Bent Saxo vts

?

What to do

  1. Burn it

  2. Scrap it

  3. Repair it

Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. LewisT Member

    Messages:
    129
    central scotland
    Bought this car as a run around a good number of years ago while another car was off the road, six months dodgy mot later the car was put in the garage to fix some of its wrongs where it has sat ever since.

    The car is a cat c and with all the panels on its hard to see anything wrong with it but on closer inspection its had a bit of a chop at the front and patched together with another saxo.

    Outlined in red is donor car.

    [​IMG]

    The main problem with the repair is the part of the chassis leg on the near side that was replaced. The end of the chassis leg is a few centimetres higher than it should be and also it is 10mm or so short. The effect of this is the fan opening in the front of the car is trapezium shaped the fans don't fit and just hung forward in the space behind the from bumper and the bottom head light bracket wasn't bolted in.

    Pictures of the chassis leg OS nice and unmolested.

    [​IMG]

    Chassis leg NS not so great.

    [​IMG]

    From the front.

    [​IMG]

    Cross member on the NS its mangled at this end i had initially planned on remaking the end and slightly lowering it to allow the fan to fit properly but it started to annoy me that i am just introducing another bodge. Also the cross member is about the only part that replacements are available for.

    [​IMG]

    So this is where the saxo sits at present and now i am calling on the collective wisdom of the forum on how to put it rightish its already got a cat c on the log book so its never going to be concourse i just want to drive it and have it a little less bent.

    There are already a few saxos and 106's in this section would anyone be able to share a few measurements that can aid me particularly the distance between the chassis legs.
     
    stuvy likes this.
  2. CompoSimmonite Member

    Messages:
    4,440
    Location:
    Werrington, Stoke-on-Trent
    Buy another with a good, unmolested shell, and swap the VTS parts over
     
    Brad93, slim_boy_fat and stuvy like this.
  3. sg66 Member

    Messages:
    544
    Location:
    northeast
    Is it really worth the effort.
     
  4. mr haynes Member

    Messages:
    594
    Location:
    Scotland
    I'd imagine there wouldn't be many around with most having binned up a tree etc
     
    Westfield-builder likes this.
  5. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    Have you googled repair panels?

    alternatively find a rear ended car either a track car or on the forums and swap the bits to yours

    or cut your losses and scrap it and sell the engine

    there only a grand on eBay which I’m surprised about
     
  6. northwest

    northwest Member

    Messages:
    1,490
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    Actually, most of the work is done. Now it is just a bit of fabricating and welding then the engine back in. I would guess that the engine and box stayed in the car when it was "fixed" so no matter what you do it's going to be better.

    Get it parallel to the floor and use that as your reference. It's just a bit of graft and you will be good. If you want "original" parts, do as suggested above, find a rear ended one and liberate the front from it.
     
  7. garethp Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    996
    sw scotland
    Personally I'd scrap it as I've done the same years ago with a proper mini that I bent on an icy road. Looking back I could have put the same time and money into something more worthwhile as I ended up spending more than the car was worth.

    Apart from being a fun drive yours wont ever be worth much since its registered as a cat c.

    If you really want to do the work (and there's nothing wrong with that) you'd be better off working on a car that hasnt been registered as damaged.
     
    Parm likes this.
  8. LewisT Member

    Messages:
    129
    central scotland
    I suspect this is what happened first time round hence why they cut the damaged chassis leg just in front of the engine mount.

    About ten years ago you could buy entire front quarters for repairs nothing now not even pattern parts.

    I have tried to do this but the car is up on two different pairs of axle stands front to back so its just off level i probably could get it level with some planks

    My first idea was to get another and strip for parts, but no allowed to cut another car up on the drive :laughing: secondly up in scotland saxos are, difficult to find, aint cheap, usually rotten in these exact areas.

    Yellow line is where it has been welded, red line how it should be and the blue line how it actually is.

    [​IMG]

    Apart from the bent front the rest of the car is clean and straight, some of the restorations i have seen have replaced way more metal than this repair will need.
     
