When a pipe ruptures

  1. Kayos

    Kayos Member

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  2. 8ob

    8ob Forum Supporter

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    Your choice of night time reading material really worries me @Kayos, try a subject that wont bring on a nightmare

    poo bear.jpg
     
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  3. gaz1

    gaz1 Member

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    interesting is that sort of information

    we deal with that often with our job with dead leg pipes for cold and hot water not forgetting the gas pipe

    in our job i wouldnt have thought it would have an impact to a degree however with the likes of the flux it could have an affect on the piping itself if not cleaned after soldering but would take years to have an effect of the dog leg pipe becoming dangerous
     
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  4. AndersK Member

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    Search for fluid injection injury and you'll see the damage a rupture in hydraulic lines can do.

    Never ever use your hands to locate a hydraulic leak.

    I once had a close call. One expander plug shot thru my sleeve and just scratched my shoulder at 1200 bar.
     
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  5. Kayos

    Kayos Member

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    I've priced a care home refurb and (despite the fact they will be charging 6 x £1300 per week) they want to "revise the spec"
    I was looking for legionella stuff to send them
     
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  6. WorkshopChris Forum Supporter

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    Were you planning on the plumbing equivalent of a ring circuit?
    I have observed that almost all of the hospital showers have some sort of inbuilt timer and will run for a short period at least once a day automatically.
     
  7. gaz1

    gaz1 Member

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  8. Kayos

    Kayos Member

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    Its called a secondary hot water return loop, including a pump.

    It doesn't have to be done that way but you need the water at the furthest outlet to be 55deg in one minute, not going to happen in this setup without the loop and I wont be liable for it
     
  9. Kayos

    Kayos Member

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    It's already an old care home but doubling the wetrooms and no existing loop in place, I've quoted £28k plus vat to install the wetrooms, new plant room and the secondary loop. I thought I'd gone in cheap as well
     
  10. gaz1

    gaz1 Member

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    stick to your guns kayos at least you know you wont get any comebacks at you

    if they want another installer to do it let them as you wont be held responsible if anything occurs as not your job
     
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  11. Kayos

    Kayos Member

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    That is the basis of the call I'm making monday, I'm happy to tweak things but if they want to bodge it someone else can do the job. I dont need the work, would be nice but I'm not cutting corners in a healthcare setting
     
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  12. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

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    Legionella by any chance?

    Have a search around this

    https://www.dolphinsquare.co.uk/about-dolphin-square/legionnaires-disease-update/

    Stuff of proper nightmares. Drinking water comes from bore holes and no one knows how many dead legs there are. Over 2000 flats !!!!!
     
  13. Kayos

    Kayos Member

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    The one I linked was a pipe that ruptured and dumped 75 tons of "boiling hydrocarbons" due to a dead leg on the pipe splitting

    I was searching for legionella stuff and that came up
     
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  14. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

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    There was a big fire explosion in one of the USA refineries, due to liquid dropping out in a dead leg then freezing, forget which one. Its often used in process safety training.

    Let them bodge it, you can then get double to put it right!
     
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  15. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    Il bet half the older systems that have had combi boilers Installed cheaply have a good few dead legs.

    Seen a fair few myself
     
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  16. 8ob

    8ob Forum Supporter

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    Is a radiator or a sink thats not been turned on or used for a long while not also deemed a dead leg :dontknow: All sounds like a load of that jabber stuff to me :scared:

    Bob
     
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  17. gaz1

    gaz1 Member

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    yes it can but when radiator turned back on it will flush around the heating system again

    its long term never used dead legs that can have air in them as well as dead water the heated side is worse than the cold side
     
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  18. Kayos

    Kayos Member

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    Sink that hasn't been used is considered a risk. Single ended supplies will have sentinel taps, usually first and last, these should be used periodically

    Legionella is a very real and serious risk, the bacteria thrives at temperatures we like for showering and a shower makes water mist, perfect way to get it into your system

    A radiator isn't as much of a risk unless you are bleeding it, I've seen some nasty infected tanks though

    Obviously this is more relevant in a care home or health care environment, I have opened a tap at the far end of a large property and got some nasty black water out once, again not what I'd want to be touching
     
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  19. gaz1

    gaz1 Member

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    Temperature affects the survival of Legionella as follows:[3]

    • Above 70 °C (158 °F) – Legionella dies almost instantly
    • At 60 °C (140 °F) – 90% die in 2 minutes (Decimal reduction time (D) = 2 minutes)
    • At 50 °C (122 °F) – 90% die in 80–124 minutes, depending on strain (D = 80–124 minutes)
    • 48 to 50 °C (118 to 122 °F) – can survive but do not multiply
    • 32 to 42 °C (90 to 108 °F) – ideal growth range
    • 25 to 45 °C (77 to 113 °F) – growth range
    • Below 20 °C (68 °F) – can survive, even below freezing, but are dormant
     
  20. Kayos

    Kayos Member

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    38-42 is limit for showers so water is stored at 70 and circulated at 60, only blended at the point of use
     
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