Wide front wheels/tyres, ride on mower

  1. W.olly

    W.olly Member

    Messages:
    1,855
    Location:
    Radcliffe, Manchester
    Well then a bit if a project for my boat mooring.

    I am looming at getting a ride on mower. Around £300 - £500 so thought in what to get beside my idea.

    The mooring is a field along side a canal which gets very wet,muddy,boggy even when it rains a few days.

    Now it has a good size plot along with my other boat a few boats down and i though why not get a ride on mower as we park the car at the top then have to walk down about 500yards to the boat.

    Aswell as getting to the boat it would be to mow the plots and drag a small trailer down with supplies to the project boat.

    First off what are the widest front wheels/tyres i can fit before modding the wheels to gain tread width to prevent sicking in as much whislt i can still use it to mow the moorings with out chaning the wheels /tyres.

    Thanks

    Admiral Faffer
     
  2. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,049
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    If you are buying a mower you'll need a bigger budget! Anything in the £300-£500 range will need some repairs, the deck will likely need patching or replacement.

    I would suggest around £700 is a more realistic budget for something decent. Mowers over 36" tend to be cheaper as they will not fit through a standard garden gate.

    One that will mulch the grass would be better for you as it will leave the mower lighter (no grassbox).

    As for tyres, the standard fit tyres are squeezed onto the rims so I doubt if you can fit a wider tyre. You could band the rims to make them wider but the increased width will give the steering linkage a hard time & you could bend something.

    TBH I've never heard of problems of a ride-on getting stuck & it's pretty wet around here! You could fit tractor grip tyres on the rear if they are available in your size, they come fitted on the larger commercial mowers.
     
  3. jpmillermatic

    jpmillermatic Member

    Messages:
    726
    USA-NY
    Ive seen a second set of tires bolted to the first set....but that makes steering a bit weird...I have also seen "4 wheeler" or "quad" tires used on garden tractors. garden tractor trailers or carts can be had for little money used or at a tag or rummage sale. If you can find in your local for sale listings a yard sale or something similar, you may find a good one in that price range. Turbo does have a point though.

    things to watch for...rot through in the mower deck. low compression in the motor, busted transmission. other than that, tractors like this are easy to work on!

    ...and kinda fun....

    JP
     
  4. W.olly

    W.olly Member

    Messages:
    1,855
    Location:
    Radcliffe, Manchester
    Sorry late back een busy on the boats.

    So i mite aswell stick with the standard wheels and tyres. No problem as don't want to mess modding them yet


    How hard a job then is it to remove the decks as i hear its a common thing to fail.

    From what i see of them its just corrosion, if so cant be that hard to fix either weld or GRP repair ?

    Arr parts expensive as i can manage to repair myself.

    Thanks guys

    Off again to wire up rhe elecy start on the outboard
     
  5. jpmillermatic

    jpmillermatic Member

    Messages:
    726
    USA-NY
    You may get lucky and find one in good shape, not too old, with little to no rust for 500.00 or so. Though the older ones from the 70s and 80s are more robust. Here in the states, we had Craftsman, Yard Machines, Bolens, Simplicity, Wheel Horse, John Deere, Cub Cadet, ect. Not sure what you guys have there....but through the 70s, 80s, and into the 90s, John Deere & Cub Cadet made their own very rugged machines. Craftsman, Yard Machines and others were all made by MTD, (who later bought out Cub Cadet and Wheel Horse).

    The motors were usually Kohler, Briggs and Stratton, or on larger machines, diesel.

    A yard machine, cub, MTD of similar years used many of the same parts, including decks.

    I would try to find a good tractor with a trailer (cart) for hauling. the wide tires float over most damp to lightly wet surfaces with ease. For me, a "real" garden tractor ( as opposed to a ride on lawn mower) has wheels that feature lug nuts. (rear only) Welding mower decks is relatively easy. (if they are not too far gone....otherwise they warp and you get very un-even cutting) blade spindles and towers are common failure points, so parts are available.

    Motors are easy to diagnose, and carbs easy to work on. with electronic ignitions, plugs and oil filters are all you should need to replace.

    All problems electronically can be diagnosed with a multimeter.

    JP
     
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