welding improving - any tips.

  1. kernowcam Member

    Messages:
    78
    South West uk
    Hi Guys
    My mig welding is improving rapidly totally due to the help of Malcolms wewbsite and the forum. good stuff.

    How about a few responses on those hints and tips which you like. Doesn't matter if its obvious because as a learner they often are the most helpful.

    I spoke to a guy who used to make Range Rover dash boards and his tip was to fill a hole in thin metal put a lump of brass behind and weld the hole to close it up. This stops burn through. He reckons you can fill a 1" hole in this way.

    Over to you.
    ian
     
  2. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    My most useful tip would be to keep an eye on the tip of the welder (no pun intended). Every now and again I think I've forgotten how to weld, then realise the wire isn't coming out of the welder consistently. Most of the time that's due to the tip gound out of shape for one reason or another and gripping the wire as the wire gets hot and expands.

    Another tip for car welders is not to weld a seam weld in one go. Do very small nicely spaced out runs, then let everything cool down before some more runs. It takes way longer to sort out a distorted panel (or frame) than it does to weld one without distortion very very slowly.
     
  3. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,337
    Somerset
    If you cant get your hands on a chunk of brass, aluminium will also do the same job....

    And as Malc said, keep your shroud and tip clean, just tap the torch on something every now and again and the spatter will just drop out....

    Always make sure you have a good earth, the cheapo crocodile clip clamps are useless, invest in a good one if you can....

    Keep you torch hose as straight as possible...

    Never start a weld ontop of a tack, it will melt and the piece may move.

    I could go on...and on...!
     
  4. Lurcher Member

    Messages:
    27
    cheltenham
    Please do!
    Just keeping the torch straight has helped me.
    All these things you experienced welders take for
    granted are revelations to us novices.
    Keep 'em coming..
    cheers
    Degz
     
  5. Lurcher Member

    Messages:
    27
    cheltenham
    Wire diameter

    I'm currently using 0.8mm wire for welding 1mm mild steel with varying results. Would using 0.6mm be a better choice?
    Any comments always welcome.
    cheers
    Degz
     
  6. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    I suspect 0.6mm would be better for thin stuff - it would give you a finer control over wire speed.

    Talking about wire - I've come up with another tip. A tiny bit of rust on welding wire makes the wire rollers slip. I needed to do a couple of tacks in steel today and didn't bother unwinding back to clean wire. :oops:
     
  7. kernowcam Member

    Messages:
    78
    South West uk
    My local welding garues suggested to keep the wire corrosion free when not being used a lot to spray it with wd40 inside the welder cover! Not sure myself about the burn off when welding??????? any comments
     
  8. Lurcher Member

    Messages:
    27
    cheltenham
    Thanks Malcol,
    I'll give the 0.6mm a go and post the feedback.
    Keep up the good work with the site, it's cracking for us novices.
    cheers
    Degz
     
  9. Lurcher Member

    Messages:
    27
    cheltenham
    Sh*t missed an M off your name
    Sorry Malcolm!
     
  10. ^neo^

    ^neo^ Member

    Messages:
    459
    Surrey
    Anti spatter spray does the same, also helps to lubricate the wire as it goes through the liner.
     
  11. Phill Member

    Messages:
    13
    Berkshire
    some great tips there! wish I knew that little lot before I started
     
  12. Lurcher Member

    Messages:
    27
    cheltenham
    Back to the TOP!
    Any more tips for us newbies?
    cheers
    Lurcher
     
  13. 6thdude Member

    Messages:
    27
    Derby
    Keep your screen clean!!!
    Mine had about 10 years of dirty stuck between the clear glass and the shade. I can see what I'm doing now!!!!!
    jim
     
  14. kernowcam Member

    Messages:
    78
    South West uk
    can you clean it or just replace it? Mine is filthy? With what?
    Do you need a diff one for mig or gas?
     
  15. 6thdude Member

    Messages:
    27
    Derby
    I don't think you need a full mask for gas welding, just the dark googles, though I've never done any myself.
    All I did was remove the glasses and clean them with some damp kitchen roll. If the clear lens in burnt or covered with weld spatter will we need replacing, they aren't expensive though.
    jim
     
  16. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,337
    Somerset
    Yeah, just the googles are fine for gas welding.

    If you have a normal headshield, the glass inside should be fine with just a wipe over, but the plastic (polycarbonate) cover lense you may as well replace it or wash it in soapy water.

    For automatic helmets, they have a tendancy for the dirt to get between the front cover lense and liquid crystal casette, just remove the cover lense and use a soft cloth and a bit of breath to clean the casette, a wash in a bit of fairy liquid will be fine for the outer lense, or just replace it.
    They also have an internal cover lense which occasionally needs a wash or replacement. What ever you do, dont try and do without the outer cover lense!

    If you just wipe the covers with tissue it tends to lightly scratch it, which wont make it much better!
     
  17. paul_c Member

    Messages:
    42
    This sounds a really daft one, but make sure you're fully pressing the trigger. With thick welding gloves, its possible to think you're pressing it, but in fact you're only partly pressing it down. Depending on the machine, this could mean the wire and electrical power feeds, but the gas flow is only a fraction of what it should be. If you're a beginner, you might not realise, and not notice the lack of gas flow.
     
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