Vertical Weld

  1. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

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    306
    Location:
    Southampton
    In the very near future I need to weld a couple of butt joints, lap joints and at least one T joint, all of them in the vertical position and in 3mm steel.

    I want to practice before doing the job, so is it better to weld up or weld down? Any advice will be gratefully received :thumbup:
     
  2. Dcal

    Dcal Forum Supporter

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    1,994
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    Antrim Northern Ireland
    What process?
    Is it structural?
     
  3. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

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    306
    Location:
    Southampton
    It's MIG and although not structural, I want it to be strong :thumbup:
     
  4. nickk Forum Supporter

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    2,274
    Location:
    Hay-on-wye
    Up,is stronger and essential on anything above 3mm,so down may be adequate.
     
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  5. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

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    306
    Location:
    Southampton
    Thanks Nick :thumbup:
     
  6. TechWise Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    South Ayrshire, UK
    I generally work on hollow sections up the 100x100x5. I always weld downhill as it's a bit easier. Never had a failed weld yet.

    I asked the lecturer at college about it who teaches all the coded welds. He said anything as thin as that and you shouldn't waste your time trying to go uphill.
     
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  7. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

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    306
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    Thanks for that :thumbup:
     
  8. tom2207 Member

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    1,568
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    If its to code you dont usually get an option you weld exactly as it says in the weld procedure. End of.

    For your job , as long as your not in danger of under filling , do what suits you best .
     
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  9. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

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    306
    Location:
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    Thanks for your advice Tom :thumbup:
     
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  10. TechWise Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    South Ayrshire, UK
    Just to clarify, he was referring to things where the welder wasn't constrained by a drawing or specification. Nothing coded.

    Its pretty much exclusively agricultural stuff I do.
     
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  11. tom2207 Member

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    1,568
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    You will have no probs , by the sounds of it your well used to how it should look , its easy to get garried away on a down hill run and under fill as the puddle is running away from you and you end up playing catch up , if thats the case , bung another run down it , generally speaking if it looks right it will be grand .
    I know thats not always the case , but its a fair rule of thumb ,, I used to have an x ray showing a pair of deck plates where the welder had thrown about five rods into a gap , and buttered over them , the rods were as clear as day on the graph , in real life the cap looked perfect ,, but thats me starting to wander.
     
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  12. chip Member

    Messages:
    41
    uk leicester
    ive had the misfortune of having to run thousands of welds all vertical down all lap joints at one particular place. ranging from 200mm to 500mm long, talking mig, long vertical lap joints and sheet metal,the best tool in my box was a white marker pen :welder: running the marker the length of the joint would make it way more visible when running a weld down it, these had to be continuous straight neat welds with minimal cleaning needed just a degrease for powder coat.
    personally i struggled at first,even with 20 years experience at the time as a welder,the worst of it was seeing the lap joint as your running down it
    so if your eyes are as bad as mine:whistle:
     
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  13. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

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    306
    Location:
    Southampton
    Never thought of using a white marker! Thanks for the tip, and my eyes aren't the best :vsad:
     
  14. Feet 'n Inches

    Feet 'n Inches Out of the rat-race at last

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    207
    Location:
    Devon, England
    If you're able to reduce the angle from 90 degrees to something less severe, the risk of the weld pool running away will be reduced.
     
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  15. chip Member

    Messages:
    41
    uk leicester
    yeah you might not have the same issue on 3mm my material was 1.5,just thought id throw it up there:)
     
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  16. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    1,568
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    or a lamp behind your torch to get a definition thing , depending what your welding a whit marker ,, ie paint pen , may just be frowned on .
    If is nothing important , and contamination isnt a problem , just use your welding chalk to high lite the edge .
     
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