Weld Quality Check

  1. Tony Hanson Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    van1.jpg van2.jpg Hiya
    Not even really started yet but I would like to get an opinion on a repair that I have seen on facebook, as it would be the sort of repair that I plan on doing.
    Would this be called a good weld?
    I see quite a few holes in the weld. Would that be ok for std body panels? If in roofing panel , surely would leak?
    Your input would be appreciated.
    thanks
     
  2. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,711
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    the weld line has plenty of holes that wasnt filled up properly yes you could fill them with filla

    as goes for top pic id have cut a little more out that however it depend on what you want to pay for it being done some just say do minimale work to get past its mot

    i can see that part causing trouble in the future
     
  3. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    If it's in the roof, wouldn't it need to be fully welded to retain strength? :dontknow:
     
  4. Tony Hanson Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    Several Questions.
    Is this acceptable work? (I need something to aim for)
    What would be an ideal weld in this sort of environment? (example photos would really help)
     
  5. Tony Hanson Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    Stoopid question...What do you mean by fully welded? In the areas (of sprinter van) I will be trying to do, will be right at the back as the roof curves down, including a length of gutter and also fill a cut/hole due to skylight fitting. The best way to fix will dictate how I make any initial repairs.
     
  6. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    A complete line of weld, not like the row of 'tacks' (spots) as at the bottom of the 2nd pic.
     
  7. keithski122 Member

    Messages:
    1,047
    uk
    I wouldn't fill the holes with fiiler as it will aborb moisture from the rear and rust out.I like to get a hole free finish, a bit of seam sealer to the back should stop moisture getting in.
     
    Tony Hanson likes this.
  8. Tony Hanson Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    Doable with very thin plate?
     
  9. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Define "very thin"
     
  10. Ruffian Member

    Messages:
    2,438
    Location:
    Devon UK
    Yes with taking your time, low amps, and patience.

    Tack the pieces then work across tacking leaving a decent space (2inches) between them.

    Let cool then tack the side of the tacks, then cool and repeat until fully welded.

    P.s panel beaters do it daily. Just practice on scrap first
     
  11. Tony Hanson Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    I think that sprinter bodywork is about 1.5 mm might be even thinner maybe down to 1mm. I wont know until some comes off. The only bits that have been cut off so far are have lost a huge amount of material to rust so cant tell how thick they should be
     
  12. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    In that case, should be no problem. Follow the forum tutorial and do tacks initially to minimise warping - you can then fill in between afterwards.

    The secret is to practice on scrap until you're happy with your technique and machine settings. ;)
     
  13. Tony Hanson Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    That is the sort of thing that I was thinking about.
    So would run a short beads of weld in between tacks (stitch weld??????)? Or just fill in the gaps with more and more tacks?
    In either case, I take it I would be aiming for something with no holes ie one long complete weld (after its been ground down)?
     
  14. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Tacks first, from either end working inwards to allow cooling. Then you can infill.
     
  15. Tony Hanson Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    Sorry to be pedantic but, using the photo as an example, there would be a weld of say 60cm. Of said 60cm maybe tack welds spaced about 8” apart????
    How to infill tho?
    With more and more tack welds or with longer runs of weld?
     
  16. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Yes, if it's that long you could do it that way - but personally I'd tack the far end first.

    But, remember, I 'm no expert. :ashamed:
     
  17. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,711
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    all done to a transit van

    15672908_718902054925839_7208849379923335312_n.jpg 17553462_769918389824205_8671378415204466610_n.jpg 16864670_754156548067056_821735448209588831_n.jpg
     
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  18. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,935
    Location:
    halifax, England
  19. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    If the patch is right at the rear and just above the doors as you seem to suggest, you may find there's more 'fabrication' involved once you start cutting out the rot.
     
  20. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    6,041
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
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