they are a far better design than a single. Preferably get a Reg with 2 gauges so you not only know what pressure is left in the bottle (so you don't run out mid job) but can easily set the flow to suit (saves gas)
     
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  19. tinker jim Member

    Messages:
    207
    Location:
    birminham
    I have used co2 fire extinguisher before with great success when stuck just take the horn of the extinguisher off and pop a co2 reg on and away you go lasts way longer than a mini bottle (10 minutes of welding time at best).you planing on doing the saab red top engine switch a roo lol good for 350 bhp with miner mods was going to do something similar to the wife's meriva then relized what a waste of time the meriva is but that' another story.
     
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  20. SIP-Free

    SIP-Free Member

    Messages:
    991
    Location:
    Dan Saff!
    Google Adams gas and Hobby gas for rent free.
    The ones you're using now give you about 7 minutes of gas. They are horrendously expensive on a car resto! The BOC Volkzone deal is about a fiver a month rental and 40 quid to fill. Well worth considering if you have a crusty Vauxhall!
     
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