whats your rule for welding close to a fuel tank

  1. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    1,667
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    Main rule for me would be to not do it alone.
    Someone decent watching (not playing with a phone!)
    Most of the time I would just go for it but if there is a big gap above a plastic tank and I am welding something rusty I will get a mate to hold a bit of sheet above the torch so any splatter goes downwards.
    Plastic tanks are pretty tough but big blob of molten on the top might manage to melt through.

    Unless it's something you are modding then also remember if it's old and rusty enough to need welding the rest of it won't be mint either. If you start pushing old fuel hoses out of the way they can split and start to seep fuel that runs along the outside of the line without you being able to see it through a mask.
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  2. doubleboost

    doubleboost Member

    Messages:
    2,716
    Location:
    North Easr England
    Closer than you would think possible
     
    anto44 and Sean like this.
  3. Sean Another 602 fan

    Messages:
    1,163
    Edinburgh
    Ive welded the rear suspension on a race car with full fuel load and driver sat in the car with the engine running !

    it really depends on how much welding and how long the cars going to be worked on - and those white glassfiber blankets are useless any spatter goes through them like a finger through wet Andrex! get some rubber mats.
     
  4. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,149
    Location:
    london
    Depends what you are doing.....with my mr2 I just made a fire curtain...fire blankets and some strong magnets....you can easily isolate the tank from any sparks....and/or isolate what you are doing...put a blanket over the tank held to the car with magnets.....put blankets between the car and the floor around where you are working.

    Still doesn't fully mitigate the fumes risk....but a full tank of petrol and good ventilation can reduce that risk?

    Even with all that....on my latest project I just pulled the tank. It required extensive restoration and I didn't want to be working around tanks and sparks and fumes.
     
  5. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    27,597
    Location:
    yarm
    just cover it up with a few wet sheets .make sure the tanks full so you don't get any fumes build up in it . have a fire extinguisher handy and get on with it :) if your that scared don't bother . get someone else
     
  6. Melvyn Best Member

    Messages:
    195
    Location:
    Cambridge
    Just ask the guys from Blow in Colours that was in New Street next to Mackays Steve, guy was welding in a pit when the car went up .
     
  7. premmington

    premmington Member

    Messages:
    1,397
    Location:
    Norfolk
    Vehicle repair pits - without extraction are very dangerous.

    Vehicle fumes - petrol fumes - argon from MIG welding -

    There are loads of reported cases of fire and suffocation using them.

    Most modern pre fabricated lorry inspection kits - don't have extraction - they have a fan that gives the pit a positive air pressure - forcing the fumes up and out. They are normally wired into the lights so you always have them on.
     
  8. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    27,597
    Location:
    yarm
    I have a pit in my garage its about 6 foot long / I only ever use it with a vehicle half over it in case of a quick escape. by rights you should have exit at both sides. it only gets used on oil changes and drive shafts etc not welding.. it once filled up with propane gas from a leaking torch left on the floor :oI blew it all out with a large fan :)
     
Advertisements