Wire feed too fast?

  1. elobire New Member

    Messages:
    14
    UK, wales
    Hi all,
    I'm trying to weld some thin 0.8mm bodywork sheet with my Wolf 140 (with argon/co2) and i'm having issues. It welds fine at higher power settings but on 1 or 2 it welds ok for a second and then stutters and burns back a bit.

    I was reading this could be wire feed too slow but turning it up just makes it worse. I've also measured the wire speed and i'm getting about 2.5m per minute on the lowest setting, which seems high compared to the 1.6m I see on the calculator page?
    https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/calculator.htm

    Any ideas what could be causing this? I understand the welder isn't exactly the best on the market and I'm considering just buying a Clarke 151en so I can stop worrying about the limitations of the welder. I've got a fair amount of welding to do on my car :laughing:
     
  2. Robert Mullins Member

    Messages:
    109
    Location:
    Salisbury, uk
    Get yourself a piece of scrap, or an off-cut of light gauge steel similar to what your wanting to weld, use a head screen, set the welding plant to the lowest volts setting, turn the wire speed to maximum and weld using one hand, with your free hand turn the wire speed down AS you are welding
    It may be advisable for me to mention that you get a hold of the wire speed control knob before you start welding,
    I'll mention as well, that with light gauge work, too high a wire speed can tend to push the arc through the metal, the lower wire speed allows the arc t form at the top of the weld pool,
    With thin sections, you can utilise the "make & break" technique, very simply, iniate the arc just long enough, to deposit a weld pool sized globule of metal, and stop, wait for the material to cool fractionally , only seconds, and repeat the procedure, ensuring that all of the weld pools burn into the adjacent one: if the steel burns away, wait a tad longer to allow it cool more:
    Keep at it, you will get there
     
    tom2207 likes this.
  3. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    2,501
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    I was welding a very old very thin bulkhead this morn , it was mostly stitched and even then i was using a wet rag as a backer as I couldnt get in with a lump of copper ,, the point im making is that car body work is not quarter inch plate , you may not always get runs of amazing looking beads ,,, be prepared to experiment . and watch your gas flow too , I run very very little gas flows on these jobs , maybe 4lpm but work in a draught free environment to be able to do that.
     
    metalmelt likes this.
  4. Sean Another 602 fan

    Messages:
    1,328
    Edinburgh
    What he says ^. Make some copper backing spoons from some copper pipe bat it flat, polish it and shape it so you can get in the back of the weld.
    Im not familiar with the Wolf but its a basic machine with possibly not terribly low power settings ...forget trying to run a bead, nice flat full penetration tacks every inch or so stop cool repeat.
     
  5. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,697
    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    I spent several months building a hot rod out of a rotted old car body, with a newbie mig welders fixation that I needed high wire speed to get the ‘bacon frying’ sound.

    Brain lock, it was, but eventually I tried experimenting with it, running lower wire speed etc, and discovered a whole new world of welding. A mig welder can be a wonderful thing on thin bodywork. :D
     
    mike os, Sean and dyno-tron like this.
  6. Sean Another 602 fan

    Messages:
    1,328
    Edinburgh
    "Bacon frying" and " cursive e or a u shaped weave"

    Aint never going to hapen on 0.6 pitted steel!
     
  7. elobire New Member

    Messages:
    14
    UK, wales
    Thanks guys I think it's probably just me expecting thin metal to weld the same as thicker stuff and needing to practice more. it does weld a quick tack fairly well which is what I was planning on doing anyway. I'll give the copper pipe a try too.
     
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