0.6 or 0.8 that is the question

  1. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    8,623
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Haven't used any .8 yet.
    .6 has done everything I need and welds beautifully at higher amps too.
    Mostly sub 3mm though
     
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  2. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,895
    Location:
    london
    When every i've tried it on the Kemppi the end burns back to the tip and then jams the feed....happened half a dozen times and that was me done.

    With 0.8 it never happens!

    I really wanted to use 0.6 as I was welding a jap car from the 1990s which is really thin....fresh steel is 0.7mm maybe so any corrosion and it becomes very difficult. Fortunately the Kemppi is really good on low power...but I thought 0.6 would make it even better.

    So maybe the conclusion is 0.6mm is great for thin steel provided the welder can handle it....still could be operator error (maybe I should read the manual)
     
  3. Shedendman

    Shedendman Member

    Messages:
    3,558
    east sussex
    I thought the Kemppi had a burn back control,if so can it not be adjusted to suit?
     
  4. mechman Member

    Messages:
    1,658
    Location:
    great britain n.e.lincs
    I gave up on 0.6 very early on with my welder (migatronic 180 auto) put some good welds out on car stuff but was sick of the nests inside of the machine. Been using 0.8 since no probs.
     
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  5. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,895
    Location:
    london
    Yea maybe....but that would mean me reading the manual.

    Think I just got used to 0.8....the machine loves the stuff and it never gives any problems at all....literally zero problems. I may give it another go on the next project...all I got was burn back....or worse a big nest of wires wrapped round the feeder rollers. It might be that I've just gotten lazy with the torch positioning....if I stretched the torch out that might help?
     
    mechman likes this.
  6. ranchero Member

    Messages:
    79
    Location:
    southampton
    .8 for everything tried .6 just could not get it to feed correctly made lots of rats nests and ended up binning best part of a 15k roll of wire.
     
  7. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    8,623
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Recon that says more about the wire feeder than the wire itself
     
    WorkshopChris likes this.
  8. gordon stephenson

    gordon stephenson Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,414
    Location:
    Skelton in Cleveland U.K.
    I have used 0.6mm wire with a Kemppi 180 mig, no problem at all welding up to 3mm steel. Only ever use EWM or Lincoln wire, For the small difference in price its worth every penny.
     
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  9. WorkshopChris Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,365
    Location:
    South East Essex
    I have had various wire problems in the past with generic white box or bulk wire, in all diameters. Now it's Lincoln every time for MS Wire or Esab for special wires depending on specifications.
     
  10. premmington

    premmington Member

    Messages:
    1,238
    Location:
    Norfolk
    0.6mm A18 wire - 100% CO2 - in my Miller set for patching up cars.


    I have tried 0.8mm in Argoshield 5%.


    I much prefer pure C02 and 0.6mm for patching up rusty cars...
     
  11. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,195
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    Are you swapping over the drive roller to the smaller groove for the thinner wire?
     
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  12. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,195
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    I bought some white box wire from Lidl & it welded beautifully, should have bought more & it's never been for sale since then. :vsad: We are limited on what we can get around here, usually sealey or super 6 which can be hit & miss quality wise. I buy a few rolls of Lincoln when I'm in the BOC shop, unfortunately that's an hour's drive away. :(
     
  13. Bbe555 Member

    Messages:
    137
    Location:
    Lancashire
    I use .8 on everything and can weld down to 0.8mm mild no issues really. Short bursts do the trick
     
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  14. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    5,173
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    I used to use .8 for everything on my last machine 180 amp....tried .6 it was horrid.

    Now swap between .8 and 1.0 depending what Im doing, though its not often I drop down, unless its a biggish job.
     
  15. chris y Member

    Messages:
    236
    Durham England
    I think 0.6 is better for thin material.

    However, if you imagine pushing the wire, it has much less column strength so is more likely to bend and buckle if everything isnt in good condition. It also has more room in the liner.
    I think its important to have your consumables like liner roller and tip in good condition, and not have any tight bends in the torch cable while welding, you need to think about where to put the machine to keep the cable straightish.
     
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  16. Bone of Arc

    Bone of Arc Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    0.6mm on thin sheet or car body type material and anything above and up to about 8mm I use 0.8mm. I have 15kg rolls of each loaded into different Migs so I go to the one appropriate for the job.
     
  17. Daz1968 Member

    Messages:
    532
    Uk
    I used 0.6 on my mini project after using 0.8 for previous project, i found it easier for butt welding 0.8mm material.
    I use an mb15 torch 3m and have a short gap between roller and liner, also have tension set so it slips rather than bird nests if anything goes wrong. Never had my major issues using either size though. I have always found the quality of weld and ability to weld thin material is reliant on the quality of the wire feed.
     
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