Which spray gun

  1. RSPSTEVE New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Wickford
    Hi all

    I am just about to rstore a 1960 ford anglia .

    I have been bought a nice Sealey 3hp 150 ltre belt driven compresser for christmas and want to know what you recomend spraygun wise .

    I have painted cars in the past (30 years ago)

    I will be etch priming , primer filling , and topcoating the underside, inteior shell and engine bay but will be leaving the maine body work to a pro.

    I dont want to pay a fortune , but also dont want Jabberwocky .

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  2. jaykay Member

    Messages:
    824
    milton keynes
    sealey guns are ok and reasonable.
     
  3. EViS Member

    Messages:
    45
    Surrey
    I'm a complete novice but having done a fair bit of research, I've gone for an Iwata AZ3 HTE. The Devilbiss FLG5 is another options. The only reason I didn't go for the latter is because it doesn't allow for the use of waterborne paints.
     
  4. jaykay Member

    Messages:
    824
    milton keynes
    them 2 are twice the price of sealey
     
  5. pedrobedro

    pedrobedro Man at Matalan

    Messages:
    9,656
    Location:
    CX Derbyshire
    And some more on top, the Devilbis is 4 times the money :( Sealey Gold are good for amateur use and spares availability if you don't want to spend pro money.
     
  6. langy

    langy langys rodshop

    Messages:
    6,099
    Location:
    London
    How you going to use waterbase paint at home then ???
     
  7. eil Member

    Messages:
    1,751
    N Wales
    The plus for the Iwata and the Devilbiss is they need less cfm and psi as opposed the Sealy gold, horses for courses really.
     
  8. jaykay Member

    Messages:
    824
    milton keynes
    all this about cfm & psi. i'm sure sprayers will agree that they, as well as me have sprayed with alot less cfm'psi then what the book calls for.and got good results.
    plus the guy said he was not wanting to spend alot on a gun.
     
  9. eil Member

    Messages:
    1,751
    N Wales
    As I said Jk horses for courses, you pays your money and all that, he also gave the impression he wanted a mid range gun, and every help you can get with air supply can only benefit someone who is starting out,we have all struggled with too small a compressor,too small a mig welder etc etc, not disagreeing with you just pointing out the others need less air, his choice.
     
  10. EViS Member

    Messages:
    45
    Surrey
    I'm not with you? The Devilbiss states that it can't be used with waterborne paints...
     
  11. langy

    langy langys rodshop

    Messages:
    6,099
    Location:
    London
    Your comment on post 3 "The only reason I didn't go for the latter is because it doesn't allow for the use of waterborne paints."
    Sounded to me like you were going to try waterbase ???


     
  12. EViS Member

    Messages:
    45
    Surrey
    Yes I was. Am I missing something?
     
  13. langy

    langy langys rodshop

    Messages:
    6,099
    Location:
    London
    Using waterbase at home is tricky, I've not had much luck so far and i've got the driers !!!


     
  14. EViS Member

    Messages:
    45
    Surrey
    Ah right, that's interesting. I've actually decided to go with Pre-Cat in the end. However haven't heard anything negative about using waterbased...
     
  15. langy

    langy langys rodshop

    Messages:
    6,099
    Location:
    London
    Thats probably because no one uses it !!!

     
  16. RSPSTEVE New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Wickford
    Thanks for your advice .

    Steve
     
  17. BillJ Member

    Messages:
    645
    Devon
    I've used water-based several times now and I don't have any drying equipment. I've had very good results.

    I'd avoid using it at this time of year, though. I did my spraying in the summer so it dried fairly quickly (but nowhere near as quickly as solvent-based paints would).

    It's very pleasant to use - smells like poster paint :laughing:
     
  18. langy

    langy langys rodshop

    Messages:
    6,099
    Location:
    London
    Bill i don't know of many people using it at home, summer may be ok but this time of year would be asking for trouble, The w/b don't dry like solvent and needs air passing over it.
     
  19. BillJ Member

    Messages:
    645
    Devon
    Indeed. As I say, I wouldn't recommend it in winter or damp weather.
    The bits I have done, I left to air-dry in my fairly large garage on a warm day.

    On the other hand, if it were something small enough, it could be dried with a fan heater or even taken indoors to dry. The chances of successfully spraying an entire car in one go with water-based would be pretty low in this weather.
     
  20. badersbus Member

    Messages:
    251
    sheffield UK
    Used waterbased at home before , but like langy says it is a lot more difficult , and if not in a controlled environment like a spray booth you have got to pick your day. Needs forced air over it , heat gun on small items on cold day , air line etc , but does smell nice LOL.
    Couple of pieces i did at home in WB and with a budget gun.
    Stick to the solvent based stuff if you are not confident IMHO.

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