You're probably gonna laugh...

  1. happy jack Member

    Messages:
    12
    Worcester
    ...but I've been practising with my new MIG for an hour or so for past three nights and thought it was coming on OK. I'm using the gas (CO2) bottle supplied and hence it has no guage. Thought I'd check if there was any still in by putting upside down in water. Turned tap to 3 as advised on instructions - nothing. Turned up to 5 and audible hiss and BUBBLES!!. Thing is, I've never had it past 3 whilst welding and never heard it hiss before (didn't know it should!). Is it safe to say all my practise has been gasless? If so - is burn through and brown powdering no surprise?
    Please don't use the phrase 'common sense'!!
     
  2. jolly_roger187

    jolly_roger187 Member

    Messages:
    93
    Nottingham
    LOL.... (sorry for laughing!) I did the exact same thing mate, i dident know the differance at first. It had me thinking...... Is gas a neiccessaty?
    I just forgot to turn the bottle on, There did seem to be alot more uncontollable splatter however, but the weld dident seem too bad! :lol:
     
  3. happy jack Member

    Messages:
    12
    Worcester
    JR - it does seem obvious when you suss it, but like you I haven't seen a big problem with the welds more than you'd expect from a beginner. I was hoping for some miracle cure to my let's say - less than perfect results! Anyway - give a go properly tomorrow and see what happens. At least I know how to tell when it's run out - I was wondering how you did that!
     
  4. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,129
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    Oops! Actually you can still stick bits of metal together without the gas, but the weld tends to end up full of holes and isn't very strong at all. Try grinding it down and you'll find there's nothing there.

    Aluminium without gas is even worse - it vaporises and leaves you with a big hole in the metal (don't want to run out when doing anything important)!

    You'll probably see your welds improving with the gas turned on. Much easier. :D
     
  5. happy jack Member

    Messages:
    12
    Worcester
    Yes - tried it tonight - clearly better. I've also turned the power up a notch now my 'travel control' has improved and I'm getting 'the sizzle' with the wire on 6 and a bit. This feels right to me - bit like when you know you've hit a cricket ball just right - just a case of keeping it in a straight line now! I plan to send some shots once I think I'm doing OK and would appreciate your opinion. The disappointment when I'm back to square one will crush me!!
     
  6. dave_w11 Member

    Messages:
    3
    Hello!

    My welder arrived today, and I found myself welding without gas for a while. It seems silly now to have gone so long without gas, but I had put it down to my poor welding that I had loads of spatter and spongy looking welds.

    I thought I was using argon/co2 mix. I had screwed on the regulator and set it to between 3 and 4 as recommended in the manual as a good starting point. My welds started to get a bit better ignoring the spongyness and huge amount of spatter, so I started to wonder a bit about the gas setting. When I eventually got to the point where I could hear some gas coming out I managed to make a couple of beads that were a bit less embarrasing! Unfortunately I had run out of metal to practice on after those 2, so I'll have to wait until the morning to do some more.

    With the 3 argon/co2 bottles I bought, no gas comes out until I've turned the nob on the regulator all the way round and back to 0. I can't get it to turn past 2 then because the nob presses against bottom bit of the regulator. With the co2 bottle that came with the welder the gas starts coming out at around 5 like happyjack's.

    Have they sent me a dodgy regulator or is there something I could have done wrong in setting it up? I'm trying to decide whether to bother trying to get it replaced, or just carry on with this one.
     
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