  9. Al Strachan

    Al Strachan Not Funny

    Messages:
    255
    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    A french hot hatch with all of the issues of the earlier cars with none of the Kudos.
     
  10. Nomad Member

    Messages:
    545
    Location:
    North Devon (for how long?)
    If you decide to scrap it let me know, when I left the uk I gave my saxo to a mate and he is stripping it to rebuild as a fun project. He might be interested in yours to make 1 good from the 2 cars.
     
    stuvy likes this.
  11. hermetic

    hermetic Member

    Messages:
    135
    Yorkshire UK
    You need to be able to pull that chassis leg downwards, so you need to create a fixed point under the car that you can attach a ratchet strap to and pull the leg down. What I am talking about is a mock up of a blackhawk eurodozer, which I used way back! If it is only 10mm out it should move that much with ease. People used to use a bit of rsj concreted into the floor as a strong point to pull against. How about three or four scaff poles, ratchet strapped together, put under the damaged side front to rear, chain the poles to the chassis at the rear, place a block under the chassis at the front, just rear of the area you want it to bend in, then attach a ratchet strap betwixt poles and car at the front, and put some pressure on it, then panel beat with hammer and dolly on the damaged area, increasing the tension as you go. You will need to overbend it somewhat, but you want it to spring back to the right position. Slowly and gently. and be careful not to bend the back end!! A very old friend of mine, who sadly died recently started like this in a two bay garage, which I wired for him . that two bay garage is still there, but now is lost in the centre of one of the norths largest accident repair shops!
    Phil
    East Yorkshire
     
  12. bricol Member

    Messages:
    1,088
    N.Yorks, UK
    If you know the difference, just use suitable spacers, put it back together, and enjoy thrashing it.
     
    Wallace likes this.
  13. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,704
    Location:
    london
    I did the chassis legs on my mr2 a few years ago (after it was written off while parked on my drive!!!!)....what I did was find a car that was being broken for bits and just cut the front off and use that instead. Because the part I got was perfect it had the cross member on which made the alignment a lot easier. I actually took it apart and used what I needed....but it really helped a lot. You might be able to fix what you have...if you can take some good measurements from a good car to check yours...

    To get everything perfectly straight I bought a magnetic laser pointer (cheap as chips)....set it on the various faces and then make a little template in front of the laser.....then move it along the panel. That worked really well....the other tool I used was a laser distance measure....accurate to 0.1mm...very handy to take references to the bulkhead to make sure the new front was perfectly aligned.

    I did mine for fun....as I bought the scrap back for peanuts it didn't cost much except for my time.

    Here is a link...
    https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/mr2-mk2-sill-repair-cheap-panel.40615/page-10
     
    stuvy likes this.
  14. wacky7791

    wacky7791 Member

    Messages:
    168
    Location:
    SEQ australia
    I'd have said scrap it a few years ago but these things were very popular for a generation of insurance crippled young lads so reckon t hey'll eventually become a bit of a sought after classic, never really been my thing so not sure what the 'scene' is like for these?

    as for the repair if the legs are straight up to the repair point can't you cut it off and refit it in its proper position? if its ahead of all the suspension and engine mounting points its not doing much more than holding light bits on and keeping the legs spaced anyway.
     
  15. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,093
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Don’t overthink it, make some better repairs than have already been done then drive it into the ground.
     
    northwest likes this.
  16. northwest

    northwest Member

    Messages:
    1,490
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    This would work though I have used the RSJ method in the past.a couple of anchors in he floor and ratchet straps, just make sure you are high enough off the ground to get some tension on.

    This is an excellent idea. I had forgotten just how cheap this laser stuff has become.
     
  17. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    8,519
    Location:
    Essex
    Buy a standard Saxo some old dear has done 50k mile in and swap the parts over.

    Or like the fiestas. Buy a Mk5 Ghia made in Cologne as the shells were much better made and swap the ZS parts over.
     
    CompoSimmonite and stuvy like this.
  18. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    After the original post I went on eBay, find a low mileage one for less money than a VTS or VTR, there the same money
     
    Brad93 likes this.
Advertisements