Car body splatters....

  1. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    81
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    I've only recently started welding and to date it's only been box section. My welds I'd say looked reasonably sensible so I thought I'd try something a little more challening....and a bit thinner. I'm currently restoring a car and decided to tackle the welding myself. It was a bit hit and miss at first, some of the welds weren't too great and when they were solid they were still a bit messy. I wondered if it was because I was welding with flux cored gasless wire. I tried my hand on the wings and obviously the welds had to be tidier and invisible as you could see this area. I think the welds turned out OK, but they took forever and I had a lot of issues with burn through and pinholes. It only really started to work out when I used a copper heatsink. I've now changed to normal wire and C02 but not tried it yet. Any tips and pointers to get decent penetration without blowing through?? 20171216_172620.jpg 20171216_205145.jpg
     
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  2. optima21 Forum Supporter

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    halifax, England
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  3. Wallace

    Wallace Member

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    7,169
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    You will find Co2 much better than fluxed core on sheet metal, Argon mix better again. Welding near those magnets will affect the arc and give you porous welds that look like you have no shielding gas.
     
  4. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

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    81
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Ah, that I never knew about the magnets. I had no idea....
     
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  5. Wallace

    Wallace Member

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    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Welding, it’s a learning curve! :D
     
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  6. Tim Waters

    Tim Waters New Member

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    3
    Location:
    UK - East Midlands
    Hi, your efforts look good, agree with everything Wallace has said.

    Just keep trying out with scrap metal of the same thickness, practice practice practice!
    Argon mix with non flux wire will get best results..... start off with welder at lowest setting ( dependent on welder ) and increase till you get best results.
    If you can get down to 20 amps you should be ok
     
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  7. SIP-Free

    SIP-Free Member

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    991
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    Dan Saff!
    Practice, absolutely no substitute.
    Keep experimenting on the thickness and type of scrap you're going to do it on for real, once you get the right setting record it and practice some more, do this each time you start a new panel and for me at least weld very short runs, spots even rather than the whole run in one shot.
    Practice using more power than you need and running quicker, I've found this useful and better than low power, slow runs for car panels but that's my own preference.
     
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  8. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    81
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Had another crack at stitch welding the inner wing this morning with the normal wire and c02....
    It looks a bit more like the result I think I'm after.....
    Thoughts??? 20180110_150041.jpg
     
  9. SIP-Free

    SIP-Free Member

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    991
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    Dan Saff!
    I'd be happy with that for panel work, what's it look like underneath?
     
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  10. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

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    81
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Much the same but the welds aren't quite as raised as they are on the outside.....
     
  11. SIP-Free

    SIP-Free Member

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    991
    Location:
    Dan Saff!
    .....sounds like it's a good weld, make a note of the settings and keep on practising :thumbup:

    Use the magnets just for lining the weld up, put a few tacks in to hold it together firmly then take them off and put them out of the way so they don't pick up all the dust from the grinding!
     
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  12. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    81
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    Aww good. I'm finally getting somewhere then by the looks of it. I reckon the flux wire must've been a bit fierce as this seemed so much easier. 20171231_222707.jpg The weld ground down nicely and there were no lumps or pinholes like the last time. I made up a repair patch and welded it in. Not overly pretty but it seems rock solid and nobody will see this under the primer and stonechip. 20180107_160006.jpg
     
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  13. wookie Member

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    Don't put yourself down I've seen a hell of a lot worse pass for welding on cars.
     
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  14. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,169
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Did you make a repair panel, cut a section from another car or cut the rusty bits out and repair them then weld back in? :confused: I can't tell! :laughing:
     
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  15. Sean Another 602 fan

    Messages:
    1,295
    Edinburgh
    better than that its pretty darn good!

    Youve found the using copper as a backer/heat sink tip? also start on the edge and give it a few mm. if you try to finish on an edge it just burns away as it soaked up the heat.
     
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  16. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    81
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    20171230_172211.jpg
    Thanks guys. I'm starting to feel a wee bit better about my work now. The repair panel I made myself. I cut from an old locker shelf. I cut the rust out and made a card template of the infill, trimmed and bent it to shape. The lip around the hole was made by cutting a pre folded edge that was already formed on the old shelf. I cut along the radius and used it as a guide to grind it down straight as possible and kept the pre cut edge to the outside. I tacked the strip to the edge of the panel and used a small hammer and pliers to bend the strip in to shape and follow the contours of the panel edge, then stitch welded along the length nof the strip to make it rigid. A lot of grinding with a flap disc and some hand filing finished it off.
     
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  17. wookie Member

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    Ah, good old CAD (cardboard assisted design ;) )

    For that lip you could have just added the height of the lip to the cutout and then bent it up a little at a time with an adjustable spanner by keep working your way from one end to the other, a little dressing with a hammer and you'd have a really neat lip that looked factory.

    Doing that on an concave curve is easier than a convex one as you are stretching the metal rather than trying to shrink it but I've done it with a lip as big as 1/2"
     
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  18. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    81
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    I had though about making it bigger and bending it but wasn't sure if I'd be able to keep the panel close enough to the right shape if I did that. It's the first time I've ever tackled car body work and never welded anything with curved shapes that wasn't heavy box section with perfectly straight cuts and joints. All these tricks of the trade will come in handy though. It means I have more options to rely on if I get stuck. Keep the tips coming, I think I'll need all the help I can get as this car has a lot of welding to do...lol.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
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  19. Burdekin

    Burdekin Chief Bodger

    Messages:
    5,130
    Location:
    Aberdeen
    You're doing well and doesn't look like you need much advice especially when this stuff normally looks better in the flesh than in the pics. I think the trick with car stuff is being inventive like you're doing. The first idea might not work out so you have to think of another way to make something but quite often the simplest way is often the best. As Wookie said you can tweak up an edge like that with pliers or adjustable spanner etc and then finish off the edge with a hammer and dolly. (Kennedy's panel beating hammers and dollies from Cromwell Tools are decent for the price if looking for some.) That's how I did the repair for this hole for a petrol tank pipe and lip for the seal.

    Keep the pics coming.

    Picture 208.jpg Picture 216.jpg
     
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  20. Matt Thomson

    Matt Thomson Member

    Messages:
    81
    Location:
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    I'm not quite there with the hand beaten stuff quite yet....lol. That tank repair looks like it was stamped out. Not a wiggle or hammer mark in sight. I'll hopefully get there eventually. That's why I'm trying to do most of the stuff you won't see first and get better with that before i do the bits I can't cover with sealer....
    I actually had a go at building a bumper bracket and it came out amazing (after all the splatters were ground off) so I thought I was winning but then it all seemed to go downhill after that, hence coming on here for advice. Here's the bracket I made which I was quite proud of.....
    20171120_232409.jpg 20171120_225234.jpg 20171120_231908.jpg
    To be fair, there wasn't a lot of welding in this one, mostly bending and hammering. The curved section and a small tab on the other side was all that was needed welded to strengthen it as it was made from one piece of metal.
     
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